Delta’s new flight museum

first_imgMuseums, the best of them, tell a story. And the story the new Delta Flight Museum tells is dramatic. Tracing the history of one airline, the 68,000 square-foot facility, located on the northern reaches of Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport, manages to illuminate – in meticulous detail – the history of the airline industry as a whole. It does that by looking at Delta’s legacy, the constituent carriers that coalesced to form a global powerhouse. Northwest, Northeast, Western and Pan Am are all represented, as are other smaller airlines.The non-profit museum (there’s an admission fee) unfolds the saga via interactive information kiosks and assorted airline artifacts, the most compelling of which is a squadron of actual airliners. Out front Delta’s parked a 757-200, and a DC-9-50, both painted in the carrier’s classic “widget” livery. But it’s inside hangars One and Two respectively that the real show plays out.Enter the museum and take an immediate right turn. The first thing that catches your eye is an immaculately restored DC-3 proplliner – Ship 41, tail number NC2834. Take a while to drink in the classic design of the airplane. It’s polished bare-metal reflects the rays of sunlight that filter in the expansive hangar bay.Up ahead is a five-passenger, 90 mph Travel Air – the craft that launched Delta’s first passenger service between Dallas and Jackson, Mississippi. The Propeller Age artifacts arrayed in Hangar One include a toy Western Air Express bi-plane for the kids to play in. This AirlineRatings’ author’s grandchildren were fascinated by it. It was a tough to pry them away. They oohed and aahed and giggled and I explained to them how airplanes fly.Over along the far wall of Hangar One is a visual playground for adult aviation enthusiasts: early airline schedules from the carriers with which Delta merged, route maps that etch the carrier’s first east/west routes across the American South, cotton balls and chewing gum issued to flyers of an earlier era to muffle the sound of the piston engine and equalize pressure on their ears.Hangar Two houses the star of the show: a Boeing 767-200, The Spirit of Delta. Employees purchased the airplane for the carrier by raising $30 million.Enter the ship and grab a seat in first class. No charge for the upgrade. Peak inside the cockpit or head to the tail, along the way taking in displays of pilot and flight attendant uniforms of the early jet age.Down below, on the ground floor, get a preflight checklist and perform a walk around inspection of the massive seven-six, the way the first officer (co-pilot) does. A pamphlet lays out your beneath-the belly route, explaining each step in layman’s terms. By the time you reach the tail and crane your neck up at the elevators (which make the aircraft ascend and descend) you’ll have a decent idea of the fundamentals of flight.If the star of the show is the 767, the sexiest exhibit is the Boeing 737-200 flight simulator. The museum says it’s the only real full-motion flight “sim” open to the public in the United States. Take a look inside at no extra charge. “Fly” the seven-three for 45 minutes for US$395. You’ll have to call ahead for reservations.While the Delta Flight Museum isn’t far from Delta headquarters, it’s not immediately adjacent to the mid-field terminal complex of the world’s busiest airport. If you’re passing through ATL and want to see it best bet is to grab a cab.Find out more about the museum by going to the Web site at www.deltamuseum.org . Contact them via e-mail at museum.delta@delta.com. The phone number is 1-404-715-7886.The Delta Flight Museum won’t be mistaken for Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. But what it does, it does exceptionally well. If you’ve got a long layover in Atlanta you could spend your precious time in far less fascinating fashion.last_img read more

Career guidance initiative launched

first_imgNedbank and Primestars are joined byPPC Cement, Gauteng City RegionAcademy, Quest, the South AfricanInstitute of Chartered Accountants,the National Youth DevelopmentAgency and the JD Group assponsors of the programme. Martin Sweet says the project is aimedat inspiring youngsters to play a key rolein overcoming the current projected skillsshortage and the high rate ofunemployment in South Africa.(Images: Ray Maota) MEDIA CONTACTS • Nkosinathi MsizaSenior Communications ManagerNedbank+27 11 295 3560RELATED ARTICLES• Nedbank invests in water project• Nedbank branch runs on wind power• Pens for needy children • Education goes mobile with Vodacom• Can drive raises R8.5m for educationRay MaotaNedbank, one of South Africa’s big four banks, has launched a career guidance initiative for underprivileged high school students that will benefit more than 40 000 pupils in grades 9 to 12 across the country.The launch took place at the Michelangelo Towers hotel on Nelson Mandela Square in Sandton on 15 February 2012, emceed by popular 5FM radio and television presenters, Anele Mdoda and Gareth Cliff.Early career guidanceIn the third year of this initiative, the bank will invest more than R5-million in its My Future My Career programme. It will promote more than 100 career choices across 14 industries and will enable the pupils to discover the academic as well as personality requirements of each career.The students will gain insight into these careers through movie episodes shown at Ster-Kinekor theatres around the country. They will also learn from professionals in the working world what to expect in these careers.Kone Gugushe, Nedbank’s divisional executive for corporate social responsibility, said: “Time and again we see too many students showing up at universities without a clue of what they want to and, more importantly, can study,” Gugushe said.He added that the programme will give students insight into careers and improve the prospects of developing skills in critical sectors such as financial services, health and engineering.The programme, which is endorsed by the Department of Basic Education, was conceptualised by Primestars Marketing, which is also the project manager.Martin Sweet, managing director of Primestars Marketing, said that the project hopes to inspire youngsters to play a key role in overcoming the current projected skills shortage and the high rate of unemployment in South Africa.Through the programme, young people will also be encouraged to explore and take full advantage of the career opportunities.Nedbank and Primestars are joined by PPC Cement, Gauteng City Region Academy, Quest, the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants, the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) and the JD Group as sponsors of the programme.Where to catch the screeningsScreenings will include the following careers: accounting, law, entrepreneurship, mining and engineering, education, health, IT, construction, travel and tourism. Each pupil who attends a screening will leave with a reference booklet on that particular career.The screenings start on 26 February, with the subjects of entrepreneurship and tourism; on 4 March, it is the turn of IT and communications; on 11 March, mining, engineering and construction; on 18 March, banking, finance and accounting; on 15 April, criminal justice and law; on 22 April, health services and education; and on 29 April, arts and culture, and transport, logistics and distribution.They will take place at various theatres countrywide – in Gauteng at Brooklyn in Pretoria; at Eastgate; Sandton; Maponya Mall; Southgate; Eastrand Mall and Westgate in Johannesburg; in Northern Cape at North Cape Mall in Kimberley; in Free State at Mimosa Mall in Bloemfontein; in North West at Rustenburg; in Limpopo at Savannah Mall in Polokwane; and in Kwazulu-Natal at Gateway and Musgrave in Durban.In Western Cape pupils can catch the screenings at Cape Gate and Cavendish in Cape Town; while in the Eastern Cape, they will be at The Bridge in Port Elizabeth and Vincent Park in East London.“The JD Group realises the challenges and the effects of unemployment in South Africa, particularly among the youth of the country. It is with this mind that we partnered with the My Future, My Career initiative,” said Richard Chauke, a director at JD Group.These career episodes will also be screened at 13 NYDA youth centres across the country.The Nedbank FoundationThe Nedbank Foundation is the primary corporate social investment arm of Nedbank.Early this year it launched its Back to School campaign at Ga-Masemola village in Limpopo, where 150 pupils from four schools in the area received essential school items such as uniforms, shoes, stationery, books, bags and sports kits, to start their school year on a high note.It also has other projects that benefit underprivileged students, such as the Nedbank Fundisa Maths and Science Project, under which maths and science teachers in Eastern Cape and Limpopo are enrolled at Unisa for a one-year course on improving their classroom teaching techniques.The foundation also runs the Nedbank Mobile Library Project, the Matric Exam Revision Programme, and the M2 Mathematics Project.last_img read more

Control What Is In Your Control – Episode 205

first_imgIf much in your business is outside of your control, you need to be wicked gooad at what is in your control. You can communicate. You can hustle. And you can care!last_img

Sourav Ganguly at Youth Summit: “I want to coach Indian team”

first_imgFormer India captain Sourav Ganguly has said on Saturday that he would like to be the coach of the Indian team, if such an opportunity comes his way. “Though it’s not my immediate goal, I will like to coach the national team. It will be a great honour,” Ganguly said on Saturday while addressing the India Today Youth Summit in Delhi. He will, however, like to do things differently from former India coach Greg Chappell because of which he had to lose his captaincy and later his place in the team. “I think the captain is the boss of the team, the coach should remain backstage,” he said.In the session Going For Broke chaired by Headlines Today Executive Editor Rahul Kanwal, Ganguly said his coaching will revolve around five central rules: friendly relations with media, no use of media to sideline a player, being honest with players, work with the players, gaining their confidence and staying at the backstage. On being asked what keeps him going, the Bengal Tiger said that the love for the game inspired him to make several comebacks. “After I was dropped from the team in 2006, even my father thought I would not get any chance. But I had faith in myself. I still get high when I score runs,” he said. He admitted cricket was not his first choice. Like most Bengali teenagers, his first love was football. But injuries forced him to give up football and he turned to the game he would rule when he was in Class IX. “My elder brother played cricket, so I started going out with him to play. That’s how it began,” said Ganguly. He also said that his cricketing journey, filled with so many ups and downs, has moulded his character. It has taught him that winning was not always everything. “Of course people expect you to win every time, and you can’t move ahead if you don’t deliver, but the most important part is the amount of struggle you go through to achieve your goal.” he said, “There are more bad days in sports than good ones. But people remember the good days only.” He said that failures have made him a better person. On being asked how it felt to sit out of the team, Ganguly said that it was like a punch to his face. “When I was out of the team, the newspapers made me feel like everything I had done for Team India was wrong. Then I got picked up after six months and suddenly people said there was none better than me. That’s when I realised winning is not everything,” he said adding that “it’s not important how many times you fall, but how you get up every time”. He advised youngsters not to worry much about winning as that adds pressure.  “If you are honest to you profession, some day you will surely win.” The southpaw also praised the efforts of boxer Mary Kom who despite several hardships and obstacles has brought glory to the country by becoming World Woman Boxing Champion five times in a row. The most successful Indian captain ever, Ganguly attributed his success to his teammates. “A team-mate is as good as his team. I had so many talented players in the team and they delivered. We must remember cricket is a team game.” Among all the captains he played under he singles out Tendulkar as the best. “Everyone, including my father, points to Tendulkar’s captaincy record when I say this, but I really blossomed as a cricketer under Sachin,” he said. Ganguly, who opened in ODIs with Tendulkar, said that he considered the 60-plus partnerships with the master blaster as the most memorable in his career. “After we lost to Australia in the World Cup 2003, there was a huge public reaction against our dismal performance. Our next match was against Zimbabwe and I was very tense. Tendulkar came up to me and said that it was the most crucial game of his life and we must win it. It was a small partnership, but it changed our course in the World Cup and we reached the final,” he said. On being asked if he could do something differently in the 2003 World Cup final, he said, “I wish we could bowl better. Every time I asked Zaheer to bowl a particular delivery, he did the opposite.” He also admitted that his tactic of keeping former Australian captain Steve Waugh waiting for him during the toss was a deliberate one. “It was my way of being at the same level as they were.” He also recounted his encounter with Steve Waugh the very next year at Brisbane where Waugh had asked him, “Could you be on time for the toss this time?” “Only if you stop writing,” replied Ganguly. Clearly in a mood to interact with the youngsters present at the summit, Ganguly was at his wittiest best. “Was hitting sixes against leg spinners your success mantra,” asked one delegate to which Ganguly replied, “It was my way of venting out my frustration after facing the fire from the Pollocks and Bret Lees.” On being asked how he had felt after taking off his shirt at the Lord balcony after India had won the NatWest series against England, he said, “I felt cold as it was very cold in London.” He also said that he might take off his shirt again if Kolkata Knight Riders win the IPL. Ganguly believes that Indian cricketers are not involved in match-fixing. He however refused to agree that it’s not about Pakistani players only. “The bookies know who to approach. They observe the players, their behaviours and how they speak to the press or on TV.” On being asked how he dealt with the match fixing crisis after he took over the reigns of Team India in 2000, he said, “Almost all the players were new. So we made a fresh beginning. We did not talk about it. I did not have to deal with it much.” Ganguly also sees no wrong in politicians managing sports. “If their intentions are right, anyone can manage sports. But it’s better if administration is managed by politicians and the sports aspect by players,” he said. The former India captain believes that the Commonwealth Games in India will pass off successfully. “India has the huge ability of surviving disasters. It’s not okay to blame one person for what is happening. If it fails, all are to be blamed.”advertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

Tiger Pataudi- the born leader

first_imgM.A.K. Pataudi, who passed away on Thursday in Delhi, was a born leader – someone who defied the odds to emerge as one of India’s most successful captains.After 12 captains in a decade and half, there was a crying need for a stable, unbiased, charismatic captain in the 1960s. It is at this stage that Pataudi made his entry on the national scene. With the seniors unwilling to take on the responsibility, a 21-year-old Tiger, just three Tests old, suddenly found himself installed as the team’s skipper in March 1962.Though few knew it then, a new era in Indian cricket had begun – the Pataudi era.Even with his visual impairment, he showed the foresight of a champion.After becoming the youngest captain in the world, he made some bold moves that went on to define his leadership. In a first in world cricket at that time, it was Pataudi who had the guts to employ the spin quartet.Against conventional thinking, as had become customary with him, Pataudi regularly used three spinners against the opposition, realising India’s only chance lay in playing to their strengths.The Nawab of Indian cricket led India in 40 off the 46 Tests he played between 1961 & 71, leading India to nine famous victories to make him India’s most successful leader for a long time to come.Fittingly, it was under his captaincy that India clinched their first Test series win on foreign soil, when they defeated New Zealand 3-1 in 1967-68.Sixties was the decade when Indian cricket started becoming a force to reckon with. Be it the formation of the famous spin-quartet or the ushering in of a vast improvement in the fielding or the forging of a winning spirit in a disarrayed team, Mansur Ali Khan Pataudi was at the head of them all.advertisementHe was called Tiger not for nothing. It wasn’t just a name, it was an attitude.last_img read more