SUP Rejects Tuition Increment

first_imgThe Student Unification Party (SUP) of the University of Liberia on Wednesday issued a press statement rejecting tuition increment announced by the university administration.SUP declared that it will be a violation of the fiscal policy of the University should the increment take effect in the second semester of the academic year.SUP chairman Jerome D. Dangbuah said 95% of the students attending the state owned university are unemployed. “Therefore, 85% of the students depend on scholarships,” he said, “and any increment will cause many of them to drop out of school.”He said presently University of Liberia students are confronted with the lack of internet facilities, transportation, inadequate infrastructure and the absence of other basic social services that the administration must tackle before increasing tuition.According him, students over the years have paid for ID cards, computer literacy, t-shirts and other services that the administration has not been able to provide. Dangbuah reminded the administration that the University of Liberia was created by a Legislative Act which made it not for profit making.He said University of Liberia has the challenge to train more manpower for the various disciplines to improve the living standard of Liberians.Dangbuah meanwhile called on the National Legislature to increase the state-owned university’s fiscal budgetary appropriation from US$15.1 million to US$ 29 million.On the administration’s decision to increase tuition, he said SUP, representing the students, was not part of consultations that led to the decision to increase tuition.Dangbuah explained that already many students are finding it difficult to pay their tuition at the regular LD$175 per credit hour.He called on UL students to remain calm as efforts are underway to petition the National Legislature with their concerns for redress.It may be recalled that last Tuesday the UL Administration announced tuition increase from LD$175.00 per credit hour to USD$4 for undergraduate programs and US$55 to USD$75 for the Master’s degree program.Senator Jewel Howard Taylor, who is the chair person of the Board of Trustees, welcomed the administration’s decision. She said if the University of Liberia must be on par with other universities in Africa, then money is needed.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

ESL Shipping Seals Acquisition of AtoBC Shipping

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: ESL Shipping Finnish dry bulk shipping company ESL Shipping has completed the acquisition of all the outstanding shares of AtoB@C Shipping AB and AtoB@C Holding AB, announced at the end of June.As a result, the company expects its net sales to double from EUR 80 million to approximately EUR 160 million. Based on the calculations using figures from 2017, the cargo volume carried is expected to increase from approximately 11-12 million tonnes to approximately 16-17 million tonnes.As disclosed earlier, the value of the acquired enterprise is EUR 30 million (USD 34.9 million). The  purchase was financed by Aspo’s existing financing reserves, and new shares issued by Aspo Plc, the owner of ESL Shipping.AtoB@C operates 30 vessels in size of 4,000-5,000 tonnes. The company owns six dry cargo vessels in full, and has a share of 49% of two vessels. The other 22 vessels are time-chartered.The combination of vessels will bring ESL Shipping’s fleet to a total of 50 ships, including new LNG-powered ships, with a deadweight capacity of 468,000 tonnes compared to the previous 331,000 tonnes.“Together we form a strong Nordic shipping company that is customer-driven. It has strong shoulders to build future success determinedly,” Mikki Koskinen, Managing Director of ESL Shipping, commented.” The acquisition will shift ESL Shipping to a new size class and put it in a good position to improve operational efficiency and overall profitability of the shipping company,” says Aki Ojanen, CEO of Aspo Plc and Chairman of the Board of Directors of ESL Shipping, said.last_img read more

Theres More To Measuring An Olympic Course Than Just Measuring It

If, like me, you thought measuring a race course — marathon, race walk or otherwise — was as simple as driving a car around the circuit, you would be mocked by Katz and company. Turns out that a car’s odometer is fairly imprecise and that the preferred method of course measurement is much more artisanal. It requires only a calculator, 100-meter steel tape, a bicycle fitted with a GPS, and a device called a Jones Counter, which counts the rotations of the bike’s front axle — almost exactly 11,000 “counts” per kilometer.To calibrate the bike for the official course measurement, Katz used the steel tape to measure out 300 meters on the course, taking into account any possible expansion or contraction of the tape from the day’s temperature (there’s an adjustment coefficient for that). Then Katz rode the bike back and forth from Point A to Point B to see how many counts of the Jones Counter occurred over that 300 meter mark. Voilà! The bike was ready to track the rest of the course.“It’s very simple — I can teach you everything that I know about measuring if you have 15 minutes,” Katz told me. So then what makes him so good? “I’m a little bit more detail-oriented; I’m an official pain in the ass,” he said.It’s not quite as simple as Katz lets on, but it is a simpler method than I expected from the person ultimately responsible for ensuring that any records set in road races at the Olympics are in fact records. “He’s exactly the person whom we need for a high stakes measurement like the Olympics,” said Imre Mátraházi, the technical manager of the competitions department of the International Association of Athletics Federations, the international governing body for track and field.The trickiest part of course measurement, said Katz, is cutting the tangents. These can be corners or other parts of the course where athletes could find a shorter route. “If I was going to race you down the road for a million dollars and the road undulates, how are you going to run?” Katz asked. “You’re going to take the shortest path.”During the official measurement process, Katz biked the course, usually less than a foot away from the curb or barricades, to make sure that an athlete couldn’t physically run anything less than the course he’s measuring. He did it several times, biking every possible route that someone could take on the course to ensure that none is too short. But there’s an extra precaution built in as well, known as the short course prevention factor: All international races must be an extra 0.1 percent long — meaning today’s 50 kilometer course is actually 50.05 km, or an extra 50 meters long. Photograph by Allison McCann David Katz is the official course measurer for the race walk at the Rio Olympics. Allison McCann Katz has had help at this Olympics, as is customary, from a Brazilian husband and wife, members of the organizing committee for the Rio Games. They did the initial measurements before Katz came through with the final verdict. “My measurement came out a little better than their measurement,” Katz said matter-of-factly, but he praised their work too. “They are top-notch measurers.”With just over an hour left in the race walk, everything was going smoothly — no London race walk barricade disasters, at least. The current world record holder — France’s Yohann Diniz — was on pace to break that record (he would eventually fade well off pace). At the 25-km mark, he was almost 2 minutes ahead of Slovakia’s Matej Tóth, who eventually won. No world records were broken, so it’s unlikely that someone will re-measure Katz’s course after the Olympics are over. “I’m scared stiff about making a mistake; I double-check everything,” Katz said. But when I asked him whether he’s ever made one, he can’t remember a time he has. Photograph by Allison McCann We’re on the ground in Rio covering the 2016 Summer Olympics. Check out all our coverage here.RIO DE JANEIRO — It’s 7 a.m. The sun has barely risen, but for the better part of an hour, David Katz has been riding his bike around the course for the men’s 50-kilometer race walk later this morning. “More, more, more!” he shouts in the direction of a crew of guys arranging cones on the course, unhappy with the gaps around the second turn. Authority radiates from his neon orange vest, which reads: ROAD COURSE MEASURER.This is not Katz’s first Olympic course measurement rodeo. Or his second or third. He was the official marathon and race walk course measurer for the 2012 London Olympics (there’s only one official measurer, tasked with ensuring that the length of a road course is measured to spec, but usually several others help) and is back again in that role in Rio. He’s been involved with Olympic course measuring as far back as the 1984 Games in Los Angeles. And he’s been organizing and measuring road course races in New York in his spare time for more than 40 years.He’s a bit of a legend, as far as course measurement nerds go. “He is one of the best in the world,” said Wang Tak Fung of Hong Kong, a 20-year veteran of the course measurement game who came early to the race walk event to watch Katz in action. He seemed very impressed that Katz had lugged his steel measuring tape with him — a necessity only during official measurements (which were done weeks ago) and not for this morning’s slight tweaks and adjustments. The day of the race isn’t for official measuring; it’s for double-checking that the measurement is still accurate even after cones, barricades and water tables have been added to the course.“Not too many people do a measurement like that, but I will do it right before the start of the race,” said Katz, a retired science teacher who lives on Long Island in New York. His attention to detail can be heard in every one of his shouts toward race organizers. He wasn’t pleased with the placement of the cones around the second turn of the race walk — they were creating too sharp an angle — so he rolled out his tape measurer (just a regular one) and adjusted them, ensuring that “no athlete has to compete for one extra centimeter.” read more

Pala man saves dog from burning house

first_imgPala man saves dog from burning house March 12, 2019 Sasha Foo, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsPALA (KUSI) – The fire that tore through Jose Guzman’s home in Pala destroyed almost everything his family owned, except for one thing, their dog.In cell phone video that’s gone viral, Guzman is seen rushing past firefighters and into his burning home in a frantic search for his dog. Fighting heavy smoke, Guzman ran to the back and found Gabbana still on her leash, but crouched inside the bathroom, the only room that had not burned.As the video shows, only a few moments later, both of them emerge, running out of the property to safety.With his adrenaline pumping, Guzman said he did not realize that he had been burned on his face and arms, until the rescue was over. His two and a half year old dog was singed on her nose and paws.In the blaze, Jose, his wife and three daughters lost almost all their possessions, including the tools that Jose uses for work.Guzman works two jobs, in construction, and as a landscaper. However, amid the rubble and ruin, Guzman said he sees the blessings. He has his family and their love, including the love of one family member who can’t put her appreciation into words.When asked what does the dog mean to him, he told us with his voice choking up with emotion, “She’s been with us forever. She’s part of the family. We love her.”You can help the Guzman family recover from the fire by donating to their GoFundMe page ( https://bit.ly/2VRoMne ). Categories: Local San Diego News, Traffic & Accidents FacebookTwittercenter_img Updated: 4:33 PM Posted: March 12, 2019 Sasha Foo last_img read more

Penthouse Plans 250M IPO

first_imgPlayboy’s stock price closed at $7.77 per share Thursday, down more than 30 percent from its 52-week high of $11.85 in October.Led by CEO Marc Bell, the company has tried to reposition the magazine—long thought to be a seedier version of Playboy—to compete with Hugh Hefner’s brand juggernaut.”We put the magazine back to its roots, where it used to be,” Bell told Reuters Wednesday. “We made it a young man’s magazine, slightly edgier pictorially than Playboy.”It’s a category that is hemorrhaging at the moment.Playboy said last month that it expects a 30 percent decline in advertising revenue during the first quarter of 2008. Playboy publishing group’s net revenue was $93.8 million in 2007, down from $97.1 million in 2006. The grim advertising projection came on the heels of its Audit Bureau of Circulations Fas-Fax statement, which indicated that single copy sales of the magazine fell 35.8 percent during the second half of 2007. Total circulation fell from 3,001,723 to 2,700,262—a 10 percent drop.Total paid circulation for Maxim, a magazine both Penthouse and Playboy purport to compete with, was flat. Penthouse’s average paid circulation was 350,000 during the second half of 2007, down three percent over the second half of 2006, according to ABC. Penthouse’s single copy sales—which make up roughly a third of its total paid circulation—were down 11 percent.Bell bought Penthouse in 2005. Penthouse Media Group has announced their intent to register for an initial public offering with the Securities and Exchange Commission during the second quarter of 2008.The Boca Raton, Florida-based publisher plans to offer $250 million worth of stock in order to pay down its debt.The company has been aggressive in the digital space. Penthouse Media Group acquired 25 Web sites, including adultfriendfinder.com, for some $500 million in December. (Penthouse projected the acquisition would put its annual revenue at $340 million. Playboy’s 2007 revenues were $339.8 million.)last_img read more

Overdrive Takes Top Honors at 60th Annual Neal Awards

first_imgThe Randall-Reilly Publishing Company took top honors at the 60th Annual Jesse H. Neal Awards as its Overdrive, The Voice of the American Trucker, brand received the Grand Neal Award during the ABM ceremony held March 14 in New York City.Overdrive’s entry, “CSA’s Data Trail” beat out 612 other submissions including three other finalists—“Project: Blackbird” from MTG Media Group’s Plate magazine, IEEE Media’s IEEE Spectrum’s “The Age of Plenty” and “Videos by Crain’s New York Business” by Crain Communications’ Crain’s New York Business. “This is the kind of committed, analytical reporting where the line between b2b and public service disappears into great journalism,” said Stats.org editor Trevor Butterworth of the winning entry. Butterworth, who presented the award to close the ceremony, was also head judge of this year’s Neal Awards judging board. The other three nominees for Grand Neal still managed to pick up some hardware during the afternoon ceremony, especially Plate’s editor Chandra Ram who was named the 2014 McAllister Editorial Fellow. MTG Media Group picked up a trio of other awards including Best Profile for a Class A publisher for “Project: Blackbird” for which Ram contributed.Despite not nabbing the Grand Neal, parent companies IEEE Media and Crain Communications both picked up a total seven awards each at this year’s ceremony, dominating most categories.Other special awards were given to Robert Cassidy, editorial director of Building Design+Construction, who was the winner of the 46th Annual G.D. Grain, Jr. Award for distinguished editorial excellence and Michael Fabey, editorial editor of Aviation Week, who received the 2014 Timothy White Award for Editorial Integrity.Both Fabey and Cassidy were visibly moved by their achievements and thanked their family for their support throughout their careers, as well as jabbed a little at the industry heavy hitters who put profit over journalistic accountability.“Part of our job is to help our companies make money, but our role and responsibility is to make a difference,” Fabey told the audience.In honor of the 60th anniversary celebration, the Neal Awards singled out the winningest publication and author in its lengthy history. Marianne Dekker Mattera, managing editor of MedPage Today, was honored for her 18 Neal Awards wins writing in the healthcare field. She previously won the G.D. Crain, Jr. Award in 1997. Also, McGraw Hill Financial’s Architectural Record was given a special award for its record 28 wins, including a 2012 Grand Neal prize.Click here to view a full list of winners and finalists for the 2014 Neal Awards.last_img read more

1105s Ed Tech Magazine Returns to Print After 2 DigitalOnly Years

first_img T.H.E. Journal, 1105 Media’s magazine about K-12 education technology, is doing just that though. The title, which scrapped its print edition in 2012, will debut its new print edition at a related 1105 trade show in late January. Despite marketing leading digital offerings, in a competitive landscape with six other print magazines, T.H.E. Journal’s sales team was short a tool that every other rival had, Allain says. The return of print is paying immediate dividends. The 38-page inaugural issue has a 50-50 ad edit ratio—”significantly higher” than it had been for digital-only editions, according to Christopher Piehler, the magazine’s editor-in-chief. Along with the print relaunch, circulation will double: 50,000 print issues will accompany the 50,000 digital editions currently being sent out. Frequency will be cut from monthly to 7x however, to more closely align with the segment’s active seasons, Allain says. Digital-to-print launches like Allrecipes, POLITICO Magazine and The Pitchfork Review are becoming increasingly common, but it’s rare when a brand that decided to abandon ink and paper returns to it.center_img “When I talk to the connected educators who make up our audience, they say that their computer desktop is more crowded than their literal desktop. For these people, whose job is to grapple constantly with a barrage of emails, texts and tweets, reading something in print can be a way to relax and really focus,” Piehler says. “We did a survey that showed reader interest, but for me the most powerful motivation came when a member of my editorial board said to me, ‘You know, I hate to admit it, but I read the magazine more when it was in print.'”More on this topic 1105 Media to Publish Microsoft’s MSDN, TechNet Magazines Branding Push, Client Needs Spawn New 1105 Media Division 1105 Enterprise Computing Group Launches Marketing Services Division 1105 Media Hires Tech Exec as CEO Digital Editions: Are They About to Catch Fire? Hanley Wood, 1105 Media Start the Year Off with AcquisitionsJust In The Atlantic Names New Global Marketing Head | People on the Move Four More Execs Depart SourceMedia in Latest Restructuring Bonnier Corp. Terminates Editor-in-Chief for Ethics Breach BabyCenter Sold to Ziff Davis Parent J2 Media | News & Notes This Just In: Magazines Are Not TV Networks Editor & Publisher Magazine Sold to Digital Media ConsultantPowered by “When the decision was made to cease the publication in print, it was based on indicators that digital-only strategies were growing in popularity with advertisers,” says 1105’s COO, Henry Allain. “We discovered that may be true in some markets, but clearly not in the K-12 ed-tech space. This segment of the market continues to have a vibrant print offering…We needed to be back as part of the mix.” “In this market segment many agencies and marketers are committed to integrated buys,” he says. “We found ourselves at a disadvantage when we didn’t offer print as one component of the buy…It was a bit frustrating for the sales team to have to continually deal with the question: ‘Where is the print component of this proposal?'”last_img read more

Taunton Press Eliminates 40 Positions

first_imgAlmost one month after taking over as CEO on a permanent basis, Dan McCarthy announced via a LinkedIn post today that Taunton Press has eliminated 40 staff positions at the company. McCarthy’s post: “Tough day at Taunton Press; eliminated the roles of 40 talented & passionate people as part of trimming product lineup. Thank you to every one of them for all the hard work. Our path ahead will emphasize product strategies that build loyalty among our customers and deliver value to our advertisers. We remain committed to each of our markets and our bellwether brands in woodworking, homebuilding, cooking, sewing and gardening.” After working with Taunton senior management as a consultant for several months to explore ways to boost revenues, McCarthy took the helm as interim CEO in January when then-president Tim Rahr announced he was stepping down. Taunton officially named McCarthy to the CEO spot in mid-April. According to a source, the cuts represent about 20 percent of the workforce,  were widespread and not limited to a particular brand or department. There are no plans to discontinue any brands.last_img read more

Tyndall AFB Update Officials Allowing Personnel who Reside OffBase to Return to

first_imgTyndall officials lifted the evacuation order for active-duty military and civilian personnel who live off-base, provided the municipality where they reside doesn’t have any outstanding restrictions in place. Personnel who return to their permanent residences, however, will no longer be eligible for safe haven allowances, according to a press release. “This is a personal choice,” it states. The base’s evacuation order remains in effect and it is not open for regular operations. Separately, about 600 airmen are living on Tyndall, working on recovery efforts, reports the 325th Fighter Wing.Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Lotz Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img

Hot or not Flirs thermal AV camera gets upgraded at CES 2019

first_img Share your voice 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Self-driving cars 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better More From Roadshow Post a comment CES 2019center_img Auto Tech Tags When people talk about sensors for self-driving cars, they usually focus on the ones most often talked about: lidar, ultrasonic (parking) sensors and good old-fashioned cameras. Flir came to CES 2019 to tell everyone that we’re still missing something.Flir, a company that specializes in thermal imaging, came to CES 2019 to show off its second-generation thermal camera development kit. The whole point of the kit is to provide a simple solution for adding thermal recognition to an existing autonomous vehicle platform. This isn’t something for you or me, unless you’re an AV platform developer — this is largely for suppliers and companies.So why care about thermal? According to Flir, it’s all about adding an extra layer of mapping to pick up things that other parts of a sensor suite might miss. The company says its infrared camera can detect objects in conditions that would befuddle other types of sensors, like when there’s fog or excessive glare from the sun. In theory, the system could detect a car solely by picking up on the heat signatures generated from the friction between its tires and the road.Enlarge ImageFlir’s hardware can connect to existing AV platforms using USB or ethernet, but you’ll need a few, since each camera works in just a single direction. Flir Redundancy is a big theme in autonomy — making sure the car can continually fall back on other systems if the initial ones have troubles — so consider this camera a little extra peace of mind. The window of the camera is even heated, to help its functionality in adverse weather conditions.To help showcase its tech in something tangible, Flir brought an entire autonomous vehicle to CES 2019, too. Flir’s AV is equipped with its own infrared cameras in addition to the standard collection of cameras, lidar and radar. Flir’s hardware is integrated into the autonomous emergency braking system, offering another layer of protection against a collision. Thermal is an oft-overlooked corner of AV development, so it’ll be interesting to see where Flir’s cameras end up as automakers and suppliers continue to refine their platforms.flir-thermal-camera-2Enlarge ImageFlir’s demonstration car doesn’t look all that different from other modern AV development mules — except, of course, it has a few more cameras slapped on top. Flir Self-driving cars: Stay up to date on all the latest news in autonomy.CES 2019: Check out our favorite gadgets from the show in this constantly updating gallery. 0 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealouslast_img read more