Global investment in wind and solar doubles that in gas, nuclear, and coal

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Wall Street Journal:Global spending on renewable energy is outpacing investment in electricity from coal, natural gas and nuclear power plants, driven by falling costs of producing wind and solar power.More than half of the power-generating capacity added around the world in recent years has been in renewable sources such as wind and solar, according to the International Energy Agency.In 2016, the latest year for which data is available, about $297 billion was spent on renewables—more than twice the $143 billion spent on new nuclear, coal, gas and fuel oil power plants, according to the IEA. The Paris-based organization projects renewables will make up 56% of net generating capacity added through 2025.Once supported overwhelmingly by cash-back incentives, tax credits and other government incentives, wind- and solar-generation costs have fallen consistently for a decade, making renewable-power investment more competitive.Renewable costs have fallen so far in the past few years that “wind and solar now represent the lowest-cost option for generating electricity,” said Francis O’Sullivan, research director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Energy Initiative.Sustained government support in Europe and other developed economies spurred the development of renewable energy. But costs have fallen for other reasons. China invested heavily in a domestic solar-manufacturing industry, creating a glut of inexpensive solar panels. Innovation helped manufacturers build longer wind-turbine blades, creating machines able to generate substantially more power at a lower cost.Renewable-energy plants also face fewer challenges than traditional power plants. Nuclear-power plants have been troubled by mostly technical delays, while plants burning fossil fuels face regulatory uncertainties due to concerns about climate change. And pension funds, seeking long-term stable returns, have invested heavily in wind farms and solar parks, allowing developers to get cheaper financing.“It is just easier to get renewables built,” said Tony Clark, a former member of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. “There is that much less opposition to it.”More ($): Global Investment in Wind and Solar Energy Is Outshining Fossil Fuels Global investment in wind and solar doubles that in gas, nuclear, and coallast_img read more

Is your data incomplete, outdated or just plain wrong?

first_imgSeveral years ago, there were reports about how Target uses predictive analytics to identify customers who are pregnant and then markets to them accordingly. A New York Times article included the story of a father who was upset that his teenage daughter received coupons for baby clothes and cribs … until his daughter confirmed that she was expecting.Therefore, I was not taken by surprise when, soon after reading about it, I received an email from Target congratulating me on my new baby. Except I wasn’t pregnant. I still sometimes wonder which combination of purchases it was that put me in the wrong bucket. I laughed it off and told the story a few times. But I can easily imagine how upsetting that message could have been be for a different woman in a different situation.That is an extreme example of just how bad inaccurate data can be. But bad data isn’t always wrong data. As our cover story explains, bad data is also incomplete or outdated information about your members.“Bad data happens more often than we think,” says Karan Bhalla, CEO of CUES Supplier member CU Rise Analytics, Vienna, Virginia. “Everybody is having a lot more information thrown at them every day. Managing all that data requires a big culture shift and new expertise.” ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

English FA to players: Deliberately cough at players, referees, get sent off

first_imgRelatedPosts COVID-19: NCAA to revoke erring airlines licence over non-compliance FRSC to Schools: We’ll arrest, prosecute drivers who flout COVID-19 rules Sanwo-Olu: We’re committed to fulfilling promises to Lagosians Players who deliberately cough at opponents or referees can be shown red or yellow cards under new guidelines issued by England’s Football Association amid the COVID-19 pandemic.The instructions to referees taking charge of games when COVID-19 restrictions are in place will come into force immediately and be applied at all levels of the game. The FA document for referees said action should be taken when “the referee is certain someone deliberately, and from close range, coughed into the face of an opponent or match official…’’It added that the offence would fall under the category of “using offensive, insulting or abusive language and/or gestures”.It said: “If the incident was not severe enough to merit a sending-off, a caution could be issued for ‘unsporting behaviour – shows a lack of respect for the game’.”The document added that referees must not look to punish “routine” coughing and should remind players to avoid spitting on the ground, although it is not an act of misconduct.Reuters/NAN. Tags: COVID-19Disciplinary GuidelinesEnglish FAPlayer ConductRed Cardslast_img read more

Male athlete of the semester: Ethan Happ

first_imgFreshman Ethan Happ’s decision to redshirt last year may have salvaged Wisconsin’s season this year.For the better part of this season, Happ’s name was chained to comparisons of previous Badger great, Frank Kaminsky. Every time Happ was mentioned, immediate comments loaded with similarities to last year’s national player of the year followed.But for Happ, living up to the expectations left by one of the greatest basketball players in school history would only prove half the battle during his first year on the court.Understanding the value of learning from — rather than competing against — eventual first round draft picks Sam Dekker and Kaminsky in last year’s campaign led Happ to redshirt his first season with the Badgers.“Going against Frank and Nigel [Hayes] and Sam every day in practice made my game jump a lot more than playing six to eight minutes [off the bench] would have,” Happ said in October before the season began.Men’s basketball: Happ’s emergence vital in Badgers’ midseason resurgenceThis was not the year the University of Wisconsin men’s basketball anticipated. The Badgers, who entered the season ranked No. Read…Under new head coach Greg Gard, Happ quickly began to blossom into the player that many fans had expected to see one day, but certainly not this soon into his career. The forward began to rattle off double-doubles night after night, finishing the season with yet another freshman school record by claiming 10 of these feats in one season.All of a sudden a team that had started conference play in shambles, losing four of its first five games, was turning into a legitimate contender after rolling to a seven-game win streak.After Happ’s game-winning layup against Michigan State, Wisconsin would finish the regular season with 11 wins and only two losses, both of which came against top-15 opponents on the road.Men’s basketball: Happ’s game-winning layup pushes Wisconsin over No. 4 Michigan StateIt was another game for the Wisconsin men’s basketball team and another down-to-the-wire finish, and for the first time in Read…Happ’s integral role in the team’s success did not go unnoticed nationally either. Despite competition against freshmen projected as first-round NBA draft picks, Happ’s 12.4 points and 7.9 rebounds per game earned him the 2016 Big 10 Freshman of the Year award, becoming only the second player in school history to achieve this honor. He was named to the conference All-Defensive Team after leading the Big Ten in steals.Now with the team’s leading scorer junior forward Hayes uncertain about his future in Madison, Happ’s sophomore season could serve as a glimpse into the future success of University of Wisconsin’s men’s basketball for years to come.last_img read more