British Equestrian Federation could lose £21m funding after bullying is revealed

first_imgShare on Facebook The British Equestrian Federation has been told it risks losing public funding of more than £21m after a damning report found evidence of bullying, elitism and self-interest within the sport.The independent report was commissioned by the national governing body in October following the abrupt resignation of its chief executive, Clare Salmon, in July. She had been appointed in February 2016 to modernise the BEF but, as the report details, her approach ruffled feathers within equestrianism and she was forced out.Salmon thanked the three-strong review panel, which was chaired by John Mehrzad, the lawyer who prepared a similar report for British Cycling last year. Since you’re here… “From day one I was set up to fail by people who were deliberately frustrating the change required,” Salmon said. “I was bullied out by people driven by self-interest and elitism. This is unacceptable for an organisation receiving more than £20m of public money.”The threat to the funding of the sport – one of Britain’s most successful at recent Olympic and Paralympic Games – is made clear at the end of the report.“In so far that the recommendations in this report are not addressed within a reasonable period of time … UK Sport and Sport England would be entitled to suspend public funding,” it said.In response, the two agencies issued a statement saying they welcomed the review and the “full acceptance” of its recommendations by the BEF and its 19 member bodies. “Ongoing funding will be dependent on the BEF and its member bodies acting to implement the recommendations of this review. We will keep this under close review.”The report found that a “climate of fear” and “culture of bullying” exists within British Dressage and British Showjumping, with “broadly similar” allegations made from a smaller number of contributors about British Eventing, the British Horse Society and Endurance GB.The report also highlights the fact the sport is too expensive, is run by small cliques and therefore struggles to retain staff.It is the latest sports governing body to face negative allegations about its culture, after reviews were conducted at British Cycling, Canoeing, British Swimming and British Bobsleigh. Share on WhatsApp Share on Pinterest Support The Guardian Read more British Equestrian Federation launches investigation into bullying claims Sport politics Topics Share on Twitter … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. news Reuse this content Share on Messenger Share on LinkedIn Share via Email Equestrianismlast_img

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