Vermont Public Television plans new magazine show

first_imgVermont Public Television, Vermont’s statewide public television network, is making plans for a new, locally produced magazine program on air and online with the working title ‘Green Mountain Guide.’ VPT aims for an early 2012 launch of a weekly showcase for interesting people, regional culture, outdoor experiences, local history and important public issues.  Audiences will notice a few other changes to VPT’s production landscape. The call-in program ‘Public Square’ will not return this fall. While VPT plans to continue its examination and discussion of important issues, they will be handled during the magazine show or through more prominent special reports.VPT will continue to broadcast its venerable interview program, ‘Profile,’ each week but does not plan to produce new episodes for the fall. ‘‘Profile’ has introduced us to some fascinating people,’ Scott said, ‘but after a decade in production, we want to change things up. This doesn’t mean we will end our conversations with interesting people or our long relationship with ‘Profile’ host Fran Stoddard. There will be room for both in VPT’s new local production plans.’ ‘We know Vermonters love Vermont,’ said Kathryn A. Scott, chief content officer for VPT, ‘And we know our audiences have a real thirst for information and entertainment that enlightens and enriches their understanding of the world. With ‘Green Mountain Guide,’ we hope to give them a slice of what they crave: even greater knowledge and appreciation of the people, places and ideas that make Vermont unique.’‘We intend to offer a combination of timely reports, in-depth conversations and fascinating stories you won’t find anywhere else,’ Scott said. VPT hopes to make the ‘Green Mountain Guide’ a permanent part of its lineup but will begin with a short-term commitment and then assess audience response and options for longer-range support.‘Green Mountain Guide’ will be just part of a new approach at VPT. ‘We want to get even more from our production efforts around the region,’ Scott said. ‘We are mindful that our supporters literally invest in our efforts, so our team works hard to be practical, frugal and nimble in our approach to storytelling.’‘We are more than a statewide television network. VPT provides an extensive public media system which can help people make real, human connections throughout New England,’ Scott said. ‘Vermonters are active people with busy lives. We need to offer our content where and when it’s convenient for them. For example, we routinely make our programs available online or out in the community, sometimes even before airing them on TV.’New projects in the pipeline include a focus on some of Vermont’s summer music workshops and festivals, including the KoSA International Percussion Workshop, the Manchester Music Festival, the Vermont Youth Orchestra and Grace Potter’s Grand Points North festival. Short video stories from these events will air during local slots that are part of the new PBS Arts Fall Festival beginning in October. Expanded versions will appear in ‘Green Mountain Guide’ and a locally produced performance special.Also coming in October, VPT-produced stories about bootleggers and rum-runners in Vermont will debut as companions to ‘Prohibition,’ a new PBS film from Ken Burns and Lynn Novick. Then, new episodes of VPT’s award-winning ‘Emerging Science’ will kick off PBS Science Wednesdays to complement new seasons of ‘NOVA’ and ‘Nature.’This approach is designed to make it easier for audiences to find new content right next to similar programs they already enjoy. It also will give VPT a chance to cover many more topics without the heavy commitments required when undertaking lengthier documentaries or single-subject series.VPT. 9.14.2011last_img read more

Lazio: Quarantine for squad is ridiculous

first_img The other sticking point of the protocol was the decision to make a club medic liable if a player contracts COVID-19. “In that case, let me take the responsibility of deciding not to put the whole group into quarantine. I have no problem with that. Let’s follow the German model, which only quarantines the positive person for 15 days.” This is not entirely accurate, because the German model does leave the ultimate decision on quarantine to the local health authorities. read also:Lazio, Wolves in talks over partnership That has already been put into practice at Dynamo Dresden, a team in the German second division, who saw the whole squad quarantined after two players tested positive. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentWhat Are The Most Delicious Foods Out There?6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone8 Things That Will Happen If An Asteroid Hits EarthBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?8 Fascinating Facts About Coffee20 Completely Unexpected Facts About ‘The Big Bang Theory’6 Extreme Facts About HurricanesCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksInsane 3D Spraying Skills Turn In Incredible Street Art11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table Top Lazio chief medic Ivo Pulcini maintains the protocol demanding the whole group quarantine for one positive COVID-19 case is ‘truly ridiculous.’ The medical protocol was confirmed today, meaning Serie A sides can resume contact training from Monday, with a plan to restart games from June 13. “Putting the whole squad and staff in quarantine if one person tests positive is truly ridiculous, in my view,” Lazio chief medic Pulcini told Radio Radio. “The scientific committee did not want to listen to the views of those who work in football medicine, who deal with what happens on the pitch and don’t just sit behind a desk. “If I have a positive case, I put him in isolation, then test all the others. If they are healthy and test negative, why should I treat them as if they are ill? Are we crazy? Do these people know what a medic actually does?”Advertisement Loading… last_img read more

Teddy Sagi sells 10% shareholding in Playtech Plc targeting $400 million cashout

first_img Submit StumbleUpon Optimove expands real-time dynamics to help betting meet new marketing demands August 27, 2019 Share Related Articles Share Israel Tax Authority and Aspire Global reach €13.7m settlement January 3, 2020 GiG ups code security oversight with Checkmarx July 10, 2020 Playtech founder Teddy Sagi continues to divest his shareholdings in the company, having issued a trading note detailing that personal investment vehicle Brickington Trading Limited is preparing to sell approximately 32 million share in Playtech Plc.Updating investors, Brickington will place approximately 10.1% of Playtech issued share capital up for sale. At present value, Playtech Plc shares are valued at a 3-year high of 993.50p. Business news sources report that Sagi will likely target a $400 million (£316 million) sale for his latest share offload.Once executed, the Israeli billionaire will dilute his shareholding in Playtech Plc from 17.8% to 7.7% of the firm’s equity and voting rights.The share sale represents Sagi’s latest divestment in Playtech Plc. Last March, Brickington sold 4.1% -13 million Playtech shares – on behalf of Sagi to London hedge fund Boussard & Gavaudan, netting the company founder £113 million.Reducing his main shareholding in Playtech, a technology company he founded in 1998, Sagi sold a 12% shareholding last November for £330 million. It has been reported that to date, Sagi has pocketed in excess of $1.35 billion in cash through selling his Playtech shares.Sagi retains an advisory role within Playtech. As a major shareholder in the firm Sagi will be barred from selling any additional shares for a period of 180-days.Cashing-in on his Playtech fortune, Sagi is reported to have diversified his investment portfolio in property and new technologies.last_img read more

TRAGIC CHURCHILL BOY WAS DUE TO START LAST YEAR OF PRIMARY SCHOOL

first_imgThe young boy killed in a tragic farm accident in Kerrykeel yesterday has been named locally as Jamie Toner.Jamie, 11, was the much-loved son of Roisin and James Toner of Cruckraw, Churchill and brother of Lynn.A fifth class pupil at Stramore National School in Glendowan, Jamie died following an accident at his uncle’s farm in Glenvar around lunchtime yesterday. It is believed Jamie may have become trapped under a tractor while silage was being collected.He was rushed to Letterkenny General Hospital where surgeons battled to save his life but he died a short time laterThere was a huge outpouring of grief in both communities of Kerrykeel and Churchill/Glenswilly where the late boy’s mother Roisin (nee Friel) and dad James are from.Jamie was a very popular figure in the local community and was a keen member of the local youth club. A member of the parent’s committee at Stramore NS said everyone was in shock at Jamie’s sudden and tragic death.“He was a lovely young fella and everyone is just in shock and are numb by what has happened.“He was due to go into sixth class this year. Now there will be one less pupil coming back in September and that will be very hard for the kids and the teachers to accept. It’s just awful.“Our thoughts and prayers are with James, Roisin and Lynn and all the family at this time,” she said. TRAGIC CHURCHILL BOY WAS DUE TO START LAST YEAR OF PRIMARY SCHOOL was last modified: July 15th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:ChurchillJames and Roisin TonerJamie TonerStramore NSlast_img read more

Africa ‘can compete globally’

first_img13 June 2007African businesses can become far more competitive, but African governments and their international partners will need to improve access to finance, rebuild infrastructure and strengthen institutions.This is according to the Africa Competitiveness Report 2007, which was released this week at the 17th World Economic Forum (WEF) on Africa, which takes place in Cape Town between 13 and 15 June.The report, jointly compiled by the WEF, the African Development Bank and the World Bank, analyses many aspects of Africa’s business environment and highlights the key issues that hinder improvements in Africa’s competitiveness and job growth.According to a statement issued by the WEF this week, the report includes the rankings of 29 African countries in the Global Competitiveness Index, detailed competitiveness and investment climate profiles, the effect of gender disparities on employment and competitiveness and the role of new technologies in fostering a more dynamic business environment.“Africa has the potential to become a far more competitive player in the global economy,” said the World Bank’s Africa region Vice President, Obiageli Katryn Ezekwesili.“The study finds that, while a number of governments have significantly improved the business climate in their countries, the region as a whole has much more to do to make Africa a competitive location for enterprise. These changes in the business climate, together with greater access to finance and new investment in infrastructure, should come together to advance Africa’s drive to develop, create jobs and reduce poverty.”The common themes that emerge from the report are the requirement for sound government policies, the current lack of access to financial services, the need for an improved regulatory environment, poor transportation and energy infrastructure and business having to deal with corruption.The report also points to the growing number of success stories in the region that show the steps countries can take to improve business conditions.Trade and investment is vitalAccording to WEF founder and executive chairman Klaus Schwab, the report is an attempt to place the continent in a broader international context and to cast light on the important aspects of development in the region.“The key to the future of African economies is trade and investment and, therefore, the business climate. This is achieved by rallying investors to look at opportunities in African countries differently,” said African Development Bank President Donald Kaberuka.“But we must vigorously now deal with the other set of barriers – physical – that means infrastructure. It is crystal clear today that energy shortages, poor roads and inadequate communication between countries and regions constitute a real impediment to the private sector and economic growth and, in the case of energy shortages, threaten to roll back economic achievements of the last six years,” he said.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Connecting small business to the world can help Africa thrive

first_imgAn M-Pesa agent in the Bunda region of Kenya. It is estimated that a third of the country’s US$44-billion annual economic output now flows through the innovative mobile money transfer service . (Image: Emil Sjöblom, Flickr)• Jarle HetlandMedia officerInternational Trade Centre+41 22 730-0145hetland@intracen.orgArancha GonzálezSub-Saharan Africa is a rare bright spot in a still-sluggish world economy, with the International Monetary Fund projecting 6% output growth this year. A decade of expansion has been driven by peace, better economic governance, investment and high commodity prices. But make no mistake: it has not just been about resources. Some of the best performing countries are not rich in natural resources, such as Rwanda, Ethiopia and Burkina Faso. Services such as retail and communications, together with agribusiness and manufacturing and exports, have driven growth more than is generally recognised. Business incubators and accelerators are spawning technology start-ups from Accra to Dar es Salaam.That said, Africa faces daunting challenges. The extractive sector propels growth in several countries but does not directly create many stable jobs. By 2050, the continent’s labour force will be bigger than that of China or India. Creating jobs for hundreds of millions of labour market entrants will mean the difference between a demographic dividend and a social time bomb. Africans don’t just need more jobs; they need better jobs. Prosperity hinges on getting people out of subsistence agriculture and marginal self-employment into more productive activities.Growth without diversification, technological improvement, and increased productivity is easily reversed: all it takes is a dip in commodity prices. This is where trade and small to medium enterprises, or SMEs, fit in. Trade demands competitiveness. Exporting firms are more productive, and pay higher wages than their domestically focused counterparts, especially in places like sub-Saharan Africa. If firms manage to thrive in world markets, they tend to increase their productivity even more.Turning mobile phones into banksJust take a look at the success story that is M-Pesa .The impending launch in Europe of this mobile money transfer service, which has transformed the way banking and business are done in East Africa, is more than a feel-good story about technology pioneered in one of the world’s poorest regions being imported to one of its richest.M-Pesa is a powerful example of the gains to be had when the development community works together creatively to empower people and businesses in developing countries. From a modest pilot project focused on microfinance repayments, M-Pesa – “pesa” means “money” in Kiswahili – has grown to the point that an estimated one-third of Kenya’s $44-billion annual economic output now flows through it. M-Pesa has turned mobile phones into both offices and banks.Responsive governments committed to improving the broader trade facilitation and business environment can help companies of all sizes by improving infrastructure: roads, transportation, ports, information and communication technology, and electricity. For enterprises to capitalise on opportunities to grow, they need access to finance. This can be difficult for SMEs that are too big for microfinance institutions but too small to interest commercial lenders.Meeting export markets’ health and quality standards, together with the dizzying array of private voluntary standards, is especially tough for smaller firms, although the rewards for compliance can be considerable. The recent World Trade Organisation agreement on trade facilitation should cut customs-related red tape which weighs heavily on SMEs, making it easier and cheaper to bring goods across borders.Internationalising small businessThe International Trade Centre works to internationalise SMEs in developing countries. Some of our work is with governments to improve policies and to strengthen their institutions in trade and export development. The rest of our work is with the private sector: creating free intelligence tools to help them learn about conditions in potential markets; assisting them to connect to value chains; helping with product branding; and tackling non-tariff measures.In our experience, modest, targeted interventions can yield substantial rewards. Facilitating contact (and contracts) between Southeast Asia and Western and Central Africa yielded over $150-million in deals for cashews, rice, and cotton in the space of a few years. Bringing experts from Bangladesh spinning mills to the Tanzania to train cotton farmers and gin operators on how to reduce contamination, led to higher prices for the farmers and better raw material for the mills. Connecting women in rural Burkina Faso to a rising star in Italian fashion meant more sales than ever for their traditional prints which helped Stella Jean’s high-end customers do some good while being fashionable.Watch: Stella Jean’s “ethical fashion” using prints from Burkina Faso:Governments, African business, foreign investors, and civil society groups have an opportunity to pool their ingenuity and their resources to find innovative new ways to strengthen the African private sector and help SMEs access capital and markets.The broader development community can support the private sector to improve productivity and generate jobs which can free people from unemployment or the drudgery of subsistence labour. Prioritising the private sector will require some development policy experimentation.Small risks, huge payoffsInternational investors, representatives of international and regional organisations, and African leaders from government and civil society, who attended the World Economic Forum on Africa in Abuja, Nigeria last month are seeking to translate the region’s economic promise and youthful demographics into employment opportunities and poverty reduction.A key subject at the Abuja summit was the bottlenecks that prevent existing and yet-to-be-founded firms in African countries from exporting value-added goods and services, and think about how best to encourage investment and hiring in modern, tradable sectors.The policy makers and policy takers at the Abuja meeting could take a lesson from M-Pesa’s success where small risks can have huge payoffs. They can think about how they can work together to help the continent’s biggest job creator: its immense ecosystem of micro, small and medium-sized enterprises. Empowering the African private sector to tap into value chains would bolster prospects for growth and job creation.Arancha González is the executive director of the International Trade Centre, Geneva. This article originally appeared on the World Economic Forum Blog.last_img read more