Focus on ‘impactful’ Smart City projects: Centre

first_imgIn an obvious measure to grab eyeballs, the Housing and Urban Affairs Ministry has asked the State governments to push up implementation of “impactful” projects which will get people talking about the Smart City Mission. The Centre and the State governments together have identified 261 projects worth ₹32,600 crore under this category. Majority of these projects are in the first lot of 20 smart cities announced in January 2016. Projects have been shortlisted without any clear definition of what “impactful” means. “261 impactful projects have been identified in consultation with the States and circulated earlier vide letter dated August 16, 2017. These projects are expected to have visible and transformative impact on the various aspects of the lives of the citizens,” Secretary Durga Shankar Mishra writes in a letter addressed to all Chief Secretaries. All these projects have to be commenced by November 2017. The idea is to complete the projects in time for the next Lok Sabha polls in May 2019. The list of “impactful” projects varies from Museum of Urban History in Bhubaneswar, to Adventure Park in Udaipur, to rejuvenation of water bodies in Coimbatore, to 5 km-long heritage walk in Warangal, to conservation of built heritage in Thanjavur, to redevelopment of world-famous Manikarnika Ghat in Varanasi. PPP projectsMr. Mishra, in his letter, has also urged the States to prioritise 370 projects to be completed at a cost of ₹30,000 crore, which are developed under public-private partnership. The Ministry has sent out this missive after the review of Smart Cities by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on August 30. He directed the Chief Secretaries to review the progress of projects on weekly basis. Since the list of first 20 smart cities came out on January 1, 2016, questions have been raised on the mission. For one, the Smart City is a misnomer, because only small pockets of the city are to be developed. The latest review of Smart City projects reveals that only 79 projects with total budget of ₹ 841 crore have been completed. Another 204 projects, with a budget of ₹ 7963 crore are under implementation. Projects worth ₹1.14 lakh crore are still on the drawing board stage. To accelerate work, the Ministry has now decided to award World Bank and AFD (Agence Francaise De Développement) funds on competitive basis. “The detailed guidelines with competition framework in this regard are under finalisation and would be circulated separately,” Mr. Mishra said in his letter.last_img read more

Theres More To Measuring An Olympic Course Than Just Measuring It

If, like me, you thought measuring a race course — marathon, race walk or otherwise — was as simple as driving a car around the circuit, you would be mocked by Katz and company. Turns out that a car’s odometer is fairly imprecise and that the preferred method of course measurement is much more artisanal. It requires only a calculator, 100-meter steel tape, a bicycle fitted with a GPS, and a device called a Jones Counter, which counts the rotations of the bike’s front axle — almost exactly 11,000 “counts” per kilometer.To calibrate the bike for the official course measurement, Katz used the steel tape to measure out 300 meters on the course, taking into account any possible expansion or contraction of the tape from the day’s temperature (there’s an adjustment coefficient for that). Then Katz rode the bike back and forth from Point A to Point B to see how many counts of the Jones Counter occurred over that 300 meter mark. Voilà! The bike was ready to track the rest of the course.“It’s very simple — I can teach you everything that I know about measuring if you have 15 minutes,” Katz told me. So then what makes him so good? “I’m a little bit more detail-oriented; I’m an official pain in the ass,” he said.It’s not quite as simple as Katz lets on, but it is a simpler method than I expected from the person ultimately responsible for ensuring that any records set in road races at the Olympics are in fact records. “He’s exactly the person whom we need for a high stakes measurement like the Olympics,” said Imre Mátraházi, the technical manager of the competitions department of the International Association of Athletics Federations, the international governing body for track and field.The trickiest part of course measurement, said Katz, is cutting the tangents. These can be corners or other parts of the course where athletes could find a shorter route. “If I was going to race you down the road for a million dollars and the road undulates, how are you going to run?” Katz asked. “You’re going to take the shortest path.”During the official measurement process, Katz biked the course, usually less than a foot away from the curb or barricades, to make sure that an athlete couldn’t physically run anything less than the course he’s measuring. He did it several times, biking every possible route that someone could take on the course to ensure that none is too short. But there’s an extra precaution built in as well, known as the short course prevention factor: All international races must be an extra 0.1 percent long — meaning today’s 50 kilometer course is actually 50.05 km, or an extra 50 meters long. Photograph by Allison McCann David Katz is the official course measurer for the race walk at the Rio Olympics. Allison McCann Katz has had help at this Olympics, as is customary, from a Brazilian husband and wife, members of the organizing committee for the Rio Games. They did the initial measurements before Katz came through with the final verdict. “My measurement came out a little better than their measurement,” Katz said matter-of-factly, but he praised their work too. “They are top-notch measurers.”With just over an hour left in the race walk, everything was going smoothly — no London race walk barricade disasters, at least. The current world record holder — France’s Yohann Diniz — was on pace to break that record (he would eventually fade well off pace). At the 25-km mark, he was almost 2 minutes ahead of Slovakia’s Matej Tóth, who eventually won. No world records were broken, so it’s unlikely that someone will re-measure Katz’s course after the Olympics are over. “I’m scared stiff about making a mistake; I double-check everything,” Katz said. But when I asked him whether he’s ever made one, he can’t remember a time he has. Photograph by Allison McCann We’re on the ground in Rio covering the 2016 Summer Olympics. Check out all our coverage here.RIO DE JANEIRO — It’s 7 a.m. The sun has barely risen, but for the better part of an hour, David Katz has been riding his bike around the course for the men’s 50-kilometer race walk later this morning. “More, more, more!” he shouts in the direction of a crew of guys arranging cones on the course, unhappy with the gaps around the second turn. Authority radiates from his neon orange vest, which reads: ROAD COURSE MEASURER.This is not Katz’s first Olympic course measurement rodeo. Or his second or third. He was the official marathon and race walk course measurer for the 2012 London Olympics (there’s only one official measurer, tasked with ensuring that the length of a road course is measured to spec, but usually several others help) and is back again in that role in Rio. He’s been involved with Olympic course measuring as far back as the 1984 Games in Los Angeles. And he’s been organizing and measuring road course races in New York in his spare time for more than 40 years.He’s a bit of a legend, as far as course measurement nerds go. “He is one of the best in the world,” said Wang Tak Fung of Hong Kong, a 20-year veteran of the course measurement game who came early to the race walk event to watch Katz in action. He seemed very impressed that Katz had lugged his steel measuring tape with him — a necessity only during official measurements (which were done weeks ago) and not for this morning’s slight tweaks and adjustments. The day of the race isn’t for official measuring; it’s for double-checking that the measurement is still accurate even after cones, barricades and water tables have been added to the course.“Not too many people do a measurement like that, but I will do it right before the start of the race,” said Katz, a retired science teacher who lives on Long Island in New York. His attention to detail can be heard in every one of his shouts toward race organizers. He wasn’t pleased with the placement of the cones around the second turn of the race walk — they were creating too sharp an angle — so he rolled out his tape measurer (just a regular one) and adjusted them, ensuring that “no athlete has to compete for one extra centimeter.” read more

Man shot dead in Fox Hill overnight by Bahamas Police

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, November 24, 2017 – Nassau – Late today Police confirm that a man is dead after getting into a gun battle with Police.   The incident unraveled in Fox Hill last night around 10, at an apartment on Abner Street.  Intel led officers to the residence, and as police approached the yard, a man reportedly known to Police pulled a firearm from hidden in his clothing and pointed it at officers.In response and in fear for their lives explained the report, Police shot the suspect and recovered an illegal gun.  At the hospital, the suspect was pronounced dead.  There is now launched an investigation into the shooting.#MagneticMediaNews#manshotdeadinNassau Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #manshotdeadinNassaulast_img read more

Overdrive Takes Top Honors at 60th Annual Neal Awards

first_imgThe Randall-Reilly Publishing Company took top honors at the 60th Annual Jesse H. Neal Awards as its Overdrive, The Voice of the American Trucker, brand received the Grand Neal Award during the ABM ceremony held March 14 in New York City.Overdrive’s entry, “CSA’s Data Trail” beat out 612 other submissions including three other finalists—“Project: Blackbird” from MTG Media Group’s Plate magazine, IEEE Media’s IEEE Spectrum’s “The Age of Plenty” and “Videos by Crain’s New York Business” by Crain Communications’ Crain’s New York Business. “This is the kind of committed, analytical reporting where the line between b2b and public service disappears into great journalism,” said Stats.org editor Trevor Butterworth of the winning entry. Butterworth, who presented the award to close the ceremony, was also head judge of this year’s Neal Awards judging board. The other three nominees for Grand Neal still managed to pick up some hardware during the afternoon ceremony, especially Plate’s editor Chandra Ram who was named the 2014 McAllister Editorial Fellow. MTG Media Group picked up a trio of other awards including Best Profile for a Class A publisher for “Project: Blackbird” for which Ram contributed.Despite not nabbing the Grand Neal, parent companies IEEE Media and Crain Communications both picked up a total seven awards each at this year’s ceremony, dominating most categories.Other special awards were given to Robert Cassidy, editorial director of Building Design+Construction, who was the winner of the 46th Annual G.D. Grain, Jr. Award for distinguished editorial excellence and Michael Fabey, editorial editor of Aviation Week, who received the 2014 Timothy White Award for Editorial Integrity.Both Fabey and Cassidy were visibly moved by their achievements and thanked their family for their support throughout their careers, as well as jabbed a little at the industry heavy hitters who put profit over journalistic accountability.“Part of our job is to help our companies make money, but our role and responsibility is to make a difference,” Fabey told the audience.In honor of the 60th anniversary celebration, the Neal Awards singled out the winningest publication and author in its lengthy history. Marianne Dekker Mattera, managing editor of MedPage Today, was honored for her 18 Neal Awards wins writing in the healthcare field. She previously won the G.D. Crain, Jr. Award in 1997. Also, McGraw Hill Financial’s Architectural Record was given a special award for its record 28 wins, including a 2012 Grand Neal prize.Click here to view a full list of winners and finalists for the 2014 Neal Awards.last_img read more

Flying high

first_imgAakashan is a fusion of Australian and Indian traditional aerial acrobatics arts. The show was developed and directed by Catherine Daniel an Australian physical theater practitioner in collaboration with Indian choreographer Vikram Mohan, Carly Sheppard, an indigenous Australian contemporary and tradition dancer and the Kalakar Trust.Aakashan was presented and performed by young artists who belong to traditional artist families having low- income backgrounds. The show’s daring aerial acrobatics feats performed include the aptly named gazelle split, half angel, mermaid, bow and arrow & sleeping beauty.  All these elements require incredible stamina and endurance to perform. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Speaking on the occasion Sterre Sharma, founder Kalakar Trust said, ‘I am proud that the youngsters in this show showed the strength to succeed in spite of the challenges they have faced every day of their life.’Founded by 1992 by Sharma, The Kalakar Trust has grown to benefit more than 1200 families of mostly puppeteers, dancers, musicians, acrobats, and magicians.  The funding for the Trust comes from the sale of Sharma’s paintings.  The basic aim of the Trust is to keep the traditional art of these communities alive by providing education, health services, drinking water, income generation arts and community management.The Kalakar Trust is an NGO working for the up-liftment of underprivileged artists living in Delhi slums. The major project is in Katputli colony, West Delhi. The basic aim of the trust is to keep the traditional art of these communities alive by providing education, health services, drinking water, income generation arts and community management.last_img read more

Bdesh Mukti Jodhas celebrate Vijay Diwas at Fort William

first_imgBangladeshi ‘Mukti Jodhas’ (freedom fighters), Indian war veterans and serving officers of the Armed Forces on Wednesday commemorated their victory over Pakistani forces during the 1971 Liberation War here.Vijay Diwas celebrations at Eastern Command assume a special significance as Mukti Jodhas and Indian war veterans, who fought shoulder to shoulder, reunite every year to celebrate the momentous occasion in history.Lt Gen Praveen Bakshi, General Officer Commanding-In-Chief (GOC-in-C) of Eastern Command, Air Vice Marshal K P Nair and a large number of serving and retired personnel of the three Services paid homage by laying wreaths at Vijay Smarak (War Memorial) in Fort William.Bangladesh Food Minister Md Qamrul Islam also placed wreath along with other serving and retired officers of the 30-member Bangladeshi delegation who were present on the occasion.last_img read more

Intel Lays Out its Vision for a Fully Connected World

first_img 10 min read This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. August 17, 2016 It was fitting that Intel CEO Brian Krzanich’s Tuesday keynote at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) here began with a wide-ranging music demonstration. First, a pair of DJs went to town on a turntable set built on the Intel Next Unit of Computing (NUC) platform. Then a master percussion demonstrated, with something called an “aerodrum,” how waving a pair of sticks in midair (if at expertly calculated positions), could produce a killer backing beat. Finally, a pianist, armed only with a pair of gloves, manipulated the air around him as if it were a full synthesizer. Then, just before Krzanich began his speech, all four musicians played together to deliver an ear-blasting impromptu (and mostly virtual) concert.Technology irrupting into art may have been the first example of what Krzanich envisions coming down the line, but it was far from the last one. His speech, titled “Inventing the Future: The Power of a Smart and Connected World,” was full of plenty of others, touching on everything from games and movies to drones and robots to industry and smart cities and beyond, and was peppered with pontification about what it all means now, and what it’s likely to mean within just the next few years.”We’re truly inventing a world we can’t experience today,” Krzanich said. He was speaking of that “opening act,” which he said represented a new concept called “Merged Reality,” where “things from the real world can come into the virtual world, and vice versa.”But he wanted to take things even further. He said this revolves around four themes: how Intel will redefine the experience of computing; how visual intelligence is being integrated into the products of the future; how Intel is making the cloud an unprecedented platform for innovation; and how the company is empowering the next generation of innovators.He began by introducing Project Alloy, a completely self-contained VR headset, which uses dual RealSense cameras to track positioning. A colleague put on the headset, which displayed a world the video monitors in the keynote hall depicted as a nuclear-powered sci-fi environment. The front-positioned VR cameras gave the demonstrator in-game “hands” that let him interact with a virtual X-ray machine and see the virtual bones inside his hands. Even more interesting: the introduction of real-world items into the virtual world, such as a dollar bill that he could use to “carve” a piece of gold into a unique shape — merged reality in action.Krzanich then introduced Terry Myerson, a senior VP at Microsoft, to discuss the issue of how software will interact with this world, something Microsoft has been concerned with since the introduction of the HoloLens last year. Myerson said the “Windows Holographic experience” will be available for mainstream Windows 10 PCs next year: a new, advanced form of interaction that extends the Windows desktop into virtual space.The ensuing video demonstration showed how encyclopedia entries could be loaded directly into the HoloLens to give users a first-person view of existing geography and history in the making. Myerson said that the VR experience from the video was capable of running, again, on an Intel NUC — a tiny, not-too-powerful desktop. The first version of the specification is due to be released at WinHack in Shenzhen in December. But Krzanich said there was something even more exciting to wait for: In the second half of 2017, Intel will open source the Alloy hardware and open up the RealSense API to allow anyone to create new “merged reality” experiences.What’s involved in creating and editing a virtual reality world? Of course, Intel was prepared to show us — using a system loaded with one of Intel’s new 10-core Broadwell-E processors, the Core i7-6950X. Developing in first person, Krzanich’s colleague pointed out, removed a lot of the unnecessary guesswork from design. Just how intensive is the real-time rendering? Comparing an Intel Core i7-6700K (which is no slouch of a chip) with the 10-core chip, the 10-core machine finished in just a few seconds what it took the 6700K much longer to accomplish. This “immense productivity gain” would allow content generation to explode, Krzanich said.Not everyone will care that much about VR games — but what about sports? Using an array of cameras situated around a basketball arena, Intel can digitize an entire game and make it viewable from any position, from the free-throw line to below the basket.”You become the director of your experience,” Krzanich said. “Imagine any real-life experience. … The whole industry of filming could change as a result of this technology. This is the magic of mixed and merged reality, and we believe it’s a game-changer for virtual reality.”Intel is outfitting stadiums all over the country with the cameras, but that’s not all the company is doing: TXL Labs is the other advancement. “We’re in the process of putting together a production studio in Los Angeles that will be outfited with the technology that makes this possible,” Krzanich said, so that television shows and movies may bring you into the action as never before.You may not want to use virtual reality for everything you do, Krzanich admitted — you may still want to work in the 2D world. To that end, Krzanich said, the upcoming 7th Generation Core platform will provide the necessary underpinnings. Hardware acceleration for the HEVC 10-bit codec makes it possible to play 4K far more smoothly than had previously been possible. But integrated graphics on the chip have improved as well: Another demonstration showed a Dell 2-in-1 playing quite smoothly with decently attractive details. (What resolution the game was operating at, alas, was not mentioned.)Krzanich came back to RealSense to discuss some of the new innovations in drones. He discussed the Yuneec Tornado H, which is now on sale, and uses RealSense cameras to avoid obstacles. And the new Intel Aero platform gives you the basis you need for building your own drone from scratch. Drones, though, are only one new possible intelligent computing application. Intel Euclid is a completely integrated all-in-one platform (only about the size of a candy bar) that gives you “everything you need to bring senses to any robot.” RealSense, motion sensors, positioning sensors, compute capability and more offer lots of new possibilities.Krzanich followed this up with the next generation of RealSense: the RealSense 400, the smallest RealSense camera yet, just a few inches long and less than a quarter of an inch thick. Compared with the previous generation, it doubles the number of 3D points captured and doubles the operating range of the camera. “It will enable developers to create an amazing set of applications,” Krzanich said.”The world of autonomous driving is what we believe is the next great platform for innovation,” Krzanich said. And at the heart of autonomous driving is the ability of the car to see, interpret and act on everything around it. Elmar Frickenstein, the senior vice president of automated driving at BMW, arrived onstage in a self-driving i3 to discuss what he considers “the ultimate driving machine.” (As soon as Frickenstein got out of the car, it drove itself offstage.)Frickenstein addressed the question of how we’ll move from the current cars of today, which are only lightly connected, to the fully autonomous driving predicted to come in the future.Like so much else today, Krzanich said, autonomous driving relies on the cloud — and that reliance will only grow with time. It’s estimated, he said, that by 2020, the average Internet user will generate about 1.5GB of traffic per day — as compared with the smart hospital, which will generate 3,000GB, the autonomous car (4,000GB per day each), airplanes (40,000GB per day) and the smart factory (1,000,000GB per day). And that’s all data that needs to be processed and analyzed, something that will require powerful, dedicated platforms of the type Intel wants to be at the center of.Krzanich then explained the release of the Knowledge Builder platform, which gives developers easy new ways to create and share scenarios with Curie. He estimated that it would reduce development time from weeks to minutes … It will be broadly available in the first quarter of 2017.Most of what Krzanich had been focusing on during his speech were consumer innovations, but what about industry? To discuss that, GE CEO Jeff Immelt came out to discuss ways that new IT tools can increase productivity. “In the case of GE, we say that every industrial company has to transition to be a digital company,” Immelt said — a company that isn’t able to meet these digital requirements is in danger of not being able to satisfy its customers.Beyond customers are just ordinary citizens and people who don’t want to have to worry or think about technology that will work for them and keep them safe. This bridged the gap into a discussion of smart cities, where such things as smart streetlights could make a big difference.But these are all pre-existing ideas — some of the most interesting and important haven’t even been developed yet. This allowed Krzanich to move into the final portion of his presentation, discussing how Intel technologies are being used to create new products and products we can’t imagine today. The company is facilitating further development, Krzanich said, with Joule, a small-size, low-power platform designed to move seamlessly from prototype to final product. Joule, Krzanich said, is available now.What are examples of some of the other makers empowered by Intel working on? Team Grush, winners of the first season of Intel’s America’s Greatest Makers competition, arrived on stage to discuss the smart “gaming toothbrush” that makes dental care fun for kids. By linking toothbrushing to a fantasy-styled shooting game, where you aim your brush at monsters on your teeth, kids can improve their health and have fun at the same time. Though the demo elicited snickers from the audience, it looked very much like a practical application for solving a real problem.”People think Moore’s Law is dead,” Krzanich said holding up one of the Grush toothbrushes, to laughter from the cloud. But you sensed that he was, to some degree, serious. If the number of transistors that can be packed onto a chip no longer matters as it once did, there are still major developments being made and impressive innovation happening all around us.Krzanich was definitely cognizant of this, and acknowledged as much in wrapping up the keynote. “Everything you’ve seen,” he said, “is truly just the beginning of what will soon be possible. I have no doubt that, together, we can change the world.” Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now This story originally appeared on PCMag Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more