Read the Writing on the Wall, President Weah!

first_imgThat the George Weah led government is dire straits is open fact. The question is what is this government doing to address the situation given all that is obtaining? From what it appears, rather than devising long term solutions to address the problem, quick fixes are instead being proffered as the solution. But as this newspaper has warned in previous editorials, quick fixes just do not work and this is a lesson which should have been learned from the previous administration which was noted for making policies on the fly.As things currently stand, civil servants are demanding payment of salary arrears else they would stage a go-slow. This is against the backdrop of a planned mass protest set for December 30, 2019. It is being speculated that the GOL has brought in some cash to alleviate the situation. The Daily Observer has sought to no avail confirm reports that Liberian dollar banknotes were printed in Russia and brought into the country recently along with some US dollars believed to have been arranged with help from sources in the US.Whether such will go far enough to assuage angry concerns of civil servants and the public at large remains to be seen. According to Senate President Pro Tempore, Albert Chie, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has promised to provide help not immediately but in February next year. But the caveat to this is the demand placed by the World Bank to have government restitute funds (illegally taken) to the tone of US$11,800, else there will be consequences, which were not specified. But Finance Minister Samuel Tweah is fully aware that failure on the part of any country to meet World Bank benchmarks means the IMF will not provide lending assistance.Thus, It appears unlikely that the IMF will provide the promised assistance in February in the event of failure on the part of this government to the World Bank demands for restitution. In the opinion of the Daily Observer, these are worrying signs which should claim the immediate and urgent attention of this government. However its officials do not appear to be seized of the urgency of the situation. They appear to be more fixed on aborting or taking the wind out of the sails of the December 30 protest that apparently nothing else seems to matter.Already the United States Embassy near Monrovia has announced a placement of restrictions on the issuance of non-immigrant visas but even more dire are reports that the United States Government is pulling out Peace Corps Volunteers from the country. Daily Observer confirmed earlier that the pullout of Peace Corps Volunteers has affected 12 out of Liberia’s 15 counties. From the background of experience, such reports would suggest that such a move is being taken in anticipation of an outbreak of violence in order to mitigate potential risks to the safety of US citizens in Liberia.According to a security expert, the likelihood of violence erupting on December 30 cannot be considered far-fetched because, according to him, government officials at the highest level of government appear to be possessed of a siege mentality. And given that most of the current crop of officials appear to be oblivious of the lessons of recent and contemporary Liberian history, they could encourage the unleashing of violence not being aware of the consequences such would entail.As the countdown to December 30 continues, this newspaper would urge and encourage officials of this government to follow closely developments of the pullout of US Peace Corps Volunteers from Liberia. This newspaper would urge President Weah to place the brakes on hawkish elements in his close company and tread lightly on December 30. He should be mindful that he is about to face a monumental challenge and the longevity of his government may depend on how he responds to these pressing challenges. He should studiously avoid those who encourage him to use the “any bush shake, fire will blaze” approach to the impending crisis.President Weah should read the writing on the wall!Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

ShopX enters into strategic tie-up with Puma

first_imgNew Delhi, Apr 20 (PTI) Digital offline platform ShopX has entered into a strategic tie-up with Puma, which would help the German sportswear firm scale up its footwear business in tier II markets.Puma will leverage ShopXs digital offline model to scale up its footwear business and help it establish presence in over 1,500 retail outlets in tier II markets, ShopX said in a statement.ShopX CEO and Co-Founder Amit Sharma said: “Pumas brand pull, popularity, wide range of products, competitive pricing along with our wide and relevant distribution base should work as catalysts in making this partnership a success.”ShopX, in which former UIDAI chairman and Infosys co-founder Nandan Nilekani is a strategic investor, has built logistics efficiency through its “LMDN” last mile delivery network.”This will result in highly ROI driven retailer outreach for Puma. On the other hand, Direct brand partnerships through ShopXs platform will help retailers get access to the entire range of Pumas sports footwear category,” the company said.Within a year of launch, ShopX has empowered 45,000 retail partners across 230 towns in 10 states; serving more than 3 million customers.The company aims to provide the 600-million middle-income population in India access to digital commerce through its retailer partners. PTI KRH JMlast_img read more

British Equestrian Federation could lose £21m funding after bullying is revealed

first_imgShare on Facebook The British Equestrian Federation has been told it risks losing public funding of more than £21m after a damning report found evidence of bullying, elitism and self-interest within the sport.The independent report was commissioned by the national governing body in October following the abrupt resignation of its chief executive, Clare Salmon, in July. She had been appointed in February 2016 to modernise the BEF but, as the report details, her approach ruffled feathers within equestrianism and she was forced out.Salmon thanked the three-strong review panel, which was chaired by John Mehrzad, the lawyer who prepared a similar report for British Cycling last year. Since you’re here… “From day one I was set up to fail by people who were deliberately frustrating the change required,” Salmon said. “I was bullied out by people driven by self-interest and elitism. This is unacceptable for an organisation receiving more than £20m of public money.”The threat to the funding of the sport – one of Britain’s most successful at recent Olympic and Paralympic Games – is made clear at the end of the report.“In so far that the recommendations in this report are not addressed within a reasonable period of time … UK Sport and Sport England would be entitled to suspend public funding,” it said.In response, the two agencies issued a statement saying they welcomed the review and the “full acceptance” of its recommendations by the BEF and its 19 member bodies. “Ongoing funding will be dependent on the BEF and its member bodies acting to implement the recommendations of this review. We will keep this under close review.”The report found that a “climate of fear” and “culture of bullying” exists within British Dressage and British Showjumping, with “broadly similar” allegations made from a smaller number of contributors about British Eventing, the British Horse Society and Endurance GB.The report also highlights the fact the sport is too expensive, is run by small cliques and therefore struggles to retain staff.It is the latest sports governing body to face negative allegations about its culture, after reviews were conducted at British Cycling, Canoeing, British Swimming and British Bobsleigh. Share on WhatsApp Share on Pinterest Support The Guardian Read more British Equestrian Federation launches investigation into bullying claims Sport politics Topics Share on Twitter … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. news Reuse this content Share on Messenger Share on LinkedIn Share via Email Equestrianismlast_img read more