Timehri woman’s family remains fearful as suspect yet to be arrested

first_imgDomestic violenceRanks attached to the Timehri Police Station, East Bank Demerara (EBD) are coming in for harsh criticism for their non-action to effect the arrest of a Timehri man, who attacked and severely beat the mother of his child on April 25, 2019 causing the woman to lose several teeth and sustain other injuries.Nirmala SookwahNirmala Sookwah, 20, was beaten by the father of her child after she refused to continue the relationship with him after suffering domestic violence.“If the Police had told us that they can’t find him, we would’ve accepted that, because at least we would know that they were trying, but up to yesterday (Saturday) I saw this bai, he ain’t hiding, so the Police can easily find him, but they are not trying,” Naresh Sookwah, the woman’s father, told Guyana Times.As such, the man is pleading with the authorities to protect his daughter from the suspect.“The gyal afraid, she can’t live in peace because he deh out here and we ain’t know when he can try something again, because nobody ain’t doing anything to him. We really need to see him arrested; she have a small son to live for,” the elder Sookwah added.As a result of the beating at the hands of the suspect, Sookwah lost several teeth, sustained a broken jaw and nose, and suffered injuries to her left knee.On the night of the incident, Sookwah had already retired to bed in her Lot 131 Hyde Park, Timehri home, when there was a knock on her door followed by the suspect calling out her name.Scared for her life, Sookwah recounted that she did not respond to the calls which caused the suspect to leave. He, however, returned later, broke a window, and gained access to the house.The woman said that she ran out of the house, but was caught by the man and thrown down a hill in the area.She was then further attacked and beaten. A relative went to her aid and the suspect fled the scene.Sookwah’s father had earlier related to this newspaper that his daughter was in an abusive relationship with her attacker, but separated from him two months ago.Sookwah left the relationship after she was severely beaten after questioning her then lover about a sum of money which belonged to her that he allegedly used to purchase a motorcycle. Following the beating and her departure from the home, the suspect has been following her and begging her to resume the relationship.When contacted, Divisional Commander Marlon Chapman assured that stringent efforts were still being made to apprehend the suspect.last_img read more

Rivet graphene proves its mettle

first_imghttp://news.rice.edu/files/2016/07/0718_RIVET-2-WEB-1dqdf5v.jpgA sheet of rivet graphene (outlined in yellow) floats in water. The enhanced graphene created at Rice University can be transferred from its growth substrate without the need for contaminating polymers. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2016/07/0718_RIVET-3-WEB-19lik8l.jpgRivet graphene (outlined in yellow) is nearly as transparent as pure graphene and retains its strength and conductivity even when flexed. The material was created at Rice University. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) Share4Editor’s note: Links to high-resolution images for download appear at the end of this release. David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.edu‘Rivet graphene’ proves its mettleRice University shows toughened material is easier to handle, useful for electronics HOUSTON – (July 14, 2016) – Nanoscale “rivets” give graphene qualities that may speed the wonder material’s adoption in products like flexible, transparent electronics, according to researchers at Rice University.The Rice lab of chemist James Tour reported the creation of “rivet graphene,” two-dimensional carbon that incorporates carbon nanotubes for strength and carbon spheres that encase iron nanoparticles, which enhance both the material’s portability and its electronic properties.The material is the subject of a paper in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano.Until now, researchers have had to transfer graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition with a polymer layer to keep it from wrinkling or ripping. But the polymer tended to leave contaminants behind and degrade graphene’s abilities to carry a current.“Rivet graphene proved tough enough to eliminate the intermediate polymer step,” Tour said. “Also, the rivets make interfacing with electrodes far better compared with normal graphene’s interface, since the junctions are more electrically efficient.“Finally, the nanotubes give the graphene an overall higher conductivity. So if you want to use graphene in electronic devices, this is an all-around superior material,” he said.Tests proved rivet graphene retained the strength of the Tour lab’s rebar graphene (which incorporates nanotube reinforcement) as well as rebar’s ability to float on water. But the rivets also enhanced the material’s ability to transfer current between electrodes and the graphene, even when bent, the researchers reported.The rivets are layers of carbon wrapped around a 30-nanometer iron core, dubbed “nano-onions” by the lab. The structures are grown in place in the CVD furnace after the dispersal of nanotubes and deposition of graphene. A final step welds all the elements together, Tour said.Rivet graphene is transparent enough for flexible and transparent electronics, he said, and the simplified process should be scalable.Xinlu Li, a former visiting researcher at Rice and a professor at Chongqing University, China, is lead author of the paper. Co-authors are graduate student Junwei Sha of Rice, Tianjin University, China, and the Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering in Tianjin; graduate student Yilun Li, postdoctoral researcher Yongsung Ji and former postdoctoral researcher Seoung-Ki Lee of Rice; and Yujie Zhao of Chongqing. Tour is the T.T. and W.F. Chao Professor of Chemistry as well as a professor of computer science and of materials science and nanoengineering.The research was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and its Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative, the Natural Science Foundation Project of China’s Chongqing Science and Technology Commission and the China Scholarship Council.-30-Read the abstract at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsnano.6b03080Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsRelated materials:Tour Group: www.jmtour.comWiess School of Natural Sciences: http://natsci.rice.eduImages for download: http://news.rice.edu/files/2016/07/0718_RIVET-1-WEB-1fjessg.jpgIron nanoparticles wrapped in carbon and embedded in graphene enhance the material’s connection to an electrode, according to scientists at Rice University. Rivet graphene adds the nanoparticles and carbon nanotube reinforcement to give graphene greater strength, portability and enhanced electronic properties. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2016/07/0718_RIVET-5-WEB-15zwkn2.jpgA single “rivet,” a carbon-wrapped nanoparticle of iron, attached to graphene that has been reinforced by an interconnected web of carbon nanotubes, which are also visible in this transmission electron microscope image. The material created at Rice University displays strength, flexibility and superior connectivity with electrodes. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,910 undergraduates and 2,809 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for best quality of life and for lots of race/class interaction by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. http://news.rice.edu/files/2016/07/0718_RIVET-4-WEB-zkptx1.jpgCarbon-wrapped iron “rivets” dot the surface of graphene. The material created at Rice University is strong and flexible and does not require an intermediate for transfer from its growth substrate. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) AddThislast_img read more