SUP Rejects Tuition Increment

first_imgThe Student Unification Party (SUP) of the University of Liberia on Wednesday issued a press statement rejecting tuition increment announced by the university administration.SUP declared that it will be a violation of the fiscal policy of the University should the increment take effect in the second semester of the academic year.SUP chairman Jerome D. Dangbuah said 95% of the students attending the state owned university are unemployed. “Therefore, 85% of the students depend on scholarships,” he said, “and any increment will cause many of them to drop out of school.”He said presently University of Liberia students are confronted with the lack of internet facilities, transportation, inadequate infrastructure and the absence of other basic social services that the administration must tackle before increasing tuition.According him, students over the years have paid for ID cards, computer literacy, t-shirts and other services that the administration has not been able to provide. Dangbuah reminded the administration that the University of Liberia was created by a Legislative Act which made it not for profit making.He said University of Liberia has the challenge to train more manpower for the various disciplines to improve the living standard of Liberians.Dangbuah meanwhile called on the National Legislature to increase the state-owned university’s fiscal budgetary appropriation from US$15.1 million to US$ 29 million.On the administration’s decision to increase tuition, he said SUP, representing the students, was not part of consultations that led to the decision to increase tuition.Dangbuah explained that already many students are finding it difficult to pay their tuition at the regular LD$175 per credit hour.He called on UL students to remain calm as efforts are underway to petition the National Legislature with their concerns for redress.It may be recalled that last Tuesday the UL Administration announced tuition increase from LD$175.00 per credit hour to USD$4 for undergraduate programs and US$55 to USD$75 for the Master’s degree program.Senator Jewel Howard Taylor, who is the chair person of the Board of Trustees, welcomed the administration’s decision. She said if the University of Liberia must be on par with other universities in Africa, then money is needed.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

One year to 2010

first_imgSouth Africans buying tickets are issued with this prepaid ticket card. (Image: South Africa 2010) Excited fans cheer for South Africa’snational team Bafana Bafana. (Image: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more photos, visit the image library.)Janine ErasmusFind out more about using MediaClubSouthAfrica.com materialIn exactly a year’s time one of the greatest sporting events in the world will take place for the first time on African soil. The long-awaited 2010 Fifa World Cup kicks off on 11 June 2010.But before then the country will see another football spectacle in the form of the Confederations Cup, viewed as the forerunner to the World Cup, and the chance to test security strategies, health services, and infrastructure.The tournament, which features eight top teams including the winners of each of Fifa’s six football confederations, the world champions Italy and hosts South Africa, runs from 14 to 28 June 2009.With a massive US$17.6-million (R142-million) in total up for grabs, of which the largest stake is the $3.25-million (R26-million) for the winner and the smallest cut $1.4-million (R11.3-million) for each of the four last-placed teams, the Confederations Cup is a prestigious event in its own right.South Africa has spent billions on renovating stadiums, improving transport, including airports and new bus rapid transport systems, and upgrading telecommunications.The country is in the process of rolling out its digital broadcasting infrastructure, which will see all 64 games of the World Cup broadcast in high definition to selected networks around the world.President Jacob Zuma, in his maiden State of the Nation address on 3 June, declared that all preparations were on track for a wonderful sporting event that would leave lasting benefits not just for the host country, but for the southern African region and all of Africa.“We have, as government and the nation at large, pledged that the World Cup will leave a proud legacy from which our children and our communities will benefit for many years to come,” he said.Stadiums will be readyAll ten venues are in advanced stages of construction, with half that number already complete.One of them, the Nelson Mandela multi-purpose stadium in Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape province, was unveiled this week ahead of the Confederations Cup.The stadium is the first newly-built stadium to be officially opened and will shortly be put through its paces with an international rugby match on 16 June between the British and Irish Lions, touring the country at the moment, and the invitational Southern Kings team.Both Fifa and the Union of European Football (Uefa) have expressed great satisfaction at the progress, in terms of physical preparations and ticket sales.Over 1.8-million applications from over 200 countries were received, of which just over half a million were allocated. While 44% of the applications came from South Africa, the majority that arrived from overseas indicates that football fans around the world are already planning their South African trip in June 2010.The second phase of ticket sales is currently underway and will run until 16 November 2009, or until the 100 000 available tickets have been snapped up.Former English Football Association chair Geoff Thompson described the stadiums as “superb”.“To have a World Cup in Africa is something many of us have dreamed of for years,” he said at a Uefa gathering in Denmark in March, “and without a doubt entrusting South Africa with the 2010 Fifa World Cup has been well placed.”The remaining five stadiums will all be complete by the end of 2009.National pridePublic opinion is running high and excitement and confidence is mounting amongst South Africans. A market research campaign commissioned by Fifa in January revealed that three-quarters of South Africans polled believed that the country will be ready and that the event would be a success.The survey, conducted by German research company SPORT+MARKT, also proved that a whopping 88% of South Africans are proud to be hosting the World Cup, and that three out of four believed that the tournament would further unite South Africans as a nation.It has taken five years for public sentiment to reach these levels, Back in 2004 when Fifa president Sepp Blatter made the announcement that the World Cup would travel to Africa, there was more a sense of trepidation than excitement. However, the January survey showed that 77% of respondents now feel more confident about the success of the tournament than they did in 2004.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Contact Janine Erasmus at  janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.Related articlesBrand SA unveils 2010 campaign Second chance for 2010 tickets Uefa praises SA’s 2010 readinessUseful linksFifa 2010 World Cup2009 Confederations CupSouth Africa 2010SPORT+MARKTlast_img read more

Delta’s new flight museum

first_imgMuseums, the best of them, tell a story. And the story the new Delta Flight Museum tells is dramatic. Tracing the history of one airline, the 68,000 square-foot facility, located on the northern reaches of Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport, manages to illuminate – in meticulous detail – the history of the airline industry as a whole. It does that by looking at Delta’s legacy, the constituent carriers that coalesced to form a global powerhouse. Northwest, Northeast, Western and Pan Am are all represented, as are other smaller airlines.The non-profit museum (there’s an admission fee) unfolds the saga via interactive information kiosks and assorted airline artifacts, the most compelling of which is a squadron of actual airliners. Out front Delta’s parked a 757-200, and a DC-9-50, both painted in the carrier’s classic “widget” livery. But it’s inside hangars One and Two respectively that the real show plays out.Enter the museum and take an immediate right turn. The first thing that catches your eye is an immaculately restored DC-3 proplliner – Ship 41, tail number NC2834. Take a while to drink in the classic design of the airplane. It’s polished bare-metal reflects the rays of sunlight that filter in the expansive hangar bay.Up ahead is a five-passenger, 90 mph Travel Air – the craft that launched Delta’s first passenger service between Dallas and Jackson, Mississippi. The Propeller Age artifacts arrayed in Hangar One include a toy Western Air Express bi-plane for the kids to play in. This AirlineRatings’ author’s grandchildren were fascinated by it. It was a tough to pry them away. They oohed and aahed and giggled and I explained to them how airplanes fly.Over along the far wall of Hangar One is a visual playground for adult aviation enthusiasts: early airline schedules from the carriers with which Delta merged, route maps that etch the carrier’s first east/west routes across the American South, cotton balls and chewing gum issued to flyers of an earlier era to muffle the sound of the piston engine and equalize pressure on their ears.Hangar Two houses the star of the show: a Boeing 767-200, The Spirit of Delta. Employees purchased the airplane for the carrier by raising $30 million.Enter the ship and grab a seat in first class. No charge for the upgrade. Peak inside the cockpit or head to the tail, along the way taking in displays of pilot and flight attendant uniforms of the early jet age.Down below, on the ground floor, get a preflight checklist and perform a walk around inspection of the massive seven-six, the way the first officer (co-pilot) does. A pamphlet lays out your beneath-the belly route, explaining each step in layman’s terms. By the time you reach the tail and crane your neck up at the elevators (which make the aircraft ascend and descend) you’ll have a decent idea of the fundamentals of flight.If the star of the show is the 767, the sexiest exhibit is the Boeing 737-200 flight simulator. The museum says it’s the only real full-motion flight “sim” open to the public in the United States. Take a look inside at no extra charge. “Fly” the seven-three for 45 minutes for US$395. You’ll have to call ahead for reservations.While the Delta Flight Museum isn’t far from Delta headquarters, it’s not immediately adjacent to the mid-field terminal complex of the world’s busiest airport. If you’re passing through ATL and want to see it best bet is to grab a cab.Find out more about the museum by going to the Web site at www.deltamuseum.org . Contact them via e-mail at museum.delta@delta.com. The phone number is 1-404-715-7886.The Delta Flight Museum won’t be mistaken for Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. But what it does, it does exceptionally well. If you’ve got a long layover in Atlanta you could spend your precious time in far less fascinating fashion.last_img read more

Airasia X and VietJet prove they’re safe with IOSA certificate

first_imgAirlineRatings.com regularly check all 430 airlines on the site to ensure their safety and in flight product ratings are accurate and up to date. Over the past few weeks there have been some significant safety and in flight product rating changes which we highlight below:Virgin Australia: In flight product rating change from 5/7 to 6/7. This change in rating reflects the improvements across domestic economy class to include meals, snacks and non alcoholic beverages complimentary on every flight.  You can read more about the change to in flight service on economy flights within Australia here.AirAsia X: Safety rating change from 4/7 to 6/7. AirAsia X, the long haul arm of AirAsia became, on April 11th 2015, the first of the AirAsia group to receive IOSA certification.  Airlineratings.com’s safety rating system, explained in full here, places a large emphasis on airlines having IOSA (IATA Operational Safety Audit) certification and to see AirAsia embark on this accreditation process is a great win for the thousands of passengers that fly with this succesful carrier every day.  AirlineRatings.com Editor In Chief, Geoffrey Thomas, states “The total accident rate for IOSA-registered carriers was more than three times better (1.09 vs. 3.32) than the rate for non-IOSA carriers over 2013/2014.”He continues, “Significant differences like this year after year proves that IOSA works and it is why we place so much emphasis on IOSA certification in our safety rating system.”         Read: Our on board review of AirAsia XWe will continue to update the public as more divisions of AirAsia are certified with IOSA. VietJet Air: Safety rating change from 3/7 to 5/7.VietJet Air, Vietnam’s number one Low Cost Carrier, like AirAsia X, has also applied for and received their IOSA certification resulting in a jump in their safety rating. VietJet Air now has the same safety rating as national flag carrier Vietnam Airlines.          Read: Our on board review of Vietjet Air. Questions or comments? Email us herelast_img read more

Video Young slam poetry contestant shares what colonialism means to her

first_imgAPTN NewsA slam poetry contest introduced the world to some pretty talented teenagers.Shauntelle Dick-Charleson from Hesquiaht & Lekwammen was one of them.A video was sent to APTN News that is also making the rounds on Facebook so we thought we’d share it. Got a video to share? Email us at news@aptn.calast_img

Citizens suffer during Traffic Week

first_imgCNG run auto rickshaw drivers are taking advantage of decreased public transport in the capital. Prothom Alo File PhotoCommuters in Dhaka city are suffering from acute public transport crisis amidst the ongoing Traffic Week of the Dhaka Metropolitan Police. Many vehicles are not plying on the city roads fearing punishment as they don’t have license. Taking advantage of the situation, drivers of CNG-run auto-rickshaws are charging extra fare from the passengers.Passengers said, the CNG drivers seldom go by the fare fixed by the government. The situation improved a little with the introduction of the ride-sharing apps, but the number of vehicles decreased in the city when the students launched demonstrations demanding road safety last week.The passengers, especially women, are the worst sufferers of the situation. Almost all the CNG drivers charge extra fare than the one shown on the metre. Worse, they often refuse to go to the desired destination of the passengers.A passenger named Salma Ahmed said, she paid Tk 250 for coming to Sher-e-Bangla Nagar Hospital from Dhanmondi Road No 7 while the fare is Tk 130 according to the metre.The government in 2015 fixed the fare of CNG-run auto-rickshaw. As per the decision, the driver has to pay the owners Tk 900 per day. The fare is Tk 40 for the first two kilometres, Tk 12 for each kilometre after the first two and Tk 2 per minute for waiting period.Asked about the reason for flouting the government fixed fares and not going by metre, CNG driver Jamal Mia said, the auto-rickshaw is not allowed to ply on many city roads. Moreover they have many expenses that are not possible to meet when they go by metres.Dhaka Metropolitan CNG Autorickshaw Owners’ Association president Barkat Ullah said, the number of CNG autorickshaws has decreased as many are being re-registered, which takes around one month.He agreed that the drivers are charging extra fares as the overall number of public transport providing vehicles has lessened.Bangladesh Passengers Welfare Association’s secretary general Mozammel Haque Chowdhury said the passengers are lone sufferers of the irregularities in the public transport sector. Whenever there is shortage of public transport providing vehicles, the drivers charge extra fares, holding the passengers hostage.last_img read more

IMA slams idea of Bridge Course for dentists

first_imgKolkata: The Indian Medical Association (IMA) has condemned the idea of ‘Bridge Course’ to create cadres of mid-level health practitioners by allowing dentists to practice mainstream medicine in various health centres.Niti Aayog, along with the health ministry, is examining a proposal to introduce Bridge Course for the dentists so that they can be used as mid-level health providers in various health centres across the state, particularly where there is a crisis of MBBS doctors. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataDr Santanu Sen, national president of IMA, declared that there is no shortage of doctors in the country. “Around 63,250 MBBS graduates come out of 494 medical colleges in the country. But India has only 23,729 post graduate seats,” Dr Sen said. “The fact remains that the government does not have the capacity to absorb the rest of them. Every year the unemployment among young medical graduates is a great cause of concern. The frustration of these youngsters with an undergraduate degree has to be addressed first,” he added. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateCondemning the idea of mid-level practitioners, IMA secretary general Dr RV Asokan said the government’s attempt to provide half baked medical care to the citizens through mid-level practitioners is dangerous. “The government should give permanent posting to MBBS graduates in 1.5 lakh health and wellness centres. Ad Hoc postings are not acceptable,” he said. It may be mentioned here that a meeting on this proposal is scheduled to be held at Niti Aayog on April 22.last_img read more

Searching for my inner Van Gogh on an Active Discovery sailing with

first_imgSearching for my inner Van Gogh on an Active Discovery sailing with Avalon Waterways Share << Previous PostNext Post >> Tags: Avalon Waterways, Britain & Europe, River Cruising Thursday, December 28, 2017 WURZBURG — It’s a rather unusual pursuit, coming off a European river ship. Strolling through the streets of scenic Wurzburg on the Main River, our small group winds our way toward a rather lofty goal: the city’s famous hilltop, 12th-century castle. “It remains relatively unexplored, mostly because it’s hard to get to,” our guide, Florian Brunn, explains.Soon, I see what he’s talking about. Digging into the paved path, we begin to ascend and I try to act cool as my heart begins to pound and a light sheen of sweat pops on my brow. “Most people who see it, only do so from the sun decks of river ships,” says Brunn with a light German accent, encouraging me as I lay my foot onto the bottom step of a staircase that disappears into a small hillside forest – and, to my eye, seems to stretch to the sky.Marienberg Fortress, WurzburgI’m on board the Avalon Expression, one of Avalon’s fleet of 18 river ships plying the waterways of Europe and Southeast Asia. Seeking a younger demographic (the current, typical age of a river cruiser is around 65), Avalon has introduced a new type of itinerary, called Active Discovery cruises. They debuted this year on the Danube (sailing nine days between Linz and Budapest) and will be rolled out next year on the Rhine (eight days between Amsterdam and either Frankfurt or Wiesbaden in Germany). Itineraries differ from traditional Avalon cruises, offering shorter sailing times and more time to explore in port, as well as different ports of call.Supported by a North American ad campaign that features an attractive, young-ish couple navigating adventurous paths before flopping on the bed of their Panorama Suite, these cruises offer options for deeper discovery. My sneak peek took me along the Rhine and Main from Amsterdam to Nuremberg. Each day on an Active Discovery itinerary, cruisers are offered three tour options – the usual, classic excursions, plus an active choice (hiking, biking) and a discovery option (a culturally rich, immersive experience). It’s Avalon’s fastest growing category, and the company is already seeing younger cruisers and multi-generation groups on these Active Discovery voyages.More news:  Transat calls Groupe Mach’s latest offer “highly abusive, coercive and misleading”On the second day of my cruise, I experience a ‘discovery’ option, walking a few blocks from the ship to an art studio called Ateliers Westerdok, where I’m welcomed with tea, Dutch apple pie, stroopwafels – and a lecture on, arguably, this country’s most famous artist. Showing our small group some of his early work, which depicts the streets of this city, instructor Sanne Verdult told us, somewhat ambitiously, “You have everything you need to make your own Van Gogh today.”Van Gogh MuseumVan Gogh, I am not – and my efforts on the canvas demonstrated that clearly for all of those willing to take a look at the work my brushstrokes produced. Verdult gave us some practical instruction on our use of colour (cool versus warm) and other techniques, like the use of shadows to give texture, then presented a choice of still-life muses. I went for a flourishing plume of flowers, slathering acrylic paint in a tangential interpretation that only somewhat resembled the beauty before me.But, it felt good – to have brush in hand, creating an artwork (of sorts) in the country that produced Van Gogh, and Rembrandt, and so many others. Rather than just seeing their masterpieces in the Rijksmuseum, I was creating, and so was everybody else around me. Half the fun was walking around and seeing the other canvases, and how my fellow-painters had interpreted the items before us.RijksmuseumThe active discovery continued as we rolled down the river. In Rüdesheim, a place famous for its Riesling, we rode a cable car to a hilltop, then, led by a local winery owner, hiked back to town through the vineyards, stopping for a tasting from the back of a truck halfway down.More news:  Consolidation in the cruise industry as PONANT set to acquire Paul Gauguin CruisesIn Bamberg the group wound through the streets of that scenic town on bicycles. In Cologne, we went off the beaten path with an immersive neighbourhood tour, the guide leading through the funky, quirky charms of the Belgian Quarter, a favourite part of the city for locals to shop and drink, and almost entirely unvisited by tourists.BambergAnd while we could have augmented our healthy activities by dining on Avalon Fresh – a menu created exclusively for the company by the chefs at Wrenkh, a Michelin-starred vegetarian restaurant in Vienna – we instead opted for the decadent, multiple courses at the small Panorama Bistro near the bow of the ship.And, of course, in Wurzburg, we hiked toward the sky. Actually, as luck would have it, the path soon evened out and took us right through the thick walls of the castle, which dated all the way back to 1168. Luxuriating in the space – we were practically the only ones there – we toured the sumptuous, well-guarded home of prince bishops from the 12th to the 18th centuries. And then I descended, again, through vineyards, feeling a little smug that I’d seen something special – and indeed, a place that few will ever have the chance to experience. By: Tim Johnsonlast_img read more