SARS vaccine linked to liver damage in ferret study

first_imgDec 6, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – Researchers in Canada who found hepatitis in ferrets after injecting the animals with an experimental vaccine for SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) are urging caution as other investigators develop and test SARS vaccines.As reported in the November issue of the Journal of Virology, the study involved a vaccine developed by senior author Jingxin Cao, PhD, of the Public Health Agency of Canada’s National Microbiological Laboratory in Winnipeg, Man. Cao had created a vaccine from recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA) and the distinctive spike protein that marks the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The trial vaccine is called rMVA-S.The team chose ferrets for the study on the basis of their reported susceptibility to SARS infection, Cao told CIDRAP News.At the Canadian Science Centre for Human and Animal Health’s Biosafety Level 4 lab in Winnipeg, three ferrets were injected with the rMVA-S vaccine, three with parental MVA, and three with saline solution. They received booster immunizations 2 weeks later.Then the ferrets were exposed intranasally to the SARS virus, which infected more than 8,000 people and killed 774 between November 2002 and July 2003.On the plus side, immunization with rMVA-S induced a rapid immune response following exposure to the virus, the researchers wrote. The ferrets displayed no clinical signs of illness, but viral RNA was found in pharyngeal swabs and blood samples taken from all the ferrets.But researchers unexpectedly discovered a downside when they checked the ferrets’ liver health. Ferrets vaccinated with rMVA-S and exposed to SARS-CoV had elevated levels of an enzyme that indicates liver damage. Examination of liver sections showed that the ferrets had severe hepatitis. Only mild hepatitis was found in the ferrets injected with parental MVA or saline.It’s uncommon to perform the tests that revealed the hepatitis, said Kelly Keith, acting communications manager for the Canadian Science Centre for Human and Animal Health. This study will help ensure that any other SARS vaccine will be safer, as scientists should know to check for this possible side effect.”Extra caution should be taken in proposed human trials of SARS vaccines due to the potential liver damage from immunization and virus infection,” the research report states.Cao said he hopes that others recognize the significance of the hepatitis among the vaccinated ferrets. “For future human vaccine development, we must pay attention to that effect,” he said.The lead author of the study, Hana Weingartl, PhD, head of special pathogens for Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg, said she and her fellow researchers are seeking a grant to continue their work. “We would like to look more closely at why we saw the liver damage in those animals,” she said. “It would be good to know what not to do.”The findings underscore how little is understood about SARS, which emerged in southern China in November 2002. Since its discovery, scientists have raced to contain it and develop a vaccine. Weingartl and Cao’s study is one of several vaccine investigations in various stages in several countries.Researchers need a better understanding of how the virus damages the host, Weingartl said.In an unrelated SARS vaccine investigation, the Chinese government yesterday announced that a vaccine proved safe and effective in a phase 1 clinical trial. Thirty-six volunteers who had been vaccinated reported no unusual physical reactions after 56 days, Agence France-Presse reported (AFP). In addition, antibodies were found in 24 of those vaccinated, the story said.Testing began in May with 18 men and 18 women from 21 to 40 years old following what the government termed successful animal tests, AFP reported. The vaccine won’t be ready for commercial use until two more testing phases are completed.Weingartl H, Czub M, Czub S, et al. Immunization with modified vaccinia virus Ankara-based recombinant vaccine against severe acute respiratory syndrome is associated with enhanced hepatitis in ferrets. J Virology 2004;78(22):12672-6 [Abstract]last_img read more

Gerindra to reappoint Prabowo as chairman in extraordinary congress on Saturday

first_imgGerindra secretary-general Ahmad Muzani has said that the party is set to reappoint Prabowo Subianto as its chairman in the upcoming extraordinary congress, which is to be held at Prabowo’s residence in Hambalang, Bogor, West Java, on Saturday.”This is the result of the previous national leadership meeting, where 34 Regional Representatives Council [DPD] members asked for Prabowo’s willingness to lead the party [again] in the next five years,” Muzani said on Thursday evening, as quoted by tempo.co.The national leadership meeting, which was conducted on June 4, also resulted in a decision to hold the extraordinary meeting both offline and online amid the ongoing health crisis. Read also: PSI, Gerindra join PDI-P in backing Jokowi’s son for Surakarta mayoraltyThose attending the congress in person, however, would be asked to undergo a swab test first to make sure they were free from the coronavirus, Muzani said, adding that they were also required to comply with health protocol during the meeting by wearing face masks and keeping a distance from one another. “We’d like to thank the Health Ministry for facilitating the swab testing for the congress participants,” he said.In addition to appointing the party’s chairman for the 2020-2025 term, the congress will also have Prabowo deliver the accountability report of the party’s central executive board.Prabowo, who is also the defense minister, has led Gerindra since 2014, replacing then-chairman Suhardi, who passed away in August 2014. (vny)Topics :last_img read more

Authors announced for the ‘LA Times’ Festival

first_imgIn preparation for the 19th annual Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, the L.A. Times announced Tuesday the names of hundreds of the event’s participants.The Festival of Books will be held April 12 and 13 on the USC campus for the fourth year, taking over theaters, classrooms and outdoor spaces for a variety of panels, signings, performances and demonstrations.A variety of authors, artists and celebrities are slated to attend the festival, though a schedule will not be announced until March 17, when festival passes go on sale. Individual tickets to events will be available starting April 6.Many USC faculty members, including Aimee Bender, T.C. Boyle, Josh Kun and Varun Soni, are scheduled to appear. USC student performers include Saved by Grace, SoCal Vocals and the Trojan Marching Band.Among the authors scheduled to attend are young adult favorites Laurie Halse Anderson, John Green and Veronica Roth; critical darlings Stephen Chbosky and Sandra Cisneros, and actors-turned-novelists B.J. Novak, Alicia Silverstone and Henry Winkler. Daniel Handler, the man behind A Series of Unfortunate Events, is also slated to attend, following his popular appearance last year.The weekend will begin with the 34th annual L.A. Times Book Prizes ceremony on April 11 in Bovard Auditorium. During the ceremony, John Green will be presented with the 2013 Innovator’s Award and Susan Straight will receive the 2013 Robert Kirsch Award.Green’s best-selling novels have received numerous awards. The author has been experimenting with social media and technology to expand how people in and out of the literary world use the mediums to inspire and teach. According to the L.A. Times Festival of Books’ website, the Innovator’s Award “spotlights cutting-edge business models, technology or applications of narrative art.”The Robert Kirsch Award recognizes a body of work by a writer living in or writing about the American West. Straight is a Riverside, Calif. native.The best books of 2013 will also be recognized at the L.A. Times Book Prizes event. Best books will be selected in each of the 10 categories.The Festival of Books is one of the largest literary festivals in the country. It generally brings more than 150,000 attendees to the event hosted at USC, according to the L.A. Times.last_img read more