Global investment in wind and solar doubles that in gas, nuclear, and coal

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Wall Street Journal:Global spending on renewable energy is outpacing investment in electricity from coal, natural gas and nuclear power plants, driven by falling costs of producing wind and solar power.More than half of the power-generating capacity added around the world in recent years has been in renewable sources such as wind and solar, according to the International Energy Agency.In 2016, the latest year for which data is available, about $297 billion was spent on renewables—more than twice the $143 billion spent on new nuclear, coal, gas and fuel oil power plants, according to the IEA. The Paris-based organization projects renewables will make up 56% of net generating capacity added through 2025.Once supported overwhelmingly by cash-back incentives, tax credits and other government incentives, wind- and solar-generation costs have fallen consistently for a decade, making renewable-power investment more competitive.Renewable costs have fallen so far in the past few years that “wind and solar now represent the lowest-cost option for generating electricity,” said Francis O’Sullivan, research director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Energy Initiative.Sustained government support in Europe and other developed economies spurred the development of renewable energy. But costs have fallen for other reasons. China invested heavily in a domestic solar-manufacturing industry, creating a glut of inexpensive solar panels. Innovation helped manufacturers build longer wind-turbine blades, creating machines able to generate substantially more power at a lower cost.Renewable-energy plants also face fewer challenges than traditional power plants. Nuclear-power plants have been troubled by mostly technical delays, while plants burning fossil fuels face regulatory uncertainties due to concerns about climate change. And pension funds, seeking long-term stable returns, have invested heavily in wind farms and solar parks, allowing developers to get cheaper financing.“It is just easier to get renewables built,” said Tony Clark, a former member of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. “There is that much less opposition to it.”More ($): Global Investment in Wind and Solar Energy Is Outshining Fossil Fuels Global investment in wind and solar doubles that in gas, nuclear, and coallast_img read more

Farah won’t rule out Olympic marathon bid

first_imgBut, now living in London after splitting from controversial coach Alberto Salazar, Farah is currently more concerned with winning the London Marathon. “For me it is the biggest marathon in the world, and it is going to be tough. Mo Farah ain’t going to turn up and win… it’s going to be hard to run,” he said.Quizzed on whether he had taught the Queen to do his famous ‘Mobot’ celebration, Farah laughed, saying it was “far too rude – not in Buckingham Palace”.Share on: WhatsApp Mo Farah receives knighthood from the Queen for services to athleticsLondon, United Kingdom | AFP | Britain’s Mo Farah says he could compete in the marathon at the 2020 Olympics if he feels confident of winning a medal.Farah retired from the track in August to focus on road racing and has been coy about his Olympic future.center_img The 34-year-old had previously hinted he might not race for Britain again, but Farah hasn’t completely ruled out the opportunity of going for gold in Tokyo.Speaking after receiving his knighthood from the Queen at Buckingham Palace on Tuesday, the four-time Olympic champion said: “If I’m capable of getting a medal or close to a medal (in Tokyo), you will see me.”He has been retained on British Athletics’ World Class Performance Programme despite doubts over his Olympic plans.last_img read more

McIlroy hints at US campaign in 2019 in pursuit of top spot

first_imgDubai, United Arab Emirates | AFP | Rory McIlroy dropped a bombshell Tuesday by hinting he could give up his European Tour membership in an effort to get back to the top of the world rankings next year.The world number seven plans to concentrate on playing in the United States, especially with the changes that have been made to the 2019 world golf schedule.Four-time major winner McIlroy is a three-time champion of the Tour’s Race to Dubai and has been a part of every European Ryder Cup team since 2010.Next year, the WGC-Mexico Championship will be played in February, the Players Championship has been advanced to March, the Masters in April, the PGA Championship has been moved to May and the US Open is in June.Which means there will be one big tournament every month across the Pacific until the British Open in July.“I am starting my year off in the States (at the Tournament of Champions) and that will be the big focus of mine up until the end of August and then we will assess it from there,” said the former world No1.“I think it is the result of the changes,” he explained ahead of the Tour’s season-ending DP World Tour Championship.“I don’t have to commit to anything until May, so I will not have played a European Tour event… I will play the WGCs and majors and events like that, but the true European Tour season does not start until July. “The way the schedule has worked for next year, it is going to be different for a lot of guys.“Everything is going to be so condensed between March and August, and that is why I am taking a big off-season to get myself ready, and then go at it hard from March all the way through to basically the end of the season.”The former world No1 has won the Arnold Palmer Invitational this year – his only title in the last two years – and he is eager to get back to the top echelon of the sport.“I’d maybe give it like a B-minus, and a win this week would get it up to a B,” said McIlroy about his season.“I don’t want to continue to dwell on the negatives. There’s been a lot of positives in there, as well. I’ve played very consistently. I’ve had 10 top-10s. I finished second and had a great chance to win The Open.“Obviously the game’s right there. It’s just a matter of doing it when I need to do it most.”He added: “Right now that is all sort of up in the air, but if it were to be that I don’t fulfil my membership next year, it’s not a Ryder Cup year so it’s not the end of the world.”McIlroy is ranked sixth in the Race to Dubai this week, which means even if he wins the tournament, he won’t be able to surmount front-runners Francesco Molinari and Tommy Fleetwood and secure a fourth European No1 crown.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more