English Premier League Standings

first_imgEnglish Premier League StandingsPOS LP CLUB P W D L GF GA GD PTS1 Leicester City 17 11 5 1 37 24 13 382 Arsenal 16 10 3 3 29 13 16 333 Manchester City 16 10 2 4 32 17 15 324 Tottenham Hotspur 17 7 8 2 28 14 14 295 Manchester United 17 8 5 4 22 14 8 296 Crystal Palace 17 9 2 6 23 16 7 297 Watford 17 8 4 5 21 16 5 288 West Ham United 17 6 7 4 25 21 4 259 Liverpool 17 6 6 5 20 22 -2 2410 Everton 17 5 8 4 31 24 7 2311 Stoke City 17 6 5 6 14 16 -2 2312 Southampton 17 5 6 6 21 21 0 2113 West Bromwich Albion 17 5 5 7 17 23 -6 2014 Bournemouth 17 5 4 8 22 32 -10 1915 Chelsea 17 5 3 9 21 27 -6 1816 Norwich City 17 4 5 8 20 29 -9 1717 Newcastle United 17 4 5 8 19 32 -13 1718 Swansea City 17 3 6 8 15 24 -9 1519 Sunderland 17 3 3 11 18 33 -15 1220 Aston Villa 17 1 4 12 14 31 -17 7last_img

Lamarckism Still Shuffles Around

first_imgExamine the following quotation and see if it sounds like what Darwin or Lamarck would say: Somewhere in the murky past, between four and seven million years ago, a hungry common ancestor of today’s primates, including humans, did something novel.  While temporarily standing on its rear feet to reach a piece of fruit, this protohominid spotted another juicy morsel in a nearby shrub and began shuffling toward it instead of dropping on all fours, crawling to the shrub and standing again.    A number of reasons have been proposed for the development of bipedal behavior, or walking on two feet, and now researchers from the University of Washington and Johns Hopkins University have developed a mathematical model that suggests shuffling emerged as a precursor to walking as a way of saving metabolic energy.This is how Science Daily began a story about the evolution of human upright posture.  No attempt was made to tie the behavior to random mutations or to explain how natural selection acted on them.  It sounds like Lamarck’s old hypothesis of the inheritance of acquired characteristics through use and disuse – a discredited idea according to most contemporary Darwinists.  Nor was an explanation offered, if the new stance was so effective, why modern apes still stoop around most of the time on all fours.    Lest Science Daily be accused of misunderstanding evolutionary theory, quotations in the article tie the Lamarckism to the researchers themselves.  Patrick Kramer, an anthropologist at University of Washington, said, “There is nothing that will get you to do something you don’t want to do other than food.  That’s why we bribe animals with food to train them.”  Yet after centuries of bribing animals with food to stand upright, no elephant, horse or ape has acquired upright stance by either Lamarck’s or Darwin’s mechanism.    The researchers studied metabolic efficiency of standing, knuckle-walking and shuffling, but such measurements are about living animals.  They have no necessary connection to the evolutionary theory that made Darwin famous: natural selection acting on random variations.If a creationist were to make this kind of blunder, or tell this kind of just-so story, he or she would be condemned as an ignoramus.  Yet evolutionists get away with violating their own theoretical principles time and again and are only rarely called on the carpet for it (05/31/2004).  Why?  Because in support of their worldview (naturalism), facts don’t matter (see Fairfax’s Law in the Baloney Detector).  All’s fair in love for Darwin and war against creationism.  That’s why Darwin himself slipped back toward Lamarckism in his later years when stubborn facts hampered his ability to market natural selection.    A political cartoon by Mike Shelton illustrates unequal standards.  It applies just as well if relabeled with a Darwinist donkey and a creationist elephant.  Evolutionists will scream and preach about honesty when criticizing a creationist position, but then will lie shamelessly in their own work and call it science.  They will even lie while calling their critics liars, and hypocritically call creationists hypocrites (see Evolution News).    You can almost hear in advance the charges that would come from the pro-Darwin blogs about our pointing out this little inconsistency in their latest just-so story.  Let a creationist be caught in some inconsistency, and the sparks would fly: You creationists are such hypocrites; you Bible-thumping fundamentalists with your narrow religious agenda show that you just don’t understand science.  Let an evolutionist be caught in an inconsistency, and the response will be either (1) ignoring the criticism, or (2) rationalization, like Well, you know what I meant, and we all know that a foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds. (Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Citigroup, CDC launch Africa Fund

first_img17 January 2007US banking giant Citigroup and UK government-backed CDC Group have together committed US$200-million to Citigroup’s first dedicated African private equity fund, the CVCI Africa Fund.CDC Group will commit an initial $100-million to the fund, with Citigroup Venture Capital International (CVCI) – which will manage the fund – matching CDC’s investments dollar for dollar.“The fund will provide growth capital to larger companies across Africa and will invest alongside CVCI’s managed emerging market private equity funds,” CDC said in a statement on Monday.CDC is a British government-owned fund of funds with assets of £1.6-billion that targets businesses in poorer countries, with an emphasis on Africa and South Asia.According to CDC, its commitment to the CVCI Africa Fund will bring its total investments in Africa to over $830-million since 2004.Investors eye AfricaThe move comes as companies across Africa attract increasing attention from both local and international private equity investors.The African Venture Capital Association said recently that it expected a dramatic increase in the amount of private equity capital invested on the continent since 2004, when deals worth more than $1.3-billion were done.Sunil Nair, CVCI’s MD for Central and Eastern Europe, Middle East and Africa, said the new fund would “seek to capitalise on the growth of African economies, evidenced by high GDP growth.“The investment environment is increasingly attractive given rising political and macroeconomic stability, growing disposable income and economic reform which will particularly benefit sectors such as mining, oil and gas, financial services, infrastructure, transportation and consumer goods,” Nair said in the CDC statement.“We believe that Africa is a high potential market where we can generate attractive returns,” said CVCI head Dipak Rastogi.Individual amounts of between $20-million and $60-million would be invested in companies in both sub-Saharan and North Africa, CDC said.CDC chief executive Richard Laing said investment areas would include infrastructure, natural resources, energy, telecommunications and general manufacturing.Private equity activity in SAThe boom in private equity activity worldwide has been mirrored lately in South Africa, where a number of large corporations – among them Shoprite, Edcon, Alexander Forbes, Consol Glass and Primedia – have attracted bids from private equity players.And according to Business Report, the governments of Ghana, Nigeria and South Africa have intervened to help develop the private equity asset class.“The South African government has established the National Empowerment Fund, which is targeting the black SME sector with investments from R100 000 to R50-million,” Business Report noted.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Delta’s new flight museum

first_imgMuseums, the best of them, tell a story. And the story the new Delta Flight Museum tells is dramatic. Tracing the history of one airline, the 68,000 square-foot facility, located on the northern reaches of Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport, manages to illuminate – in meticulous detail – the history of the airline industry as a whole. It does that by looking at Delta’s legacy, the constituent carriers that coalesced to form a global powerhouse. Northwest, Northeast, Western and Pan Am are all represented, as are other smaller airlines.The non-profit museum (there’s an admission fee) unfolds the saga via interactive information kiosks and assorted airline artifacts, the most compelling of which is a squadron of actual airliners. Out front Delta’s parked a 757-200, and a DC-9-50, both painted in the carrier’s classic “widget” livery. But it’s inside hangars One and Two respectively that the real show plays out.Enter the museum and take an immediate right turn. The first thing that catches your eye is an immaculately restored DC-3 proplliner – Ship 41, tail number NC2834. Take a while to drink in the classic design of the airplane. It’s polished bare-metal reflects the rays of sunlight that filter in the expansive hangar bay.Up ahead is a five-passenger, 90 mph Travel Air – the craft that launched Delta’s first passenger service between Dallas and Jackson, Mississippi. The Propeller Age artifacts arrayed in Hangar One include a toy Western Air Express bi-plane for the kids to play in. This AirlineRatings’ author’s grandchildren were fascinated by it. It was a tough to pry them away. They oohed and aahed and giggled and I explained to them how airplanes fly.Over along the far wall of Hangar One is a visual playground for adult aviation enthusiasts: early airline schedules from the carriers with which Delta merged, route maps that etch the carrier’s first east/west routes across the American South, cotton balls and chewing gum issued to flyers of an earlier era to muffle the sound of the piston engine and equalize pressure on their ears.Hangar Two houses the star of the show: a Boeing 767-200, The Spirit of Delta. Employees purchased the airplane for the carrier by raising $30 million.Enter the ship and grab a seat in first class. No charge for the upgrade. Peak inside the cockpit or head to the tail, along the way taking in displays of pilot and flight attendant uniforms of the early jet age.Down below, on the ground floor, get a preflight checklist and perform a walk around inspection of the massive seven-six, the way the first officer (co-pilot) does. A pamphlet lays out your beneath-the belly route, explaining each step in layman’s terms. By the time you reach the tail and crane your neck up at the elevators (which make the aircraft ascend and descend) you’ll have a decent idea of the fundamentals of flight.If the star of the show is the 767, the sexiest exhibit is the Boeing 737-200 flight simulator. The museum says it’s the only real full-motion flight “sim” open to the public in the United States. Take a look inside at no extra charge. “Fly” the seven-three for 45 minutes for US$395. You’ll have to call ahead for reservations.While the Delta Flight Museum isn’t far from Delta headquarters, it’s not immediately adjacent to the mid-field terminal complex of the world’s busiest airport. If you’re passing through ATL and want to see it best bet is to grab a cab.Find out more about the museum by going to the Web site at www.deltamuseum.org . Contact them via e-mail at museum.delta@delta.com. The phone number is 1-404-715-7886.The Delta Flight Museum won’t be mistaken for Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. But what it does, it does exceptionally well. If you’ve got a long layover in Atlanta you could spend your precious time in far less fascinating fashion.last_img read more

Volunteers gear up for busy 2010

first_img18 December 2009While many South Africans will be relaxing over the holiday season, the 2010 Fifa World Cup Organising Committee (OC) will still be hard at work preparing for the task at hand next year.For the OC volunteer department, the New Year will bring with it the conclusion of the selection process and the beginning of training for the 15 000-strong group of volunteers that will help make 2010 happen.In January, the selection of the final 15 000 volunteers who will provide support at the 2010 Fifa World Cup™ will begin in earnest. These volunteers will be selected from a shortlist of 37 080 who were pre-selected from a total of 64 500 initial applications received from South Africa and abroad.The OC volunteer department will conduct interviews with the pre-selected applicants in January and February 2010, while for foreign pre-selected applicants, interviews will be conducted at the country of origin and in some instances through video conferencing.The successful volunteers chosen from this interview process will then be taken through extensive training in March and April 2010 in all nine of the host cities of the World Cup, while international volunteers will be trained over the internet, to ensure that once the teams arrive, the stadium gates open and the airports fill up, South Africa will be ready for 2010.For OC chief executive officer Danny Jordaan, the work of the volunteers is vital in ensuring that the tournament goes off without a hitch.“Volunteers form the backbone of the organisation of events the size of the World Cup,” Jordaan said this week. “We owe those who have already volunteered for the Confederations Cup and the Final Draw a large vote of thanks for all their support – they formed part of the core team which delivered these successful events to the world.“Next year we will once again rely on these selfless people in our efforts to ensure that we host a successful World Cup.“The volunteers that will be selected early next year certainly have their work cut out for them, but I know they will stand up to the challenge,” Jordaan said. This is their moment to be part of history, and we will welcome them into the World Cup team next year when selection is finalised.”The successful applicants will be trained in areas such as accreditation, administration, language support, IT and T, logistics, marketing, media, protocol, transport, volunteer management, and welcome and information services.Source: 2010 Fifa World Cup South Africa Organising Committeelast_img read more

Focus on ‘impactful’ Smart City projects: Centre

first_imgIn an obvious measure to grab eyeballs, the Housing and Urban Affairs Ministry has asked the State governments to push up implementation of “impactful” projects which will get people talking about the Smart City Mission. The Centre and the State governments together have identified 261 projects worth ₹32,600 crore under this category. Majority of these projects are in the first lot of 20 smart cities announced in January 2016. Projects have been shortlisted without any clear definition of what “impactful” means. “261 impactful projects have been identified in consultation with the States and circulated earlier vide letter dated August 16, 2017. These projects are expected to have visible and transformative impact on the various aspects of the lives of the citizens,” Secretary Durga Shankar Mishra writes in a letter addressed to all Chief Secretaries. All these projects have to be commenced by November 2017. The idea is to complete the projects in time for the next Lok Sabha polls in May 2019. The list of “impactful” projects varies from Museum of Urban History in Bhubaneswar, to Adventure Park in Udaipur, to rejuvenation of water bodies in Coimbatore, to 5 km-long heritage walk in Warangal, to conservation of built heritage in Thanjavur, to redevelopment of world-famous Manikarnika Ghat in Varanasi. PPP projectsMr. Mishra, in his letter, has also urged the States to prioritise 370 projects to be completed at a cost of ₹30,000 crore, which are developed under public-private partnership. The Ministry has sent out this missive after the review of Smart Cities by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on August 30. He directed the Chief Secretaries to review the progress of projects on weekly basis. Since the list of first 20 smart cities came out on January 1, 2016, questions have been raised on the mission. For one, the Smart City is a misnomer, because only small pockets of the city are to be developed. The latest review of Smart City projects reveals that only 79 projects with total budget of ₹ 841 crore have been completed. Another 204 projects, with a budget of ₹ 7963 crore are under implementation. Projects worth ₹1.14 lakh crore are still on the drawing board stage. To accelerate work, the Ministry has now decided to award World Bank and AFD (Agence Francaise De Développement) funds on competitive basis. “The detailed guidelines with competition framework in this regard are under finalisation and would be circulated separately,” Mr. Mishra said in his letter.last_img read more

Theres More To Measuring An Olympic Course Than Just Measuring It

If, like me, you thought measuring a race course — marathon, race walk or otherwise — was as simple as driving a car around the circuit, you would be mocked by Katz and company. Turns out that a car’s odometer is fairly imprecise and that the preferred method of course measurement is much more artisanal. It requires only a calculator, 100-meter steel tape, a bicycle fitted with a GPS, and a device called a Jones Counter, which counts the rotations of the bike’s front axle — almost exactly 11,000 “counts” per kilometer.To calibrate the bike for the official course measurement, Katz used the steel tape to measure out 300 meters on the course, taking into account any possible expansion or contraction of the tape from the day’s temperature (there’s an adjustment coefficient for that). Then Katz rode the bike back and forth from Point A to Point B to see how many counts of the Jones Counter occurred over that 300 meter mark. Voilà! The bike was ready to track the rest of the course.“It’s very simple — I can teach you everything that I know about measuring if you have 15 minutes,” Katz told me. So then what makes him so good? “I’m a little bit more detail-oriented; I’m an official pain in the ass,” he said.It’s not quite as simple as Katz lets on, but it is a simpler method than I expected from the person ultimately responsible for ensuring that any records set in road races at the Olympics are in fact records. “He’s exactly the person whom we need for a high stakes measurement like the Olympics,” said Imre Mátraházi, the technical manager of the competitions department of the International Association of Athletics Federations, the international governing body for track and field.The trickiest part of course measurement, said Katz, is cutting the tangents. These can be corners or other parts of the course where athletes could find a shorter route. “If I was going to race you down the road for a million dollars and the road undulates, how are you going to run?” Katz asked. “You’re going to take the shortest path.”During the official measurement process, Katz biked the course, usually less than a foot away from the curb or barricades, to make sure that an athlete couldn’t physically run anything less than the course he’s measuring. He did it several times, biking every possible route that someone could take on the course to ensure that none is too short. But there’s an extra precaution built in as well, known as the short course prevention factor: All international races must be an extra 0.1 percent long — meaning today’s 50 kilometer course is actually 50.05 km, or an extra 50 meters long. Photograph by Allison McCann David Katz is the official course measurer for the race walk at the Rio Olympics. Allison McCann Katz has had help at this Olympics, as is customary, from a Brazilian husband and wife, members of the organizing committee for the Rio Games. They did the initial measurements before Katz came through with the final verdict. “My measurement came out a little better than their measurement,” Katz said matter-of-factly, but he praised their work too. “They are top-notch measurers.”With just over an hour left in the race walk, everything was going smoothly — no London race walk barricade disasters, at least. The current world record holder — France’s Yohann Diniz — was on pace to break that record (he would eventually fade well off pace). At the 25-km mark, he was almost 2 minutes ahead of Slovakia’s Matej Tóth, who eventually won. No world records were broken, so it’s unlikely that someone will re-measure Katz’s course after the Olympics are over. “I’m scared stiff about making a mistake; I double-check everything,” Katz said. But when I asked him whether he’s ever made one, he can’t remember a time he has. Photograph by Allison McCann We’re on the ground in Rio covering the 2016 Summer Olympics. Check out all our coverage here.RIO DE JANEIRO — It’s 7 a.m. The sun has barely risen, but for the better part of an hour, David Katz has been riding his bike around the course for the men’s 50-kilometer race walk later this morning. “More, more, more!” he shouts in the direction of a crew of guys arranging cones on the course, unhappy with the gaps around the second turn. Authority radiates from his neon orange vest, which reads: ROAD COURSE MEASURER.This is not Katz’s first Olympic course measurement rodeo. Or his second or third. He was the official marathon and race walk course measurer for the 2012 London Olympics (there’s only one official measurer, tasked with ensuring that the length of a road course is measured to spec, but usually several others help) and is back again in that role in Rio. He’s been involved with Olympic course measuring as far back as the 1984 Games in Los Angeles. And he’s been organizing and measuring road course races in New York in his spare time for more than 40 years.He’s a bit of a legend, as far as course measurement nerds go. “He is one of the best in the world,” said Wang Tak Fung of Hong Kong, a 20-year veteran of the course measurement game who came early to the race walk event to watch Katz in action. He seemed very impressed that Katz had lugged his steel measuring tape with him — a necessity only during official measurements (which were done weeks ago) and not for this morning’s slight tweaks and adjustments. The day of the race isn’t for official measuring; it’s for double-checking that the measurement is still accurate even after cones, barricades and water tables have been added to the course.“Not too many people do a measurement like that, but I will do it right before the start of the race,” said Katz, a retired science teacher who lives on Long Island in New York. His attention to detail can be heard in every one of his shouts toward race organizers. He wasn’t pleased with the placement of the cones around the second turn of the race walk — they were creating too sharp an angle — so he rolled out his tape measurer (just a regular one) and adjusted them, ensuring that “no athlete has to compete for one extra centimeter.” read more

Man shot dead in Fox Hill overnight by Bahamas Police

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, November 24, 2017 – Nassau – Late today Police confirm that a man is dead after getting into a gun battle with Police.   The incident unraveled in Fox Hill last night around 10, at an apartment on Abner Street.  Intel led officers to the residence, and as police approached the yard, a man reportedly known to Police pulled a firearm from hidden in his clothing and pointed it at officers.In response and in fear for their lives explained the report, Police shot the suspect and recovered an illegal gun.  At the hospital, the suspect was pronounced dead.  There is now launched an investigation into the shooting.#MagneticMediaNews#manshotdeadinNassau Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #manshotdeadinNassaulast_img read more

Overdrive Takes Top Honors at 60th Annual Neal Awards

first_imgThe Randall-Reilly Publishing Company took top honors at the 60th Annual Jesse H. Neal Awards as its Overdrive, The Voice of the American Trucker, brand received the Grand Neal Award during the ABM ceremony held March 14 in New York City.Overdrive’s entry, “CSA’s Data Trail” beat out 612 other submissions including three other finalists—“Project: Blackbird” from MTG Media Group’s Plate magazine, IEEE Media’s IEEE Spectrum’s “The Age of Plenty” and “Videos by Crain’s New York Business” by Crain Communications’ Crain’s New York Business. “This is the kind of committed, analytical reporting where the line between b2b and public service disappears into great journalism,” said Stats.org editor Trevor Butterworth of the winning entry. Butterworth, who presented the award to close the ceremony, was also head judge of this year’s Neal Awards judging board. The other three nominees for Grand Neal still managed to pick up some hardware during the afternoon ceremony, especially Plate’s editor Chandra Ram who was named the 2014 McAllister Editorial Fellow. MTG Media Group picked up a trio of other awards including Best Profile for a Class A publisher for “Project: Blackbird” for which Ram contributed.Despite not nabbing the Grand Neal, parent companies IEEE Media and Crain Communications both picked up a total seven awards each at this year’s ceremony, dominating most categories.Other special awards were given to Robert Cassidy, editorial director of Building Design+Construction, who was the winner of the 46th Annual G.D. Grain, Jr. Award for distinguished editorial excellence and Michael Fabey, editorial editor of Aviation Week, who received the 2014 Timothy White Award for Editorial Integrity.Both Fabey and Cassidy were visibly moved by their achievements and thanked their family for their support throughout their careers, as well as jabbed a little at the industry heavy hitters who put profit over journalistic accountability.“Part of our job is to help our companies make money, but our role and responsibility is to make a difference,” Fabey told the audience.In honor of the 60th anniversary celebration, the Neal Awards singled out the winningest publication and author in its lengthy history. Marianne Dekker Mattera, managing editor of MedPage Today, was honored for her 18 Neal Awards wins writing in the healthcare field. She previously won the G.D. Crain, Jr. Award in 1997. Also, McGraw Hill Financial’s Architectural Record was given a special award for its record 28 wins, including a 2012 Grand Neal prize.Click here to view a full list of winners and finalists for the 2014 Neal Awards.last_img read more