Ben & Jerry’s Bonnaroo Buzz ice cream goes on national tour

first_imgBen & Jerry’s Homemade, Inc,As the promoters of one of the world’s biggest, modern day rock and roll concert event unleashed their powerhouse 2011 line up today, there was one act guaranteed to go back to the show in Tennessee in a bigger and bolder way: Ben & Jerry’s Bonnaroo Buzz ice cream. The flavor, which was available only in Scoop Shops in 2010, is set to make its national debut on the main stage of frozen foods freezers across the country as Ben & Jerry’s has selected it to be one of its prestigious pint flavors for 2011.‘Bonnaroo Buzz is going from playing intimate clubs to the national circuit,’ said Marketing Director Dave Stever about the flavor made with Fair Trade Certified coffee. Since Ben & Jerry’s uses Fair Trade coffee from the Huatusco cooperative in Mexico the ice cream maker felt loyal fans of the flavor would be able to celebrate their love of delicious swirls, chunks, and rock ‘n roll while knowing that their flavor is doing good for the world. ‘Our Scoop Shops will continue to feature the flavor, but now there is more ‘Roo for everyone with its release in pints across the U.S.A.,’ added Stever.Ben & Jerry’s has long been known for melding melodious flavors into its ice cream line up, including best-sellers Cherry Garcia and Phish Food. In 2010 Ben & Jerry’s unveiled its first festival-themed flavor to date, Bonnaroo Buzz. The flavor was created in partnership with the Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival, dubbed one of ‘50 moments that changed the history of Rock & Roll’ by Rolling Stone magazine.Bonnaroo Buzz is a sweet concoction of light coffee and malt ice creams with a whiskey caramel swirl and English toffee pieces. The flavor was first introduced at an invite-only event at the legendary Bowery Ballroom in New York City. The flavor debut party featured Latin funk rap band, culture mashers Ozomatli. The band, a perennial Bonnaroo performer, was a perfect initiation for the Ben & Jerry’s launch as it represented the eclectic, broad-range of top musical acts that are featured at the music festival in Coffee County, Tennessee.The festival’s location additionally served as inspiration for Ben & Jerry’s flavor developer Eric Fredette. ‘It’s Coffee County, so it only made sense to add a cool coffee base to this flavor,’ said Fredette. And the unique caramel-whisky** swirl? ‘Well, it is Tennessee,’ said Fredette, ‘and we thought Bonnaroo fans would appreciate it.’ Coffee County, Tennessee also benefits as well as Bonnaroo donates its shares of the proceeds from the ice cream flavor to the Bonnaroo Works Fund, which seeks to further the organization’s community investment and philanthropic efforts. Rock on.For more information on Ben & Jerry’s or to find your local Scoop Shop, visit www.benjerry.com(link is external).About Ben & Jerry’sBen & Jerry’s produces a wide variety of super-premium ice cream and ice cream novelties, using high-quality ingredients including milk and cream from family farmers who do not treat their cows with the synthetic hormone rBGH. The company states its position on rBGH* on its labels. Ben and Jerry’s products are distributed nationwide and in selected foreign countries in supermarkets, grocery stores, convenience stores, franchise Ben & Jerry’s Scoop Shops, restaurants and other venues. Ben & Jerry’s, a Vermont corporation and wholly-owned subsidiary of Unilever, operates its business on a three-part Mission Statement emphasizing product quality, economic reward and a commitment to the community. Contributions made via the employee led Ben & Jerry’s Foundation in 2009 totaled over $1.7 million. Additionally, the company makes significant product donations to community groups and nonprofits both in Vermont and across the nation. The purpose of Ben & Jerry’s philanthropy is to support the founding values of the company: economic and social justice, environmental restoration and peace through understanding, and to support our Vermont communities. For the full scoop on all Ben & Jerry’s Scoop Shop locations and fabulous flavors, visit www.benjerry.com(link is external).* The FDA has said no significant difference has been shown and no test can now distinguish between milk from rBGH treated cows and untreated cows. Not all the suppliers of our other ingredients can promise that the milk they use comes from untreated cows.** The whisky used in the caramel swirl has had the alcohol cooked out so the buzz from Bonnaroo Buzz is a not an alcohol buzz. BURLINGTON, Vt.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–last_img read more

Catherine Byrne: Palliative care a kindly end-of-life right

first_imgNZ Herald 24 June 2017Family First Comment: From a palliative care specialist who knows…“All the genuine and compassionate reasons people have for being in favour of euthanasia can be met by good palliative care and that removes the obligation for doctors – till now only concerned with enhancing life – to instead be responsible for killing people.”www.rejectassistedsuicide.org.nz• Dr Catherine Byrne is a Tauranga GP who has worked at Waipuna Hospice for 15 years. She is married and has four children. The June 10 Weekend Herald published an article by Matt Vickers, husband of Lecretia Seales, who died last year, shortly before the Health Select Committee set up an inquiry to investigate the issue of assisted dying.The article was headed by a big, beautiful and evocative photograph of the pair on their wedding day.For reasons of privacy it is not possible to publish pictures of the many people who have been helped by the care and attention they have received at Waipuna Hospice, but as a doctor who has worked there for many years, I felt I could not let this article go past without pointing out that euthanasia is not the only answer to the serious concerns people have about the end of life, nor is it the most compassionate.Death, even from cancer or other frightening diseases, does not have to be “lonely, violent and concealed from family”, nor does it have to be “excruciatingly painful”, as Governor Jerry Brown fears. The whole point of the hospice movement is to prevent those very things, by excellent medical care and by warm, compassionate psychological and social support.There is no need to legislate for euthanasia to initiate “frank and honest conversations about death” – we have these conversations every day with people at the hospice. As Vickers points out, having those conversations brings comfort and relief to people previously afraid to articulate their fears.There is no need for anyone who receives good palliative care to die in excruciating pain; nor to die with loss of autonomy or dignity. Palliative care practitioners, from nurses and doctors to cooks and cleaners, spend their whole working lives doing everything they can to prevent any suffering at the end of life, and most people who have had contact with a hospice would support that statement. The way forward with difficult deaths should be to encourage the Government to ensure every single New Zealander who needs it has access to ever-better palliative care services.Opponents of euthanasia are not “religious zealots”, primarily concerned with “vulnerable, passive victims”. They are people who care about the value of all lives, including the disabled, the mentally ill, the very young, the very old and, most of all, the very sick.Based on my own experience, the people who ask for euthanasia are not those who are in an agony of pain – that has been dealt with by good medicine. They are articulate, intelligent men and women who fear they will be a financial and emotional burden to their family and friends.The Oregon data, which Vickers quotes, shows that 61 per cent of people requesting euthanasia stated “being a burden” as their main reason for doing so. At the moment, they cannot kill themselves legally, but if they could no amount of “protective legislation” would be able to prevent them. As it is we are able to help them physically and emotionally and allow them to reach a place where they see how precious the time they all have left together can be to their family and to themselves.Vickers states how delighted Lecretia would have been to see David Seymour’s End of Life Choice Bill drawn from the ballot. This bill requests legalised euthanasia not just for those dying from a terminal illness but for anyone with “a grievous and irremediable condition who experiences unbearable suffering that cannot be relieved in a manner they consider tolerable”. This would cover just about anything from cancer to severe arthritis.With such weak criteria, anyone suffering from anything would be entitled to take their case to the Court of Human Rights to say they were being discriminated against if they were NOT allowed to be considered for assisted suicide. In Oregon in 2013, 17 per cent of those completing euthanasia did not have a terminal illness at all but suffered from chronic disease such as diabetes and depression. In Belgium the percentage of deaths due to euthanasia is rising by 15 per cent every year and already constitutes 2 per cent of all deaths – and legislation there now allows euthanasia for babies and young children as well as consenting adults.READ MORE: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?objectid=11880452&ref=twitterKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more