Alumni develop app to increase access, convenience of medical care

first_imgTwo USC alumni developed the app Heal with the intent of making health care more convenient.Launched in 2014, Heal was founded by Renee Dua and Greg Drobnick. Their goal was to utilize locational technology to deliver medical specialists to customers.Urgently caring · Renee Dua (right), founder of Heal, thought of the app after her son had to wait eight hours before being attended to. | Photo courtesy of Alexandra TroyDua, the chief medical officer at Heal, participated in a fellowship at USC in 2003, with a focus on nephrology, the study of kidneys and hypertension. She also co-founded the application with her husband, and Drobnick, a USC graduate, later joined Heal as its external vice president of strategic initiatives.As former students, the two recognized the lack of access to medical resources for students, and Dua aimed to set Heal apart from other medical options through availability and convenience in its services.“Student health services [aren’t] necessarily open on nights or weekends [at suitable hours],” Dua said. “[Heal is] open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.”Currently available in populated areas of California, including Los Angeles County, Long Beach, Orange County, San Diego and the San Francisco Bay Area, Heal was envisioned to be a new system for health care, Dua said, with doctors available 365 days a year.“It is the house call,” Dua said. “A patient can use an app to schedule a visit with a doctor as his or her personal location. It’s an essential change in the delivery of health care. Usually, you need to go to the doctor. What we’re doing is making that different. The doctor comes to you.”The original idea behind Heal came from Dua, after she experienced a scare with her son’s pediatrician, who told her to rush her toddler to the emergency room after he developed a rash. Dua was told her son would be fine,  but only after an eight-hour wait.The increasing wait times to see doctors, Drobnick said, creates a need for services like Heal. Doctor wait times in 15 metropolitan markets are an average of 24 days in length, a 30 percent increase from 2014, according to a study by Merritt Hawkins.“At the push of a button, you can have an excellent doctor at your dorm, your sorority or fraternity house, your apartment — wherever it is you are,” Drobnick said. “Our promise to students is that we will arrive in under two hours.” As goods and services are increasingly delivered, Drobnick recognized Heal as an innovative use of technology in a field that desperately needs it. “We set out to create a service that would help streamline a lot and use great technologies … to make that process of seeing a doctor easier,” Drobnick said. Drobnick also highlighted the utility of Heal for out-of-state or international students.“The most important thing is that [students] need access to health care just like everybody else does, and you can use [Heal] to see a doctor for almost any reason, [except emergencies],” Dua said.last_img read more

Byron Scott: Lakers guard Nick Young is ‘not having a good year’

first_imgMEMPHIS, Tenn. >> As Nick Young strolled down a hallway near the entrance tunnel, an arena security official told the Lakers forward something that made his eyes light up like a Christmas tree.“You’re the next Kobe (Bryant)”, the security official said. But no matter how much he smiles and offers entertaining quotes, Young cannot camouflage an uncomfortable reality. Young remains on pace to finish with his worst season of his eight-year NBA career, hardly what the Lakers envisioned when they signed him last summer to a four-year, $21.5 million deal. He has averaged 13.4 points on a career-low 36.6 shooting percent clip, a mark that dipped in January (32.2 percent) and February (32.4 percent). “He’s not having a good year,” Lakers coach Byron Scott said of Young. “He’d be the first to admit that this hasn’t been the year he expected.” Young reported that trend caused plenty of Lakers fans to call him “Swagless P” on Twitter, an obvious insult to his self-given nickname “Swaggy P.”“It’s like basketball is my girlfriend and she is mad at me,” said Young, who averaged a team-leading 17.9 points on a 44 percent clip last season under Mike D’Antoni. “I came to the house too late. She kicked me out. Then I fell down the stairs and hurt my leg.”Young actually does hurt. He sat out of Friday’s contest against the Memphis Grizzlies at FedEx Forum, marking the sixth consecutive game he’s missed because of continued swelling in his left knee.“It’s getting better,” said Young, who plans to work out on Saturday for the first time since suffering the injury 1 1/2 weeks ago. “Hopefully I’ll return sometime this week.”Will Young improve his shooting then? Scott, who shot 48.2 percent in his 14-NBA career, including 11 with the Lakers, admitted feeling “surprised” about Young’s struggles. Scott observed Young has lacked both confidence and great shot selection. “He has to do a better job moving without the ball. It can’t be catch, then 18 dribbles and then he gets a shot,” Scott said. “When he does it that way, there’s one of two things. It’s a home run or a strikeout.”A reporter joked Babe Ruth thrived under those circumstances. “Babe Ruth was probably one of the best players in baseball history,” Scott said. “Nick thinks he’s up there with Reggie Miller and Larry Bird from a shooting standpoint. But if you look at their shooting percentage and you look at his, he’s not there.”The difference in shooting percentages between Young (42.3), Miller (47.1) and Bird (49.6) are striking. When informed about Scott’s criticism, Young joked, “I got no take. That’s the coach.” Young then turned serious.“I’ll always have confidence. It’s just my first time I’ve been on a stage like this and having a funk,” Young said. “The more I hear about missing shots, the more I’m trying to get back into it too quickly. I just got to let it come to me more.”center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Doctors remove arrow from tribal womans stomach in MP

first_imgIndore, Jun 20 (PTI) Doctors today successfully removed an arrow, which got stuck in a 40-year-old tribal womans abdomen, after she was shot by her husband.A 10-member team led by doctor Arvind Ghanghoria of Government M Y Hospital successfully removed the arrow from Manus abdomen.”Manu was brought to the hospital from Alirajpur district last night after her husband shot an arrow which hit her in the stomach and got stuck there. She was initially admitted to a district hospital there,” Ghanghoria said.After nearly four hours of surgery, the arrow was successfully removed from her stomach, the doctor said, adding her condition is critical but out of danger. PTI HWP MAS LAL NRB NSDlast_img