Dreamers should all serve in military first

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionI am a disabled veteran of World War II. To all you liberal Democrats: You don’t know what it is to suffer for this great country of ours.You want everything, but you will not sacrifice anything for this great country. You want the Dreamers to become citizens. Regarding Dec. 7, 1941, if we where all liberals and let the Japanese take over our great country, would you have the freedom we have now? If you want the Dreamers to be citizens of our great country, let them serve four years in the military — active duty — and then they will be come good citizens of this great country of ours.Thank God, we have a president that is trying to protect us. Vincent BelardoAlbanyMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFeds: Albany man sentenced for role in romance scamFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more

Viral video prompts outpouring for bullied Australian boy

first_imgAn Australian boy with dwarfism who was bullied to the point he wanted to “die right now” has received a deluge of celebrity messages and donations for a trip to Disneyland.A video of nine-year-old Quaden Bayles uploaded to Facebook by his mother showed him crying and repeatedly saying he wanted to die after being bullied at school.9 year old wanting to commit suicide due to being bullied. 💔💔💔🥺 pic.twitter.com/DysTrmlaiD— YouDontNeedToKnowMyName (@S11E11B11A) February 20, 2020The clip had been watched more than 16 million times by Friday and the boy’s mother, Yarraka Bayles, said she was sharing it to raise awareness of the impact bullying was having on her child. Topics : “I’ve got a son that is suicidal almost every single day,” she says in the footage.Support for the boy built as the video spread online, and a GoFundMe page started by US comedian Brad Williams had raised over $150,000 to give Bayles a trip to Disneyland in California by Friday.”This isn’t just for Quaden, this is for anyone who has been bullied in their lives and told they weren’t good enough,” Williams, who was also born with achondroplasia — the most common type of dwarfism — wrote on the fundraiser page.Williams said extra funds would be given to anti-bullying charities. Australian actor Hugh Jackman and NBA player Enes Kanter were among the hundreds of thousands posting support for Bayles.”Quaden you are stronger than you know, mate. And no matter what, you have a friend in me,” Jackman said in a video posted to his Twitter account.Quaden – you’ve got a friend in me. #BeKind @LokelaniHiga https://t.co/8dr3j2z8Sy pic.twitter.com/jyqtZYC953— Hugh Jackman (@RealHughJackman) February 20, 2020Bayles will also lead the Indigenous All-Stars out onto the field in their rugby league clash with the Maori All Stars in Queensland on Saturday.last_img read more

IMF, World Bank say ready to address economic challenges of coronavirus

first_imgThe outbreak is plunging the world economy into its worst downturn since the global financial crisis more than a decade ago, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development warned on Monday, urging governments and central banks to fight back to avoid an even steeper slump.Finance ministers from the world’s seven largest economies (G7) are expected to hold a conference call on Tuesday to discuss measures to deal with the economic impact of the coronavirus outbreak, four sources told Reuters.The IMF said it had an array of facilities and instruments in its tool kit to help countries respond to the economic impact of the coronavirus.The Rapid Credit Facility (RCF) and Rapid Financing Instrument (RFI), which can provide emergency financial assistance to member countries that can be quickly disbursed, was used in 2016 to help Ecuador after a major earthquake. The International Monetary Fund and the World Bank on Monday said they stood ready to help member countries address the human and economic challenges of the fast-spreading coronavirus outbreak, including through emergency funding.In a joint statement, the two institutions said they were focused especially on poor countries where health systems are weakest, and urged member countries to strengthen their health surveillance and response systems to contain the virus.“International cooperation is essential to deal with the health and economic impact of the COVID-19 virus,” the statement said, referring to the acronym for the virus. It said both the IMF and World Bank were fully committed to supporting these efforts. Topics :center_img The IMF can also augment existing lending programs to accommodate urgent needs related to the outbreak. For instance, it provided extra funds to Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone in 2014 to fight the Ebola outbreak.It also has grants for debt relief that can help the poorest countries address disasters and can provide support through new stand-by financing arrangements. In addition, it can help countries expand their capacity to deal with the outbreak.On Thursday, IMF spokesman Gerry Rice told reporters that the Fund had not received any requests for assistance.Somali Finance Minister Abdirahman Duale Beileh told Reuters last week in an interview that many African countries were anxiously monitoring the spread of the flu-like virus, which has infected more than 89,000 people worldwide and killed over 3,000, mostly in China.“Everybody is concerned. We are just hoping that it doesn’t come to us. If that thing comes to Africa, we’re all dead because we don’t have the facilities,” Beileh said on Friday.last_img read more

Papua restricts entry as concerns mount over lack of facilities to treat COVID-19

first_imgPapuan People’s Assembly chairman Timotius Murib emphasized that restricting access to Papua was needed to prevent a surge of COVID-19 cases.“We appreciate this decision. It is the right course of action to protect indigenous Papuans from the threat of death,” he told The Jakarta Post on Monday.Timotius hoped this was a positive sign that Papua could overcome the spread of the novel coronavirus and asked for the public’s participation to fight the disease.“This does not mean that the people [in Papua] are free to move around. [They should] adhere to the government’s appeal not to gather and to stay at home,” he said.Papua has limited daily community activities to eight hours, from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meanwhile, large gatherings, including religious worship, were restricted starting on Wednesday.Separately, Papua COVID-19 response team spokesperson Silwanus Sumule conceded that the handling of COVID-19 in Papua was a cause for concern because the province lacked the necessary medical equipment, including rapid testing kits to examine swab samples from suspected patients.Read also: Greater Jakarta failing as floodgate to nationwide COVID-19 epidemic“We need seven to 10 hours to examine a sample. Indeed, we have received information that the Health Ministry will send us as many as 2,400 rapid testing kits. This is what we are expecting,” Sumule said.He added that Papua had only 45 hospitals, 15 of which were referral hospitals for coronavirus cases. Combined, they have 202 isolation rooms and can accommodate up to 4,500 patients.“If [COVID-19] affected 20 percent of Papua’s populations, that means 800,000 people would be infected. Of those, perhaps 160,000 would need to be treated in hospitals and 8,000 treated in isolation rooms,” he said.In such a scenario, Papua would struggle to treat its own residents, let alone visitors from outside the province, he added.Papua has recorded three confirmed COVID-19 cases as of Tuesday, with at least 19 people under surveillance and 716 people under monitoring.“Five among the 716 people are foreigners. Meanwhile, the 19 people under surveillance comprise six in Merauke, two in Biak, one in Mimika, nine in Jayapura city and one in Jayapura regency.” (syk) Papua is set to restrict entry into the province both through sea and air travel in an effort to stem the spread of COVID-19 in Indonesia’s easternmost region.Papua Governor Lukas Enembe, together with members of the Regional Leadership Communication Forum, announced the measure shortly after the province’s first two COVID-19 positive cases were revealed on Sunday.”This is not a lockdown; only a restriction. However, we are considering whether it is necessary to completely block [access to] Papua to protect Lapago, Meepago and Animha because they are particularly vulnerable,” Lukas said during a meeting in Jayapura on Monday. The three areas are Papua’s indigenous territories. Lapago and Meepago have nine regencies and five regencies, respectively, both located in the Central Highlands of Papua, while Animha, located in South Papua, has four regencies. The travel restrictions exclude the transportation of goods into the province, Lukas said, asserting that the distribution of various supplies would continue as usual.“The policy takes effect on Thursday and will be in place for the next 14 days,” he said, adding that the provincial administration would evaluate the policy at the end of the two-week period.Read also: Explainer: Will Indonesia be Southeast Asia’s Italy? A review of how the nation is battling COVID-19center_img Topics :last_img read more