Warriors Looking Forward: Golden State’s 3-1 lead over L.A. Clippers, looking ahead to Houston

first_img[vemba-video id=”van/sc/2019/04/22/bang_40f95716-d8b6-47de-aa54-81fdfc7bd55f”]Video: Mark Medina discusses the teams upcoming game 5Since giving up a 31-point lead last week in a Game 2 loss to the Los Angeles Clippers, the Golden State Warriors have won back-to-back games in Los Angeles, including a 113-105 win on Sunday. The win gives the team a 3-1 lead in the series and the opportunity to wrap things up on Wednesday at Oracle Arena.Assuming the Warriors win the upcoming game versus the …last_img

Career guidance initiative launched

first_imgNedbank and Primestars are joined byPPC Cement, Gauteng City RegionAcademy, Quest, the South AfricanInstitute of Chartered Accountants,the National Youth DevelopmentAgency and the JD Group assponsors of the programme. Martin Sweet says the project is aimedat inspiring youngsters to play a key rolein overcoming the current projected skillsshortage and the high rate ofunemployment in South Africa.(Images: Ray Maota) MEDIA CONTACTS • Nkosinathi MsizaSenior Communications ManagerNedbank+27 11 295 3560RELATED ARTICLES• Nedbank invests in water project• Nedbank branch runs on wind power• Pens for needy children • Education goes mobile with Vodacom• Can drive raises R8.5m for educationRay MaotaNedbank, one of South Africa’s big four banks, has launched a career guidance initiative for underprivileged high school students that will benefit more than 40 000 pupils in grades 9 to 12 across the country.The launch took place at the Michelangelo Towers hotel on Nelson Mandela Square in Sandton on 15 February 2012, emceed by popular 5FM radio and television presenters, Anele Mdoda and Gareth Cliff.Early career guidanceIn the third year of this initiative, the bank will invest more than R5-million in its My Future My Career programme. It will promote more than 100 career choices across 14 industries and will enable the pupils to discover the academic as well as personality requirements of each career.The students will gain insight into these careers through movie episodes shown at Ster-Kinekor theatres around the country. They will also learn from professionals in the working world what to expect in these careers.Kone Gugushe, Nedbank’s divisional executive for corporate social responsibility, said: “Time and again we see too many students showing up at universities without a clue of what they want to and, more importantly, can study,” Gugushe said.He added that the programme will give students insight into careers and improve the prospects of developing skills in critical sectors such as financial services, health and engineering.The programme, which is endorsed by the Department of Basic Education, was conceptualised by Primestars Marketing, which is also the project manager.Martin Sweet, managing director of Primestars Marketing, said that the project hopes to inspire youngsters to play a key role in overcoming the current projected skills shortage and the high rate of unemployment in South Africa.Through the programme, young people will also be encouraged to explore and take full advantage of the career opportunities.Nedbank and Primestars are joined by PPC Cement, Gauteng City Region Academy, Quest, the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants, the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) and the JD Group as sponsors of the programme.Where to catch the screeningsScreenings will include the following careers: accounting, law, entrepreneurship, mining and engineering, education, health, IT, construction, travel and tourism. Each pupil who attends a screening will leave with a reference booklet on that particular career.The screenings start on 26 February, with the subjects of entrepreneurship and tourism; on 4 March, it is the turn of IT and communications; on 11 March, mining, engineering and construction; on 18 March, banking, finance and accounting; on 15 April, criminal justice and law; on 22 April, health services and education; and on 29 April, arts and culture, and transport, logistics and distribution.They will take place at various theatres countrywide – in Gauteng at Brooklyn in Pretoria; at Eastgate; Sandton; Maponya Mall; Southgate; Eastrand Mall and Westgate in Johannesburg; in Northern Cape at North Cape Mall in Kimberley; in Free State at Mimosa Mall in Bloemfontein; in North West at Rustenburg; in Limpopo at Savannah Mall in Polokwane; and in Kwazulu-Natal at Gateway and Musgrave in Durban.In Western Cape pupils can catch the screenings at Cape Gate and Cavendish in Cape Town; while in the Eastern Cape, they will be at The Bridge in Port Elizabeth and Vincent Park in East London.“The JD Group realises the challenges and the effects of unemployment in South Africa, particularly among the youth of the country. It is with this mind that we partnered with the My Future, My Career initiative,” said Richard Chauke, a director at JD Group.These career episodes will also be screened at 13 NYDA youth centres across the country.The Nedbank FoundationThe Nedbank Foundation is the primary corporate social investment arm of Nedbank.Early this year it launched its Back to School campaign at Ga-Masemola village in Limpopo, where 150 pupils from four schools in the area received essential school items such as uniforms, shoes, stationery, books, bags and sports kits, to start their school year on a high note.It also has other projects that benefit underprivileged students, such as the Nedbank Fundisa Maths and Science Project, under which maths and science teachers in Eastern Cape and Limpopo are enrolled at Unisa for a one-year course on improving their classroom teaching techniques.The foundation also runs the Nedbank Mobile Library Project, the Matric Exam Revision Programme, and the M2 Mathematics Project.last_img read more

How Nissan Will Roll Out Self-Driving Cars: Fricking Lasers

first_imgCloud Hosting for WordPress: Why Everyone is Mo… bradley berman Serverless Backups: Viable Data Protection for … Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img How Intelligent Data Addresses the Chasm in Cloud Tags:#autonomous vehicles#Drive#Infiniti#Infiniti Q50#Nissan#Self-Driving#self-parking cars#Tetsuya Iijima ReadWriteDrive is an ongoing series covering the future of transportation.It was an improbably futuristic scene: A man standing on a sunbaked tarmac in Irvine, Calif., next to a Nissan Leaf electric car, pushed a button on the hatchback’s key fob. The Leaf, unassisted by human intervention or preprogrammed maps, crawled at about five miles per hour through rows of parked vehicles, detected an SUV pulling out of a space, paused, and allowed the SUV to pull away. Then it moved past the now-vacated parking spot, slowed into position, glided back into the space, and powered down.A moment later, the man pushed the button again, and the Leaf fetched itself, reversing its previous steps, and returned to the man’s side.This isn’t science fiction. I watched this all myself, dumbfounded, just a little over a week ago.Was this self-parking demonstration a bit of razzle-dazzle that will never make it into the vehicles in dealer lots? Maybe not.Taking the “crash” out of “crash test dummy”: A Nissan Leaf automatically avoids obstacles.To witness this scene, I drove 45 miles in a 2014 Infiniti Q50 sedan from LAX to the decommissioned El Toro Marine Corps Air Station. (That’s where Nissan held its month-long Nissan 360 technology showcase.) The Q50 was equipped with the luxury car’s $3,200 tech package , which pushes the nicely appointed vehicle’s price over $50,000.The relevant features of the teched-up Q50 are Intelligent Cruise Control and Active Lane Control. The technology allowed me to travel at highway speeds along short, straight stretches of the 405 and the 5, with my foot off the pedals and my hands at my side.Take that, Google! The search engine is investing an unknown amount in self-driving cars, and those prototypes have driven millions of miles. Google promises to offer the technology to consumers by 2018, but the Q50 is on sale today.Proto-AutomationThe Q50’s camera located in front of the rearview mirror, along with its image-processing system, can read lines and dashes on the roadway.  When the vehicle gets close to the white paint separating lanes, the car gently nudges the steering wheel in the direction of safety.  But here’s a problem that I experienced: When the car approached the white line to the left, it overcorrected, sending me across the lane to the right-side boundary, where the camera and computer nudged me back again across the lane to the left line.  With my hands off the steering wheel, the Q50 became a careening, 3,500-pound ping-pong ball.  In fairness, the visual guidance technology in the Q50 is not meant to fully automate driving.  It’s intended to play an assist role, which according to Infiniti—Nissan’s upscale division—reduces driver fatigue and otherwise enhances the vehicle’s luxury feel. It worked as intended.An experimental Nissan Leaf parks itself.Similarly, the Q50’s Forward Assist technology was effective.  Set the cruise control to, say, 65 miles per hour, and lift your foot off the accelerator.  That’s plain ol’ cruise control, right?  But thanks to a radar system behind the front bumper, the car can detect the speed of cars ahead in the same lane, and automatically slow down the Q50 to match their pace—all the way down to a complete stop, only to resume acceleration when the car ahead gets going. This is an increasingly common automotive feature, usually called adaptive cruise control.  A related safety feature rapidly and automatically applies brakes when the vehicle in front comes to a screeching halt.Driving Back to the FutureThese early manifestations of autonomous driving technologies already seem unremarkable.  But what’s surprising is that the fully automated Leaf on display in Irvine uses the same exact camera, image-processing technology, and radar found in the Q50.“To find objects that are approaching from far away very fast, radar is the best technology,” explained Tetsuya Iijima, general manager of intelligent transportation systems engineering at Nissan. “But unlike the driver-assisting features on the Q50, fully automated technology can’t make any excuses to the customer.”So Iijima and his team of engineers employ more serious automagical mojo: six laser scanners that surround the car.  And not just the fixed broad-beam or one-dimensional lasers already used in auto-safety systems from Continental and other suppliers. These are three-dimensional ones that scan left, right, up, and down, to make a full spatial rendering of all road objects on the fly.  Three radars are still used, one in front and two in back, as well as five cameras that can read speed-limit signs (to modulate speed according to the highway rules) and the color of traffic signals (to know when to stop and go at an intersection).  Add 12 sonars, and you now have a Leaf electric car that can travel autonomously and safely on highways—and do that cool robotic-parking trick as well.  Iijima demonstrated those two feats in two separate vehicles—each equipped with precisely the same hardware, but programmed for either highway travel or automated parking.  Nissan executives said that these automated features will go on sale in 2020—and will become available a few years later in a wide range of models. The Secret Sauce: Fricking Laser ScannersSeveral carmakers already offer features similar to the ones available in the Infiniti Q50, and are making claims about fully automated driving coming in the not-too-distant future—although most do not give timetables. The reason Nissan thinks it can set a date is that it has committed to laser technology.“We believe that we are leading this technology,” said Iijima. “Other companies still have not decided to use a laser scanner. We have come to the conclusion that laser scanners are required. The image is a regular three-dimensional picture. Each point has depth information.”The Google car uses a relatively large roof-mounted LIDAR system, using 64 lasers in a spinning 360-degree turret to create a high-resolution map accurate to about 11 centimeters, according to Popular Science.   The autonomous Leaf embeds six fixed laser scanners—around the car in corner body panels and into rear-passenger doors—each one providing resolution to 1 centimeter, according to Nissan.Iijima declined to identify the companies that Nissan is considering to supply the three-dimensional laser hardware or what it might cost. Nissan is developing its own software that filters all the various inputs, and integrates the data into steering-wheel position, acceleration levels, and braking. It’s Big Data on wheels. The intricate integration of hardware and software will take an alliance of companies, according to Iijima.The gear needed to make a Nissan Leaf drive itself.But Nissan has ruled out one type of technology, at least for the next few years—intelligent GPS-based geographical mapping, in the vein of Google Maps or Nokia’s Here. The info gathered from those mapping services is not detailed enough, according to Iijima. Also forget vehicle-to-vehicle or vehicle-to-infrastructure communications that will take decades to penetrate across enough cars and roadways to become useful.The cool self-parking car, unlike similar systems unveiled from Audi and Volvo, does not require GPS or any sensors or transmitters applied to the pavement.  Instead, as Iijima believes, vehicle automation should work with on-board sensors.  (Nonetheless, Nissan is working on a parallel development using precise maps that will enable cars to run autonomously in more challenging city environments.)  For now, Nissan is only talking about tackling the simpler challenge of highway driving and automated parking. The Beginning Of The End Of DrivingIijima outlined some limitations to the system: a max speed of 80 miles per hour and difficulty in extreme weather conditions, like a snowstorm.  He said that his work now focused on increasing processing power, reducing cost, and shrinking the size of the hardware that currently occupies the entire hatch space—down to about the size of a shoebox that could fit into the engine compartment.The software, which Nissan developed in-house with unnamed partners, is not unusual.“It’s C++,” Iijima said with a chuckle.  And ironically, the most important required infrastructure is … white paint.  “The white line defines the road,” he said.  “It’s minimal infrastructure.” What’s at stake with this program?  Big stuff. The promise of zero fatalities.  The ability for elderly and disabled people to gain mobility.  More efficient use of fuel and roadways.  And nothing less than a complete transformation of the relationship between car and driver.“When the driver is no longer necessary, there is no need for cars to be owned by individuals,” he said. He envisions a world of shared autonomous mobility robots roaming global roadways by 2030.  Yet, there’s no single finish line set to be crossed in the distant future, but rather a slow and steady supplanting of human drivers by onboard computers, cameras, radar, sonar and lasers.last_img read more

Blog: Sania-Paes thrash St Lucia in CWG mixed doubles tie

first_img7.20 pm –  Sania and Paes beat the St Lucians 6-1, 6-0 in the first round of the mixed doubles event at the Commonwealth Games.7.15 pm – Sania and Paes coast towards win, up 4-1 in second set.  7.10 pm – Paes and Sania lead 3-1 in second set.7.05 pm – Indian pair leads 1-0 in second set.6.50 pm – Paes and Sania win first set 6-1, opponents are clueless.6.40 pm – Paes and Sania go up a break to lead 2-1 against Alberton Richelieu and Stacey Roehman, opponenets from St Lucia.6.35 pm – Attendance sparse. Probably because it being an opening day. Security is very tight again.6.30 pm – Sania and Leander on court. Huge welcome for mixed doubles pair at centre court, RK Khanna Stadium.last_img