SUP Rejects Tuition Increment

first_imgThe Student Unification Party (SUP) of the University of Liberia on Wednesday issued a press statement rejecting tuition increment announced by the university administration.SUP declared that it will be a violation of the fiscal policy of the University should the increment take effect in the second semester of the academic year.SUP chairman Jerome D. Dangbuah said 95% of the students attending the state owned university are unemployed. “Therefore, 85% of the students depend on scholarships,” he said, “and any increment will cause many of them to drop out of school.”He said presently University of Liberia students are confronted with the lack of internet facilities, transportation, inadequate infrastructure and the absence of other basic social services that the administration must tackle before increasing tuition.According him, students over the years have paid for ID cards, computer literacy, t-shirts and other services that the administration has not been able to provide. Dangbuah reminded the administration that the University of Liberia was created by a Legislative Act which made it not for profit making.He said University of Liberia has the challenge to train more manpower for the various disciplines to improve the living standard of Liberians.Dangbuah meanwhile called on the National Legislature to increase the state-owned university’s fiscal budgetary appropriation from US$15.1 million to US$ 29 million.On the administration’s decision to increase tuition, he said SUP, representing the students, was not part of consultations that led to the decision to increase tuition.Dangbuah explained that already many students are finding it difficult to pay their tuition at the regular LD$175 per credit hour.He called on UL students to remain calm as efforts are underway to petition the National Legislature with their concerns for redress.It may be recalled that last Tuesday the UL Administration announced tuition increase from LD$175.00 per credit hour to USD$4 for undergraduate programs and US$55 to USD$75 for the Master’s degree program.Senator Jewel Howard Taylor, who is the chair person of the Board of Trustees, welcomed the administration’s decision. She said if the University of Liberia must be on par with other universities in Africa, then money is needed.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Colton star may return Friday

first_imgShareece Wright’s broken left hand is healing ahead of schedule, according to Colton High School football coach Harold Strauss. Wright, a star running back/defensive back for the Yellowjackets, had X-rays taken Tuesday at Arrowhead Regional Medical Center. Strauss said Wright is able to move his fingers and could play defense in a short cast on Friday when the Yellowjackets meet Redlands at the University of Redlands. Or if Colton elects to hold him out of Friday’s game, Strauss said Wright could return at full force the following week, to play both offense and defense. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week “We’ll see what they say at the (Riverside) Sport Clinic,” said Strauss, who said Sport Clinic personnel is going to examine the hand today. Wright injured his hand in the second half of Colton’s loss to Los Angeles Crenshaw on Sept. 23. After being treated, it was estimated that he would miss anywhere from four weeks to the rest of the season. Despite playing in just two-plus games, he ranks fifth in the county in rushing with 605 yards on 35 carries (17.3 average) with six touchdowns. Both Colton linebacker Allen Bradford and Wright are being heavily recruited, with coaches from California, Arizona and Oregon showing up at last Friday’s game against Yucaipa, a 66-0 Yellowjackets victory. center_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Everton star linked with move

first_imgChelsea are set to table a bid for Everton star Jack Rodwell when the transfer window opens next month, according to the Daily Mirror.The promising midfielder is said to be rated at £20m by Everton, who are determined to keep him at Goodison Park.The Mirror also suggest that Chelsea duo Florent Malouda and Salomon Kalou are being offered big-money moves to Russia.Zamora’s future is in doubt.Malouda is said to be wanted by mega-rich club Anzhi Makhachkala while Kalou, whose contract expires at the end of the season, is believed to be a target for both Lokomotiv Moscow and billionaire-backed Anzhi, who would be willing to double his current wages.Metro say Bolton are ready to cash in on England defender Gary Cahill, who has been linked with Chelsea, Tottenham and Arsenal.And Bobby Zamora’s future at Fulham remains under scrutiny, with the Daily Mail reporting that the striker has been told to train with the reserves.This page is updated throughout the day. Monday’s Paper Talk: Local clubs linked with swoopslast_img read more

Soweto to Oxford and beyond

first_imgTamara O’ReillyIf the Rhodes Scholarship Trust were looking for a poster boy, Nhlanhla Dlamini would probably make the cut.As the latest recipient of the generous and prestigious Rhodes scholarship, 23-year-old Dlamini possesses all the certificates, medals, blazers and fancy “colours” that have come to be expected of applicants.The scholarship, founded by Cecil John Rhodes more than a century ago, will see him begin reading for his Masters in African Studies in September 2008 at University of Oxford, England. Dlamini views this as a vital step in achieving his goal of playing an active role in the broader development of his community, and ultimately Africa.“I understand that my analysis of Africa’s problems is incomprehensive. It is this acknowledgment that leads me to want to pursue a Masters in African Studies,” he says. “It will broaden my knowledge of African economics, history and sociology – three essential areas in understanding Africa’s context and challenges. By being in a class that will explore socio-economic concepts in Africa, I will be able to deepen my passion for my continent by grounding it in evidence and research.”His selection, over several other hopefuls from the Gauteng, North West, Limpopo, and Mpumalanga regions who no doubt displayed credentials that were also admirable, has not surprisingly been stunning.“I am extremely grateful at this stage to all those who have influenced me and contributed to moulding me into the person I am today,” says Dlamini. “Everyone has been overwhelmingly congratulatory and happy for me. It’s been a humbling reminder just how many friends and family members I have who are always rooting for me.”‘Resigned to a life of hardship’Although he was born in Soweto, at age seven his family moved to a traditionally white suburb and he was transferred to a multiracial school.Beyond the challenges of acculturation, both his parents were also retrenched from their jobs in the early 1990s, resulting in significant financial woes for his family.“I was convinced at the time that my family and I were resigned to a life of hardship,” says Dlamini.In 1992, what he calls a “seemingly small event” changed his outlook on what he could achieve academically.“At the end of Standard One [now Grade Three], I was invited to a prizegiving. I knew nothing of prize giving or what actually happens at such evenings. It turned out I was awarded the “Most Conscientious Student “ award. For the first time since I had moved to my new school, my background didn’t matter. It didn’t matter that I came to school in a jalopy or that I was part of an awkward minority in the school.”By the end of his secondary education at Marist Brothers College in 2001, Dlamini finished top of his class with five distinctions and full academic colours. He had also by then amassed several other awards in the areas of academics and community work. In Grade 11, he became the first pupil in the school’s history to be awarded an Honours Blazer, an accolade usually reserved for final year students.In 2002 he enrolled for a BCom Degree in Information Systems at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg. He graduated cum laude, making the Dean’s Merit List every year and pronounced Wits University Council’s Academic Merit Scholar from 2002 to 2004.Dlamini is an avid sportsman with several school and university captaincies to his name in the games of rugby and soccer. He is a national silver medalist in martial arts.He is currently employed in Atlanta, USA as a consultant for McKinsey & Company, a firm that advises leading companies on strategies around operations, staff and advancing their business.Dlamini returns to South Africa in March 2008 and he has left the six months remaining until he begins at Oxford without serious commitment for now, affording him well-deserved time to “tie up loose ends and perhaps take a road trip through the country”.Useful linksRhodes Scholarship WebsiteWits Universitylast_img read more

Aids-free generation achievable: UN

first_img1 December 2010An Aids-free generation is achievable if the international community steps up provision of universal access to HIV prevention, treatment and social protection, while focusing on the most disadvantaged communities affected by HIV, says a new UN report marking World Aids Day.According to “Children and Aids: Fifth Stocktaking Report 2010”, released in New York on Tuesday, while children worldwide have benefited enormously from stronger Aids responses, “there are millions of women and children who have fallen through the cracks due to inequities rooted in gender, economic status, geographical location, education level and social status.“To achieve an Aids-free generation we need to do more to reach the hardest hit communities,” Anthony Lake, executive director of the United Nations Children’s Fund (Unicef), said in a statement. “Every day, nearly 1 000 babies in sub-Sarahan Africa are infected with HIV through mother-to-child transmission.“Our Fifth Stocktaking Report on Children and Aids highlights innovations like the Mother Baby Pack that can bring life-saving antiretroviral (ARV) treatment to more mothers and their babies than ever before.”According to the report, in low- and middle-income countries, 53% of pregnant women living with HIV received ARVs to prevent mother-to-child transmission in 2009, compared to 45% in 2008.“One of the most significant increases occurred in Eastern and Southern Africa, where the proportion jumped ten percentage points, from 58% in 2008 to 68% in 2009.”“We have strong evidence that elimination of mother-to-child transmission is achievable,” said Margaret Chan, director-general of the World Health Organisation. “Achieving the goal will require much better prevention among women and mothers in the first place.”Young women still shoulder the greater burden of HIV infection, and in many countries women face their greatest risk of infection before age 25. Worldwide, more than 60% of all young people living with HIV are female. In sub-Saharan Africa, that figure is nearly 70%.“We need to address gender inequalities, including those that place women and girls at disproportionate risk to HIV and other adverse sexual and reproductive health outcomes,” said Irina Bokova, director-general of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (Unesco).“While we are encouraged by a decline in HIV incidence among young people of more than 25% in 15 key countries in sub-Saharan Africa between 2001 and 2009, we must do everything possible to sustain and increase such positive trends in order to achieve universal access to prevention, treatment, care and support.”The report also emphasises the importance of tailoring education programmes to target the most vulnerable young people – those who are out of school – with information about HIV prevention.“We must increase investments in young people’s education and health, including sexual and reproductive health, to prevent HIV infections and advance social protection,” said Thoraya Ahmed Obaid, executive director of the UN Population Fund. “Reaching marginalised young people, including vulnerable adolescent girls and those who are not in school, must remain a priority.”SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Connecting small business to the world can help Africa thrive

first_imgAn M-Pesa agent in the Bunda region of Kenya. It is estimated that a third of the country’s US$44-billion annual economic output now flows through the innovative mobile money transfer service . (Image: Emil Sjöblom, Flickr)• Jarle HetlandMedia officerInternational Trade Centre+41 22 730-0145hetland@intracen.orgArancha GonzálezSub-Saharan Africa is a rare bright spot in a still-sluggish world economy, with the International Monetary Fund projecting 6% output growth this year. A decade of expansion has been driven by peace, better economic governance, investment and high commodity prices. But make no mistake: it has not just been about resources. Some of the best performing countries are not rich in natural resources, such as Rwanda, Ethiopia and Burkina Faso. Services such as retail and communications, together with agribusiness and manufacturing and exports, have driven growth more than is generally recognised. Business incubators and accelerators are spawning technology start-ups from Accra to Dar es Salaam.That said, Africa faces daunting challenges. The extractive sector propels growth in several countries but does not directly create many stable jobs. By 2050, the continent’s labour force will be bigger than that of China or India. Creating jobs for hundreds of millions of labour market entrants will mean the difference between a demographic dividend and a social time bomb. Africans don’t just need more jobs; they need better jobs. Prosperity hinges on getting people out of subsistence agriculture and marginal self-employment into more productive activities.Growth without diversification, technological improvement, and increased productivity is easily reversed: all it takes is a dip in commodity prices. This is where trade and small to medium enterprises, or SMEs, fit in. Trade demands competitiveness. Exporting firms are more productive, and pay higher wages than their domestically focused counterparts, especially in places like sub-Saharan Africa. If firms manage to thrive in world markets, they tend to increase their productivity even more.Turning mobile phones into banksJust take a look at the success story that is M-Pesa .The impending launch in Europe of this mobile money transfer service, which has transformed the way banking and business are done in East Africa, is more than a feel-good story about technology pioneered in one of the world’s poorest regions being imported to one of its richest.M-Pesa is a powerful example of the gains to be had when the development community works together creatively to empower people and businesses in developing countries. From a modest pilot project focused on microfinance repayments, M-Pesa – “pesa” means “money” in Kiswahili – has grown to the point that an estimated one-third of Kenya’s $44-billion annual economic output now flows through it. M-Pesa has turned mobile phones into both offices and banks.Responsive governments committed to improving the broader trade facilitation and business environment can help companies of all sizes by improving infrastructure: roads, transportation, ports, information and communication technology, and electricity. For enterprises to capitalise on opportunities to grow, they need access to finance. This can be difficult for SMEs that are too big for microfinance institutions but too small to interest commercial lenders.Meeting export markets’ health and quality standards, together with the dizzying array of private voluntary standards, is especially tough for smaller firms, although the rewards for compliance can be considerable. The recent World Trade Organisation agreement on trade facilitation should cut customs-related red tape which weighs heavily on SMEs, making it easier and cheaper to bring goods across borders.Internationalising small businessThe International Trade Centre works to internationalise SMEs in developing countries. Some of our work is with governments to improve policies and to strengthen their institutions in trade and export development. The rest of our work is with the private sector: creating free intelligence tools to help them learn about conditions in potential markets; assisting them to connect to value chains; helping with product branding; and tackling non-tariff measures.In our experience, modest, targeted interventions can yield substantial rewards. Facilitating contact (and contracts) between Southeast Asia and Western and Central Africa yielded over $150-million in deals for cashews, rice, and cotton in the space of a few years. Bringing experts from Bangladesh spinning mills to the Tanzania to train cotton farmers and gin operators on how to reduce contamination, led to higher prices for the farmers and better raw material for the mills. Connecting women in rural Burkina Faso to a rising star in Italian fashion meant more sales than ever for their traditional prints which helped Stella Jean’s high-end customers do some good while being fashionable.Watch: Stella Jean’s “ethical fashion” using prints from Burkina Faso:Governments, African business, foreign investors, and civil society groups have an opportunity to pool their ingenuity and their resources to find innovative new ways to strengthen the African private sector and help SMEs access capital and markets.The broader development community can support the private sector to improve productivity and generate jobs which can free people from unemployment or the drudgery of subsistence labour. Prioritising the private sector will require some development policy experimentation.Small risks, huge payoffsInternational investors, representatives of international and regional organisations, and African leaders from government and civil society, who attended the World Economic Forum on Africa in Abuja, Nigeria last month are seeking to translate the region’s economic promise and youthful demographics into employment opportunities and poverty reduction.A key subject at the Abuja summit was the bottlenecks that prevent existing and yet-to-be-founded firms in African countries from exporting value-added goods and services, and think about how best to encourage investment and hiring in modern, tradable sectors.The policy makers and policy takers at the Abuja meeting could take a lesson from M-Pesa’s success where small risks can have huge payoffs. They can think about how they can work together to help the continent’s biggest job creator: its immense ecosystem of micro, small and medium-sized enterprises. Empowering the African private sector to tap into value chains would bolster prospects for growth and job creation.Arancha González is the executive director of the International Trade Centre, Geneva. This article originally appeared on the World Economic Forum Blog.last_img read more

Virtual field trips add a new twist to an educational staple

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Pork Council is taking a new look at an old elementary school staple — field trips.There is certainly no shortage of school students interested in taking a field trip to a modern livestock farm but logistics, costs and biosecurity issues make this important educational tool and valuable agricultural outreach effort increasingly impractical. To address this challenge, the Ohio Pork Council has harnessed technology to develop a unique opportunity for teachers and students to participate in a live video-chat with farmers. Using Google Hangouts video chat technology, hog farmers can take students inside their barns and showcase the inner workings of modern production facilities and a variety of aspects of raising pigs from pregnancy through birth to market weight.“We’ve established a way to open up our hog barns in the state of Ohio and make a connection with folks who may not be able to get out to farms to see where their food comes from. Elementary school classrooms are able to connect live with a farmer virtually and see what goes on in his or her hog farm,” said Quinton Keeran, with the Ohio Pork Council. “We are now kicking off this year’s field trips and are hoping to expand this as far as we can. The program was very well received last year. We are planning to add more farmers and we want to broaden beyond elementary schools. We are going to open this up to high school classes, specifically FFA and vo-ag classes. We are also considering opening this opportunity to the general public.”Each virtual tour can be shaped by the teacher in the classroom to address the curriculum that is currently being covered.“This program is unique because we have worked with educators to specifically tailor our messaging to points in curriculum that teachers will be working on,” Keeran said. “We have had several teachers using this in different areas of the curriculum. Some teachers have used this for science, social studies, and economics. The teacher can take this experience and tailor it to the curriculum they are working on.”While the hog farmers are quite adept talking about their farms, there is some important training needed to get them up to speed on the technology required for the effort.“Our farmers are very good at what they do, but they may not always be carrying an I-pad and headphones. We had to work with some of the individual farmers that decided to be a part of this to train them on the technology to be able to really provide a nice positive experience for the students that participate in this live video chat,” Keeran said. “Right now we have three farmers participating. We have done some simulations and test runs of these Google Hangouts to try and figure out what equipment works best in their barns. We’ve provided them with some wireless capability to really be able to enhance the experience.”Farm Credit of Mid-America has been an important supporter of the project with the Ohio Pork Council.“We are very excited about the opportunity we have been given to enhance the virtual field trip program through support from Farm Credit Mid-America that will continue to grow that project and reach more classrooms within the state of Ohio,” Keeran said.One of the farmers participating in the virtual field trips is Neil Rhonemus who farms in Highland and Clinton counties and raises contract hogs for the Heimerl family.“We have two wean-to-finish barns. We get the pigs when they are 21 days old and 12 pounds and we take them to finish weight. They are all gilts,” Rhonemus said. “They are marketed by the Pig Improvement Company. We have shipped pigs all over the U.S. and Mexico and to China. We only have 60 acres of crops so we depend on our neighbors to use the manure from our barns.”One of the farmers participating in the virtual field trips is Neil Rhonemus who farms in Highland and Clinton counties and raises contract hogs.Rhonemus welcomes the opportunity to share his farm with students around Ohio.“Less than 2% of our population farms and less than 1% actually takes care of livestock. We need to get our story across to the general public so they know what we are doing before somebody makes it up for us,” he said. “So far I have talked to second and third graders and I am going to be talking to some FFA students — I expect a whole different set of questions from them. I explain that pork is meat we get from a hog. It is necessary for us to respect our animals and treat them humanely and, if we eat meat, it is also necessary that we raise animals. I was asked once where the baby pigs come from and I said, ‘They come on a trailer’ which is true. That is how I get them. You have to expect those kinds of questions will come up. Handling the questions from the kids is fun because you never know what to expect when they start talking. You really have to be on your toes. It has been a really good experience for me and I am looking forward to doing more.”He has found that the students are really interested in what is happening on the farm.“I’m never surprised about the lack of knowledge about what we do that is out there. I have been surprised about their curiosity, though. These students really want to know about what we do and they want to learn. It is awesome to be involved in,” he said. “One of our teachers was a neighbor not too far from one of our facilities and she initiated some really good questions. I really look forward to those questions from the adults as well. It is really cool and it is exciting to be involved with something like this.”Rhonemus said that there was a learning curve with the technology involved and the process is not as simple as just turning on an I-pad.“It wasn’t too bad really once we got the equipment working and got a feel for how things flow. I have an I-pad with headphones to cancel out the noise so I can hear and I have a portable receiver for our Internet,” he said. “Once we are connected we take a tour of the building to show them what is going on then I can field questions from the students. We have a moderator involved so there is a technician involved to handle the equipment. This is a coordinated effort from several people. “The effort, though, is viewed as worthwhile for everyone involved. The teachers have expressed appreciation for the chance to add a unique teaching tool in the classrooms and the students gain valuable insight into how their food is produced straight from the source that best knows the real answers to their questions — the farmer.The students always enjoy seeing baby pigs.last_img read more

Overhyped, Overpriced & Disappointing: iPad? No, iPod in 2001

first_img“I still can’t believe this! All this hype for something so ridiculous! … I want something new! I want them to think differently! Why oh why would they do this?! It’s so wrong! It’s so stupid!”Sound familiar? That wasn’t a reaction to yesterday’s Apple iPad launch, that was a MacRumors commenter in 2001 reacting to the launch of the iPod. The iPod, the device that symbolized personal electronics more than any other product in the last decade, was widely criticized when it was unveiled. It was “just another MP3 player.” One notable detail in comparing the history of the iPod with the new iPad: iPod sales were no big deal until three years after the product was launched. There was no iTunes for Windows until two years after the iPod came out – the iPad already has a thriving app store. (See this conversation on Hacker News for more snarky historical perspective.)Thus while these old comments about the iPod are humorous in retrospect, the history of the iPod is a reminder of just how much has to go right for even a revolutionary Apple product to really explode. There may be a lot of us who wait for the iPad 2.0.“I’d call it the Cube 2.0 as it wont sell, and be killed off in a short time… and it’s not really functional. Uuhh Steve, can I have a PDA now?” That’s what they said then. Will we look back in 10 years at today’s complaints about the iPad missing a camera and chuckle in the same way? Maybe not about the camera, but the missing Flash support? Now that might seem silly in retrospect. Tags:#humor#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts marshall kirkpatrickcenter_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

WWDC 2014: Apple By The Numbers

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#Apple#Statistics#Tim Cook#WWDC 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketcenter_img Related Posts It’s a year of milestones for Apple. This January marked the 30th anniversary of the Macintosh computer. Monday marked the first day of Apple’s 25th Worldwide Developers Conference.See also: Apple Celebrates 30 Years Of The Mac ComputerCEO Tim Cook kicked off the conference with a couple more impressive statistics from Apple, and peppered them throughout his keynote. Here’s our latest look at Apple by the numbers, courtesy of Cook:There are now 9 million registered developers on the Apple platform. What’s more, there are 50% more registered developers in 2014 then there were in 2013.The youngest Apple developer attending WWDC is 13 years old. Apple sold 80 million Macbooks last year. That means, Cook observed, that while the computer industry as a whole declined by 5%, Macs grew by 12%.Since OS Mavericks launched in October 2013, user adoption has risen to 51%. Cook used this moment to add a subtle dig in Microsoft’s direction; Windows 8, launched in October 2012, only has 14% adoption now. Of course, it’s worth pointing out that while Mavericks is free, Windows 8 is far from cheap.Apple has sold more than 800 million iDevices in its lifetime. That includes 100 million iPod Touches, 200 million iPads, and more than 500 million iPhones. The company is still accumulating new users. 130 million customers who bought an Apple device in the last twelve months were buying their first ever Apple product.iOS 7 had an 89% adoption rate for iPhone users, compared to 9% for Android’s KitKat. iOS7 also had a 97% satisfaction rate, according to Cook.98% of Fortune 500 companies use iOS, senior vice president of Software Engineering Craig Federighi said on stage at WWDC.There are 1.2 million apps available on the App Store, 300 million App Store visitors every week, and 75 billion apps downloaded, Cook said.Just 49% of people used a passcode before Touch ID. Now, on the iPhone 5s, 83% of people use Touch ID or a passcode.   The lastest version of Xcode, Apple’s suite of software development tools, was downloaded 14 million times.Screenshot via WWDC lauren orsinilast_img read more