GALLERY: UP Fighting Maroons return to UAAP Finals after 32 years

first_imgSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum ‘Mia’: Rom-com with a cause a career-boosting showcase for Coleen Garcia With odds stacked against them against the no. 2 seed Adamson, which held a twice-to-beat advantage in the Final Four, UP showed what fighting was all about, winning two straight to knock out Adamson and enter the title round for the first time since 1986.READ: UP Maroons head to first UAAP finals stint in 32 years, knocks out AdamsonFEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissThe 89-87 overtime win on Wednesday was nothing but an emotional moment for the players, the coaching staff and the UP fans.Take a look at some of the images of triumph and despair after today’s game courtesy of Inquirer Sports photographer Tristan Tamayo. MOST READ No.13 lucky for Orlando Bloom Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college The decision on the Maguindanao Massacre case PLAY LIST 03:22The decision on the Maguindanao Massacre case03:13SEA Games 2019: PH’s Carlo Paalam boxing light flyweight semi final (HIGHLIGHTS)01:10Maguindanao massacre victims’ kin eagerly awaiting justice, says lawyer02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazilcenter_img Column: Deontay Wilder and Tyson Fury step up in heavyweight title fight LATEST STORIES In long-awaited moment for the UP faithful, the Fighting Maroons have returned to the UAAP men’s basketball finals after more than three decades.The Fighting Maroons had spent a number of years in the cellar but with a change in culture in the past few years and bright recruits, they were able to turn a slow start at 1-3 into a finals appearance to remember in Season 81.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.net Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew After winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk View commentslast_img read more

Swansea captain condemns Eden Hazard after ballboy clash

first_imgSwansea captain Ashley Williams condemned Eden Hazard for the incident which led to the Chelsea man being sent off during the Capital One Cup semi-final clash at the Liberty Stadium.Chelsea, 2-0 down from the first leg, missed out on a trip to Wembley after the second leg ended in a goalless draw.And Hazard was red-carded with 10 minutes remaining after kicking out at a ball boy who appeared to refuse to give the ball back after it went out of play.“Demba Ba told me the ball boy held onto it but I saw him kick him and you can’t do that to a young boy,” Williams told Sky Sports.Swansea manager Michael Laudrup said: “I think Hazard, who is a great player, will regret it when he sees it.“The ball boy should have let the ball go but he was pushed first and then he kicks him.“As a player when you are behind your pulse is very high and sometimes you say and do things, you overreact, but there are some things you cannot do.”More reaction to follow later.See also:Swans hold off Chelsea to reach WembleyBenitez again blames missed 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Career guidance initiative launched

first_imgNedbank and Primestars are joined byPPC Cement, Gauteng City RegionAcademy, Quest, the South AfricanInstitute of Chartered Accountants,the National Youth DevelopmentAgency and the JD Group assponsors of the programme. Martin Sweet says the project is aimedat inspiring youngsters to play a key rolein overcoming the current projected skillsshortage and the high rate ofunemployment in South Africa.(Images: Ray Maota) MEDIA CONTACTS • Nkosinathi MsizaSenior Communications ManagerNedbank+27 11 295 3560RELATED ARTICLES• Nedbank invests in water project• Nedbank branch runs on wind power• Pens for needy children • Education goes mobile with Vodacom• Can drive raises R8.5m for educationRay MaotaNedbank, one of South Africa’s big four banks, has launched a career guidance initiative for underprivileged high school students that will benefit more than 40 000 pupils in grades 9 to 12 across the country.The launch took place at the Michelangelo Towers hotel on Nelson Mandela Square in Sandton on 15 February 2012, emceed by popular 5FM radio and television presenters, Anele Mdoda and Gareth Cliff.Early career guidanceIn the third year of this initiative, the bank will invest more than R5-million in its My Future My Career programme. It will promote more than 100 career choices across 14 industries and will enable the pupils to discover the academic as well as personality requirements of each career.The students will gain insight into these careers through movie episodes shown at Ster-Kinekor theatres around the country. They will also learn from professionals in the working world what to expect in these careers.Kone Gugushe, Nedbank’s divisional executive for corporate social responsibility, said: “Time and again we see too many students showing up at universities without a clue of what they want to and, more importantly, can study,” Gugushe said.He added that the programme will give students insight into careers and improve the prospects of developing skills in critical sectors such as financial services, health and engineering.The programme, which is endorsed by the Department of Basic Education, was conceptualised by Primestars Marketing, which is also the project manager.Martin Sweet, managing director of Primestars Marketing, said that the project hopes to inspire youngsters to play a key role in overcoming the current projected skills shortage and the high rate of unemployment in South Africa.Through the programme, young people will also be encouraged to explore and take full advantage of the career opportunities.Nedbank and Primestars are joined by PPC Cement, Gauteng City Region Academy, Quest, the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants, the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) and the JD Group as sponsors of the programme.Where to catch the screeningsScreenings will include the following careers: accounting, law, entrepreneurship, mining and engineering, education, health, IT, construction, travel and tourism. Each pupil who attends a screening will leave with a reference booklet on that particular career.The screenings start on 26 February, with the subjects of entrepreneurship and tourism; on 4 March, it is the turn of IT and communications; on 11 March, mining, engineering and construction; on 18 March, banking, finance and accounting; on 15 April, criminal justice and law; on 22 April, health services and education; and on 29 April, arts and culture, and transport, logistics and distribution.They will take place at various theatres countrywide – in Gauteng at Brooklyn in Pretoria; at Eastgate; Sandton; Maponya Mall; Southgate; Eastrand Mall and Westgate in Johannesburg; in Northern Cape at North Cape Mall in Kimberley; in Free State at Mimosa Mall in Bloemfontein; in North West at Rustenburg; in Limpopo at Savannah Mall in Polokwane; and in Kwazulu-Natal at Gateway and Musgrave in Durban.In Western Cape pupils can catch the screenings at Cape Gate and Cavendish in Cape Town; while in the Eastern Cape, they will be at The Bridge in Port Elizabeth and Vincent Park in East London.“The JD Group realises the challenges and the effects of unemployment in South Africa, particularly among the youth of the country. It is with this mind that we partnered with the My Future, My Career initiative,” said Richard Chauke, a director at JD Group.These career episodes will also be screened at 13 NYDA youth centres across the country.The Nedbank FoundationThe Nedbank Foundation is the primary corporate social investment arm of Nedbank.Early this year it launched its Back to School campaign at Ga-Masemola village in Limpopo, where 150 pupils from four schools in the area received essential school items such as uniforms, shoes, stationery, books, bags and sports kits, to start their school year on a high note.It also has other projects that benefit underprivileged students, such as the Nedbank Fundisa Maths and Science Project, under which maths and science teachers in Eastern Cape and Limpopo are enrolled at Unisa for a one-year course on improving their classroom teaching techniques.The foundation also runs the Nedbank Mobile Library Project, the Matric Exam Revision Programme, and the M2 Mathematics Project.last_img read more

2017 Wheat Harvest Cab Cam – John Deere S700 Series Combine

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest For the first wheat harvest Cab Cam of 2017, brought to you by Fennig Equipment, the Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins got a rare glimpse of a brand new John Deere S700 Series combine in action in West Jefferson, Ohio. These machines will be available to farmers beginning next season, but you can get a sneak peek in this video with Jonathan Francis from JD Equipment.last_img

Net-Zero Homes, Part 2: How to Get to Zero

first_imgRELATED ARTICLES GAL-PVcostsheet.xls KTA-GAL-PVcostsheet.xlsx Net-Zero Energy versus Passivhaus Do Grid-Tied Photovoltaic Systems Really Have an Advantage?Testing… Testing… Homes as Net-Zero LaboratoriesNet-Zero Modular Homes Head for Peaks Island, MainePinpointing Leaks With a Fog MachineThinking About Net Zero Energy Phil and I would love to hear from you. If you have a great idea for an upcoming topic, want to leave general feedback, or want to share your favorite cocktail recipe, you can e-mail us at GALounge@greenbuildingadvisor.com. If you’d like to complain about our tangential ramblings, fragment sentences, or our general irreverence, you can email us at Complaints@StraightToTheTrashBin.com. In part two of this episode, the Net Zero conversation gets real as Phil and I talk about how to think about the balancing act of increasing your building performance, decreasing your energy demand, decreasing your mechanical costs, and optimizing your cost. Of course you have to have the target of net zero in mind and the whole team has to be on board. We’ve even included a handy spreadsheet that Phil’s office uses to help run the options and find that “sweet spot.” PODCAST: Net-Zero Homes, Part 1PODCAST: Net-Zero Homes, Part 3PODCAST: Passivhaus, Part 1center_img Remember to check back in later for Part 3, where we really get into the details of making net zero cost-effective. We’ll also share some ideas, and Phil shares a great song from the new Bright Eyes album. And of course part one tells you how to make our cocktail of the episode.Cheers!TRANSCRIPTThis is Part Two of the net zero series, and we’re going to focus on how to get to zero. We’ve talked about what it is and who’s doing it. We’ve talked about our cocktail, the Irish-American. It has been refreshed and we’re ready to move on.Chris: Phil, how do we get there? If a client walks in and says, “Hey, I’ve heard about net zero, and I want to be net zero” — what would be your next sentence?Phil: Right on! Whether you asked me or not, we were headed that way anyway. And it is simple. We know how to do it, but it’s about commitment. We’re doing the things we already know how to do and what you and I have been talking about forever. It’s less about the electrical loads and lighting, and more about reducing our energy demand as much as possibleChris: Yeah, we’re usually on the big three: air sealing, windows and doors, and insulation. It’s all about buttoning up and reducing your demand. I always like to throw in working with the sun.Phil: That’s part of it. Here we’re dealing a little bit more with human behavior, but we’re also dealing with our electrical load. Net zero is simple, but a lot of it is up to the person. The best clients are the excited, educated ones — excited about doing something green — and we’re getting more of those.Chris: Everyone is moving in that direction regardless of whether they want to or not. The goal is to reduce the energy demand as much as possible, and make up the difference with renewables. It’s really that simple. Jamie and I were doing a presentation and he pulled out a great spreadsheet — I have a similar spreadsheet — where you’re playing the “what if” scenario. The envelope is this, and the demand is this; therefore your mechanical system is this. You can almost chart where you start to go overboard with insulation, and you can chart where you can find that sweet spot.Phil: It’s all about the sweet spot. We can find it in a net-zero optimization spreadsheet. The goal is to make it and put it in a PHPP spreadsheet and make it another tab. All it is, is an Excel spreadsheet.Chris: It maximizes the optimization of your insulation to the reduction of the mechanical system so that the cost for your mechanical system is low and the cost for your insulation and other features is not that high. That’s the sweet spot.Phil: And the n the numbers will show you need $160,000 worth of renewables to get to net zero. Then you’ll bring it up to a R-40 wall and R-60 ceiling, and your renewables will come down to $40,000. Here’s the cool thing. I’ve had this conversation with Martin Holladay — at some point you should just buy more PVs and make it easier on yourself.Chris: Usually that conversation happens when you’re at the Passivhaus level. And you have the Passivhaus versus net zero discussion.Phil: Let’s go through the list. To reduce the energy demand, let’s get airtight. There’s the “big three,” and number one is “airtight.”Chris: That’s a wave of construction quality that is important. People know ACH50 now. If I say “ACH50” in a group of peers, 25% of them know it.Phil: Here’s a cool thing. We’ve only done it with one house, but I see people advocating for it: fog machines. You want to see a builder get on board quick: fill the house with fog, and send him on the outside of his house where he can see where his house is leaking. It’s kind of a commercial trick. The fog machine showed us the usual culprits around the doors that weren’t well sealed yet.Chris: You’re doing the opposite of the blower door. With the blower door you’re depressurizing the house and measuring how quickly it re-pressurizes. You get digital numbers at the door. With a fog machine you’re getting a fog machine on the inside and filling the place with fog, pressurizing the house and seeing where it leaks out. You stand at the outside of the house and you go, “Holy cow.”Phil: Airtightness. Windows and doors. We can say a little more about net zero. We can talk about optimized glazing.Chris: You’re trying to optimize day lighting so you’re minimizing the electrical usage of your lights. With net zero, every watt counts.Phil: We add daylighting to the list. It’s not just optimizing your glazing. It’s also daylighting. It’s kind of different, but it’s a corollary. Moving on to proper insulation.Chris: If you’re doing net zero, you’re at least doing 10/20/40/60 — the recommendations from the Building Science Corporation guys. Real quick: R-20 at the basement walls, R-40 for regular walls, and R-60 for whatever is above, and R-10 for under the slab. It’s not standard, but it’s a good rule of thumb.Phil: We find that people are often curious how we came up with that. When we do our cost-optimization spreadsheets, we generally end up in that area. R-40 keeps popping up — it’s kind of a sweet spot. Control of solar gains is more important to net zero south of us. They worry about overheating; you basically want to stick a big umbrella over the house in the summer.Chris: Clever architects figure out a way to do cool shading, and get rid of it in the winter and bring it back in the summer. Deciduous trees are great. I don’t know if we talked about this in our windows podcast, but you must balance your desire to see out your windows. With your systems you’ve reduced your demand and you’re trying to find the system that is your perfect match.Phil: That’s when we had our conversation about heat-pump COP: coefficient of performance. You have a high COP, then you could do a heat-pump scenario. We keep talking about getting off of fossil fuels. Heat-pumps are a great way to do that. They’re taking the mechanical world by storm. There’s a great article in the latest issue of Fine Homebuilding about how to heat a low-energy home. It’s a Martin article.Chris: Are we at the point when we talk about renewables?Phil: The last thing I want to mention is natural ventilation. We talked about how different it is down South. Maximize comfort and minimize the need for mechanical equipment. AC is important, but if you can catch those prevailing winds, you may not need it as much. Know your site and have rooms that have access to that air. In the South, AC is necessary some of the time, and in the North we have to heat our houses. It’s not within the human comfort zoneChris: Let’s talk real quick about HERS. It is the energy score from the Energy Star system. It’s a home energy rating system, and the closest thing we have to mpg for houses. In our climate zone, zone 6, if you get a HERS Index of 80, congratulations — you get an Energy Star label. You are 20% better than the code-compliant house. If I’ve got a HERS 40, you’re in striking distance of starting to use renewables and getting to net zero, with options of PV or wind. We’ve yet to do a podcast on wind, because residential wind is hard. You’ll likely only qualify for wind if your climate is too windy and brutal to be outside. Wind guys, e-mail me and tell me where I am wrong, and we’ll do a podcast on it.Phil: If you’re going to do renewables, you’re probably doing PV. If you want to get your heat or AC low, start considering solar hot water, biomass, geothermal. Those things all help out, but they’re not really helping your electricity load.Chris: Biomass can be carbon-neutral but not net zero. All right, let’s call this Part Two and we’ll wrap it up. In Part 2 of this episode, we discuss:The client is part of the team. The success of a net-zero home requires commitment from the owner.Know the simple strategy and stick to it: Reduce energy demand and make up the difference with renewables.Seal it up — bring down that ACH50. Phil chats about using a fog machine as a tool.Windows and doors — and daylightingProper insulation — Remember the 10-20-40-60 rule.Control solar gain.Systems — find the one that’s right for the house.Natural ventilation.What’s your HERS, before renewables and after renewables? (After renewables, it should be zero).Renewables make up the difference — likely solar, because residential wind is difficult. RELATED MULTIMEDIA You can also subscribe to the Green Architects’ Lounge on iTunes. That way, you’ll never miss a show—and it’s free.last_img read more

Sourav Ganguly at Youth Summit: “I want to coach Indian team”

first_imgFormer India captain Sourav Ganguly has said on Saturday that he would like to be the coach of the Indian team, if such an opportunity comes his way. “Though it’s not my immediate goal, I will like to coach the national team. It will be a great honour,” Ganguly said on Saturday while addressing the India Today Youth Summit in Delhi. He will, however, like to do things differently from former India coach Greg Chappell because of which he had to lose his captaincy and later his place in the team. “I think the captain is the boss of the team, the coach should remain backstage,” he said.In the session Going For Broke chaired by Headlines Today Executive Editor Rahul Kanwal, Ganguly said his coaching will revolve around five central rules: friendly relations with media, no use of media to sideline a player, being honest with players, work with the players, gaining their confidence and staying at the backstage. On being asked what keeps him going, the Bengal Tiger said that the love for the game inspired him to make several comebacks. “After I was dropped from the team in 2006, even my father thought I would not get any chance. But I had faith in myself. I still get high when I score runs,” he said. He admitted cricket was not his first choice. Like most Bengali teenagers, his first love was football. But injuries forced him to give up football and he turned to the game he would rule when he was in Class IX. “My elder brother played cricket, so I started going out with him to play. That’s how it began,” said Ganguly. He also said that his cricketing journey, filled with so many ups and downs, has moulded his character. It has taught him that winning was not always everything. “Of course people expect you to win every time, and you can’t move ahead if you don’t deliver, but the most important part is the amount of struggle you go through to achieve your goal.” he said, “There are more bad days in sports than good ones. But people remember the good days only.” He said that failures have made him a better person. On being asked how it felt to sit out of the team, Ganguly said that it was like a punch to his face. “When I was out of the team, the newspapers made me feel like everything I had done for Team India was wrong. Then I got picked up after six months and suddenly people said there was none better than me. That’s when I realised winning is not everything,” he said adding that “it’s not important how many times you fall, but how you get up every time”. He advised youngsters not to worry much about winning as that adds pressure.  “If you are honest to you profession, some day you will surely win.” The southpaw also praised the efforts of boxer Mary Kom who despite several hardships and obstacles has brought glory to the country by becoming World Woman Boxing Champion five times in a row. The most successful Indian captain ever, Ganguly attributed his success to his teammates. “A team-mate is as good as his team. I had so many talented players in the team and they delivered. We must remember cricket is a team game.” Among all the captains he played under he singles out Tendulkar as the best. “Everyone, including my father, points to Tendulkar’s captaincy record when I say this, but I really blossomed as a cricketer under Sachin,” he said. Ganguly, who opened in ODIs with Tendulkar, said that he considered the 60-plus partnerships with the master blaster as the most memorable in his career. “After we lost to Australia in the World Cup 2003, there was a huge public reaction against our dismal performance. Our next match was against Zimbabwe and I was very tense. Tendulkar came up to me and said that it was the most crucial game of his life and we must win it. It was a small partnership, but it changed our course in the World Cup and we reached the final,” he said. On being asked if he could do something differently in the 2003 World Cup final, he said, “I wish we could bowl better. Every time I asked Zaheer to bowl a particular delivery, he did the opposite.” He also admitted that his tactic of keeping former Australian captain Steve Waugh waiting for him during the toss was a deliberate one. “It was my way of being at the same level as they were.” He also recounted his encounter with Steve Waugh the very next year at Brisbane where Waugh had asked him, “Could you be on time for the toss this time?” “Only if you stop writing,” replied Ganguly. Clearly in a mood to interact with the youngsters present at the summit, Ganguly was at his wittiest best. “Was hitting sixes against leg spinners your success mantra,” asked one delegate to which Ganguly replied, “It was my way of venting out my frustration after facing the fire from the Pollocks and Bret Lees.” On being asked how he had felt after taking off his shirt at the Lord balcony after India had won the NatWest series against England, he said, “I felt cold as it was very cold in London.” He also said that he might take off his shirt again if Kolkata Knight Riders win the IPL. Ganguly believes that Indian cricketers are not involved in match-fixing. He however refused to agree that it’s not about Pakistani players only. “The bookies know who to approach. They observe the players, their behaviours and how they speak to the press or on TV.” On being asked how he dealt with the match fixing crisis after he took over the reigns of Team India in 2000, he said, “Almost all the players were new. So we made a fresh beginning. We did not talk about it. I did not have to deal with it much.” Ganguly also sees no wrong in politicians managing sports. “If their intentions are right, anyone can manage sports. But it’s better if administration is managed by politicians and the sports aspect by players,” he said. The former India captain believes that the Commonwealth Games in India will pass off successfully. “India has the huge ability of surviving disasters. It’s not okay to blame one person for what is happening. If it fails, all are to be blamed.”advertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

Trent Boult hat-trick leads New Zealand to win over Pakistan in 1st ODI

first_imgTrent Boult became only the third male New Zealand cricketer to claim an ODI hat-trick as New Zealand beat Pakistan by 47 runs in the first ODI at the Sheikh Zayed Stadium in Abu Dhabi on Wednesday.Boult joined Danny Morrison and Shane Bond in the history books of New Zealand as he absolutely shut out the Pakistan top order to inflict their first loss in nine matches.During the Pakistan innings, Shadab Khan had claimed three wickets in four deliveries but Boult topped that with a hat-trick.Pakistan had dominated the first hour of play with Shaheen Afridi and Shadab, both ending up with four wickets, but it was the tail of New Zealand batting that propelled them to a defendable total of 266.Boult first bowled danger man Fakhar Zaman off his pads, before Babar Azam nicked through to slip and Mohammad Hafeez was trapped in-front, with the home side in a funk at 3/8.What better man to interview Trent Boult after play than fellow NZ ODI hat-trick hero – Danny Morrison #PAKvNZ pic.twitter.com/UvQlWh1fnTBLACKCAPS (@BLACKCAPS) November 7, 2018Boult had missed the Twenty20 International series to attend the birth of his first child but it didn’t take long for him to announce his arrival in the ODI series.Shoaib Malik and Imam ul-Haq, who was just four years old when Malik made his debut against West Indies at Sharjah in October 1999, combined to slowly rebuild the Pakistan innings, in similar fashion to Taylor and Latham in the first.advertisementArdent Pakistan fans had to dig a little deeper for optimism when a double strike ended the 63-run fourth-wicket partnership, as Pakistan fell to 73/5. Firstly, Lockie Ferguson dismissed Imam (34 from 36 balls), who mistimed a pull to de Grandhomme, with the catcher then nabbing Malik (30 from 50) the next over, who picked out Williamson at mid-off.Sarfraz Ahmed and Imad Wasim also combined effectively. Sarfraz was his usual busy self and although Imad focused more on resistance in the early part of his knock, successive maximums in the 36th over signalled Pakistan weren’t going down without a fight.The skipper soon reached his half-century as the pair clocked up their century stand, which threatened to give this match the climax it deserved until de Grandhomme (2/40, plus two catches) picked up the vital scalp of Sarfraz (64 from 69 balls) as the match entered the final ten overs. Imad reached fifty before Southee got his man, while Ferguson claimed the wicket of Shaheen as New Zealand got their series off to a promising start.Earlier, after winning the toss and electing to bat, New Zealand’s George Worker and Colin Munro didn’t last long, the former edging tamely to Sarfraz Ahmed off Shaheen Afridi (4/46) before the teenage sensation removed his fellow opener lbw.The early inroads shackled the New Zealand batsmen in the middle overs, but Kane Williamson and Taylor kept the scorecard ticking along before the former picked out short midwicket off a Shadab long hop.Latham, who boasts an exceptional record in Asia, joined Taylor at the crease as the duo set about hitting over half of their team’s total. It wasn’t a demolition job by no means, just accomplished batting, calmly finding the gaps without too much risk. Only 20 of Latham’s 68 runs came from boundaries, but the Kiwis were hitting five runs an over without breaking sweat.With Taylor and Latham in control, Shadab (4/38) then bowled a potentially match-defining over when he trapped Latham and Henry Nicholls in front off successive spinning deliveries. He then got Colin de Grandhomme edged at slip two balls later.Another big wicket followed when Taylor was bowled by Imad the next over, with New Zealand’s mid-to-lower order all but wiped out.Some cagey batting followed from the tail until Ish Sodhi hit 24 providing an unlikely cameo with three welcome sixes off Hasan Ali at the death. Boult also smashed a maximum off the last ball by Junaid Khan as Pakistan conceded 50 runs off the final five overs in an innings full of ebb and flow.Pakistan will look to level the three-match series when the two teams meet in the second ODI on Friday.(With ICC inputs)last_img read more