HARD TRYING TIME FOR EBBY PREVAILS BY A NECK IN $56,000 SANTA ANITA ALLOWANCE FEATURE AS DESORMEAUX & SHERLOCK TEAM FOR SIX FURLONG TRIUMPH IN 1:10.48

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Jan. 26, 2017)–Third while between horses turning for home, gutty Time for Ebby kept to her task and prevailed by a neck under Kent Desormeaux in Thursday’s $56,000 allowance feature at Santa Anita.  Trained by Gary Sherlock, she registered her second consecutive win in combination with Desormeax and got six furlongs over a fast main track in 1:10.48.The 9-5 favorite in a field of seven older fillies and mares bred or sired in California, Time for Ebby paid $5.60, $3.40 and $2.60.  A 4-year-old filly by Time to Get Even out of the Touch Gold mare Ebbets Field, she was bred by Terry Lovingier and is owned by Lovingier, Beckerle and Causky.Time for Ebby now has three wins from eight starts and with the winner’s share of $33,600, she increased her earnings to $81,925.“She ran hard today,” said Desormeaux.  “Gary thought she might be a little short (training-wise), but she just tries so hard.  She wasn’t able to quicken with that other filly (eventual fourth place finisher Ready to Hula Lula) turning for home, but she just kept grinding and that’s what won it.”Ridden by Joe Talamo, Zuzu’s Petals broke a tad slow from post position two, but flew late to be second, finishing a half length in front of Top Notch.  Off at 4-1, “Zuzu” paid $4.80 and $3.40.Top Notch, who was just to the outside of the winner around the far turn and through the lane, proved third best under Stewart Elliott.  Off at 15-1, she finished three quarters of a length in front of a tiring Ready to Hula Lula and paid $4.60 to show.First post time for an eight race card on Friday at Santa Anita is at 1 p.m.  Admission gates open at 11 a.m.last_img read more

Hotline numbers released to report price gougers

first_img Bahamas Min. of Labour speaks on Price Gouging Recommended for you Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #PriceGouging, #PriceInspectors PNP Opposition: Premier has got the Power Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, September 5, 2017 – Nassau – Labour Minister Dion Foulkes had something to say to merchants today, and to the consumers he announced a hotline number to report #pricegouging which is a crime.    The Minister said, “it is illegal, unethical and immoral for businesses in The Bahamas to artificially increase the price of goods and services offered for sale or hire in an attempt to secure abnormal profits in anticipation or in the aftermath of a national disaster, in this instance, Hurricane Irma.”Minister Foulkes explained that the Government has directed #PriceInspectors throughout The Bahamas, Inspectors from the Bureau of Standards, and Family Island Administrators to be keenly vigilant and monitor businesses suspected of price gouging.The Hotline numbers are: 376-1507 and 376-5125.The Minister said his officers will pay special attention to those who try to inflate prices on bread basket items.    It was also explained that the three of the major fuel suppliers had sufficient fuel (regular and diesel) to satisfy the public demand pre and post Hurricane Irma.#MagneticMediaNews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Bahamas PM warns “Price Gouging is a criminal offense”last_img read more

California is 1st state to require women on corporate boards

first_imgCalifornia is 1st state to require women on corporate boards Updated: 12:33 PM AP, Categories: California News, Local San Diego News Tags: Jerry Brown AP Posted: October 1, 2018 October 1, 2018 SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California has become the first state to require publicly traded companies to include women on their boards of directors, one of several laws boosting or protecting women that Gov. Jerry Brown signed Sunday.The measure requires at least one female director on the board of each California-based public corporation by the end of next year. Companies would need up to three female directors by the end of 2021, depending on the number of board seats.The Democratic governor referenced the objections and legal concerns that the law has raised. The California Chamber of Commerce has said the policy will be difficult for companies to implement and violates constitutional prohibitions against discrimination.“I don’t minimize the potential flaws that indeed may prove fatal to its ultimate implementation,” Brown wrote in a signing statement. “Nevertheless, recent events in Washington, D.C. — and beyond — make it crystal clear that many are not getting the message.”Gov. Jerry Brown reviews a measure with staff members Camille Wagner, left, Graciela Castillo-Krings at his Capitol office, Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018, in Sacramento, Calif. Sunday is the last day for Brown to approve or veto bills passed by the legislature. Brown, who will be leaving office in January, is acting on some on the last pieces of legislation in his tenure as governor. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)It is one of several measures affecting women that Brown signed Sunday, his last opportunity to approve or veto laws before the term-limited governor leaves office. He also approved legislation requiring smaller employers to provide sexual harassment training and banning secret settlements related to sexual assault and harassment.But he vetoed a bill that would have required California’s public universities to provide medication for abortion at campus health centers, saying the services are already “widely available” off campus.Brown’s actions come as the #MeToo movement against sexual misconduct led to a reckoning nationwide that has ousted men from power. The latest high-profile allegations are against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, who has denied decades-old claims of sexual misconduct from three women.The author of the California measure on corporate boards, SB 826, said she believes having more women in power could help reduce sexual assault and harassment in the workplace.Having more women on the boards also will make companies more successful, state Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson said. Women tend to be more collaborative and are better at multitasking, the Santa Barbara Democrat said.A fourth of publicly held corporations with headquarters in California don’t have any women on their boards of directors. These companies have not done enough to increase the number of women on their boards despite the Legislature’s urging, making government intervention necessary, Jackson said.“This is one of the last bastions of total male domination,” she said. “We know that the public and business are not being well-served by this level of discrimination.”The California Chamber of Commerce argued that the composition of corporate boards should be determined internally, not mandated by government. The chamber said the new law will prioritize gender over other aspects of diversity, such as race and ethnicity.“It creates a challenge for a board on achieving broader diversity goals,” said Jennifer Barrera, senior vice president for policy at the chamber.The law applies to companies that report having their principal executive offices in California. Companies can be fined $100,000 for a first violation and $300,000 for subsequent violations.The law also requires companies to report their board composition to the California secretary of state and imposes a $100,000 fine if a company fails to do so.Some European countries, including Norway and France, already mandate that corporate boards include women.Brown stopped short on Sunday of making California the first state to mandate public colleges and universities offer abortion medication at their health centers. A bill by Democratic Sen. Connie Leyva would have required all 34 University of California and California State University campuses to make the drugs available at their health centers by 2022.The public schools now refer students to outside providers. Abortion rights advocates said that made it difficult for women without a car and also expensive because many private providers do not accept student insurance.A group of private donors, some of them anonymous, had vowed to pay for up to $20 million in startup costs, including ultrasound equipment and training for both medical and billing staff.Abortions using medication are induced by taking two pills, which can be given up to 10 weeks into a pregnancy. One pill is administered in the clinic and a second drug is taken later at home. The drugs induce bleeding similar to a miscarriage.Leyva vowed to reintroduce the bill under California’s next governor; Brown is leaving office early next year.“I am hopeful that our incoming Legislature and governor will agree that the right to choose isn’t just a slogan, but rather a commitment to improving true access to abortion for students across California,” she said in a statement.__Associated Press writer Julie Watson in San Diego contributed. FacebookTwitterlast_img read more