Kirk Herbstreit’s Thoughts On The AP Preseason Top 25

first_imgKirk Herbstreit talking on ESPN.ESPN’s top college football analyst has shared his thoughts on the AP preseason top 25.Kirk Herbstreit appeared on ESPN’s SportsCenter this morning to discuss the release of the AP preseason top 25 poll, which you can see here.Here are Herbstreit’s thoughts on the poll:He’s not really surprised with the top five.“I think the one thing that stands out right away is that of the four teams that made the playoff, three are right back up there in the Top 3. I think it tells you a lot of times you’re voting by what happened last season and you’re trying to guess. Keep in mind we haven’t seen any of these teams yet and we’re speculating.”Ohio State at No. 6 might “raise some eyebrows.”“You’re trying to put together a team that can be competitive without knowing anything really. There’s nothing really shocking to me with the Top 5, but Ohio State up at 6 might raise so eyebrows for a lot people because of the losses.”There is parity.“This will be one of those years where there’s a lot of parity and it’ll come down to who’s healthy and who makes the most of their personnel. I don’t think the committee has it in them after 15 weeks of football to vote two teams from one conference. Even if they think they’re in the top four, I don’t see them ever doing that. They’ll be worried about feedback. This might be a year that it might be a valid point, but I don’t think he committee will ever put two teams from one conference in.”A College Football Playoff crasher? Houston. Or Boise State“Houston’s a pick that everybody seems to want to talk about because of last year and I understand that.Greg Ward and that offense is going to score. But if I’m looking at all these teams in (the Group of 5), I’d go with Boise State. They’ll be favored in most of their games after Washington State. Boise State can potentially ruffle some feathers if they beat the Cougs in Week 2.”Who are you picking to win it all this year?last_img read more

CM holds roadshow in North West Delhi for Gugan Singh

first_imgNEW DELHI: Chief Minister and AAP national convenor Arvind Kejriwal on Wednesday held roadshow at the North West Delhi constituency for party candidate Gugan Singh, and the party also released Manifesto for West Delhi, North East and New Delhi. This was the last roadshow by the AAP chief in Delhi for this Lok Sabha election. The road gained support at every point with hundreds of people standing at the road greeting the Chief Minister with garlands and flowers. Also Read – Odd-Even: CM seeks transport dept’s views on exemption to women, two wheelers, CNG vehiclesThe voice everywhere throughout the roadshow was for the full-statehood and the works for the Delhi government. The leaders stood in a Gipsy and the volunteers walked the street. After this roadshow, opposition leaders like Mamata Banerjee might join the campaign in support of the AAP. In the roadshow at some points, the Chief Minister addressed the people. “Do not let your vote to get divided therefore do not vote for the Congress party,” said the CM. Also Read – More good air days in Delhi due to Centre’s steps: JavadekarMeanwhile, AAP released its Manifesto for West-Delhi parliamentary constituency. “Manifesto for West-Delhi is compiled after discussion with people of Urban and Rural population, youngsters, women, environment lovers, people from Delhi-Dehaat and taking inputs from voters of unauthorized colonies, though we have common manifesto, Aam Aadmi Party is committed to working for local people, so our candidates are going to people with a vision for them,” said AAP’s chief spokesperson Saurabh Bharadwaj. Balbir Singh Jakhar, Party Candidate from West Delhi, said that we have set an area specific program for working on issues which are vital for West Delhi raised by people during election campaign which include, “setting up of New Institutions to ease admission for school pass-outs students, development of skill Centers to impart job oriented training to youngsters, development of multi-level parking lots to decongest west-Delhi roads, Elevated Road on Najafgarh Drain from Kakrola up to Meera Bagh to reduce traffic.”last_img read more

Julio Jones Is the Best

T.Y. HiltonIND2525623844167.8 Doug BaldwinSEA487321627167.4 Weighted overall rank comparison of wide receivers, 2014-16 Allen RobinsonJAC242083684165.1 RECEIVERTEAMTARGET FREQ.AVG. DEPTHCATCH RATERUN BLOCKAFTER CATCHWEIGHTED SUM Antonio BrownPIT457151944105.2 Emmanuel SandersDEN1423413175130.1 Odell BeckhamNYG751371517115.5 Steve SmithBAL1064345333166.3 Julio JonesATL240302728103.0 Rishard MatthewsTEN2936332056143.5 Larry FitzgeraldARI208214164142.9 DeAndre HopkinsHOU122769390139.1 Demaryius ThomasDEN35949432123.9 RANK Jordy NelsonGB1942292241128.5 Jarvis LandryMIA896111612135.6 Eric DeckerNYJ224645583149.0 Brandon MarshallNYJ183572980161.7 Mike EvansTB6681796126.0 Rankings are out of the 98 wide receivers with a minimum of 500 receiving yards in 2016 or 900 yards from 2014 to 2016.Sources: ESPN Stats & Information Group, ProFootballFocus.com Willie SneadNO398018225164.5 Let’s get this out of the way at the top: Julio Jones was the best receiver in football this season. Just about any way you slice it, whether using traditional stats,1Yards per game, for instance. advanced metrics2Like FootballOutsiders.com’s defense-adjusted yards above replacement. or even play-by-play grades,3Such as the ones compiled by ProFootballFocus.com. Jones was the receiver who kept defensive coordinators up at night worrying about all the havoc he could wreak. His explosiveness and diversity of skills enabled offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan to build the one of the best offenses in NFL history.But what makes Jones so good?At the most basic level, Jones dominates because of an unmatched combination of size and speed. Posting a 4.34-second 40-yard-dash before he was drafted, Jones ran the ninth-fastest combine time of any wideout who had at least 400 receiving yards in the 2016 season.4One limitation to this approach is that combine data is a snapshot of speed at age 21 or so. Needless to say, that number is probably a tad outdated for an NFL veteran like, say, 37-year-old Steve Smith Sr. Still, for most players, combine times give a decent approximation of their pure speed. All of the faster receivers are also smaller — nearly 5 inches shorter than the 6-foot-3 Jones, on average. While Jones was one of the fastest at the position regardless of height, most NFL wide receivers as tall as Jones ran the 40 slower than the overall position average of 4.47 seconds. A.J. GreenCIN531312961109.4 Wideouts that big and that fast are very difficult to cover. Think of Randy Moss (who, at 6-foot-4, ran an “unofficial” 4.25 second 40 in 1998) or, more recently, the two unrelated Johnsons, Andre (6-foot-2, 4.40) and Calvin (6-foot-5, 4.35), who used that formula to dominate the league’s receiving leaderboard in recent years. Moss in particular showed that a receiver who can stretch the field in all directions with speed, and then pluck balls from over defenders’ heads, can make an offense run far more efficiently than its individual components suggest it should.But Jones’s dominance is more than just a product of “big guy runs fast.” Since he returned from a foot fracture that cost him most of the 2013 season, no receiver has put those gifts to better on-field use than Jones — across every aspect of the position, from the flashy to the technical.We can measure how good Jones has been by breaking down what makes a great all-around receiver:The guy has to get open, so we’ll look at how often the ball comes his way (targets) as a percentage of his routes run.Ideally, receivers can go deep, so we’ll look at how far the ball travels before it gets to him (air yards per target).Then he still has to catch the darn ball, so we’ll look at his catch rate. (Air yards and catch rate are usually at odds with each other,5In my sample of top receivers from 2014 to 2016, the correlation between those two metrics was -0.7. since it’s harder to catch deep throws than short ones.)Once he’s open, has run a long ways and has caught the pass, it’d be nice if he could keep running without being tackled. So let’s also look at yards after the catch per reception.Oh, and one more thing — being a receiver isn’t all about receiving, so let’s look at blocking ability by using ProFootballFocus.com’s run-blocking grades.If we rank every active receiver6With a minimum of either 500 receiving yards in 2016 or 900 total yards from 2014 to 2016. in those categories over the past three seasons and add up the ranks (with some weighting based on the relative importance of each category7Specifically, the ranks for air yards per target and catch rate were assigned no special weight; targets per route was given 50 percent extra weight; yards after the catch was given 75 percent less weight; and run blocking was given 15 percent less weight. These weights were determined by regressing the first four categories against adjusted catch yards per route, an overall measure of receiving effectiveness, and running a separate regression against PFF’s “overall” grade to determine the relative value of blocking.), Jones rates as the most complete wide receiver in the NFL. Among the 98 receivers in our sample, he ranks 40th or better in every area of the game — the only receiver in the league who can make that claim.8Green Bay’s Jordy Nelson ranks in the top 42 in each category. Alshon JefferyCHI173268942143.7 Jones’s impressive combination of size and speed shows up most notably in his ability to get free of defenders — Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan targeted Jones on 30 percent of the routes he ran, the second most of any receiver (behind Kansas City’s Tyreek Hill at 31.5 percent) — as well as in his rare talent for keeping his catch rate up even as he goes deep. Based on the length of Jones’s average target — 11.9 yards beyond the line of scrimmage — we’d expect him to have caught only about 60 percent of the balls thrown in his direction; instead, he caught nearly 66 percent, a difference that amounts to 26 extra catches, many of the big-play variety. (Jones has 20 total receiving touchdowns over the past three seasons.) In other words, Jones mixes the reliability of a possession receiver with the big-play potential of a deep threat.And once he catches the ball, he’s frequently off to the races:So what hope do the New England Patriots — specifically, their defensive coordinator, Matt Patricia — have of containing Jones on Super Sunday?For their part, the Patriots had the NFL’s 10th-worst pass defense during the regular season and the 13th-worst D against No. 1 receivers like Jones. But they also boast two of the 12 highest-rated cover cornerbacks in football (according to PFF) in Malcolm Butler and Logan Ryan, plus Devin McCourty, PFF’s top-rated coverage safety. And in the playoffs, they’ve also held both Antonio Brown (No. 2 in our receiver rankings above) and DeAndre Hopkins (No. 10) to relatively tame performances.In Jones and Atlanta’s high-powered offensive “buzzsaw,” however, the Pats face their toughest challenge yet. The Falcons have had a startling offensive breakout this season: They easily led the league in expected points added (EPA) through the air — and offensive EPA in general — during the regular season, QB Matt Ryan enjoyed one of the most efficient passing seasons in league history, and the offense has only improved in the playoffs.9During the regular season, Atlanta averaged 11.5 more offensive EPA per game than an average team, 9.0 of which came in the passing game. After adjusting for the defenses they faced, the Falcons are averaging 21.5 offensive EPA above average in the playoffs, 20.9 of which have come via the pass.At the center of that offense is Jones. “Nobody can stop us but us,” Jones told reporters after the NFC title game. Whether that’s true or not will largely depend on whether New England can slow down the game’s most uncoverable receiver. Based on Jones’s performance these past few seasons, that’s a pretty tall (and fast) order. read more

Big Ten Tournament forecast foggy with a chance of upsets

Grant FrekingLantern reporterfreking.4@osu.edu 1. The tournament is Ohio State’s to lose. Sure, Michigan State is a deeper team and Wisconsin is a popular sleeper pick, but OSU has the ultimate trump card in Evan Turner. The likely Big Ten and National Player of the Year is capable of taking over and dominating any of the teams in the bracket. The Buckeyes’ only concern is depth, since coach Thad Matta rarely plays more than one or two guys off the bench.2. Illinois-Wisconsin will produce a surprise winner. Illinois shot itself in the foot to end the regular season, dropping five of its last six to put its NCAA Tournament hopes squarely on the bubble. However, they have a poor man’s Evan Turner in guard and fellow St. Joseph product Demetri McCamey, who is capable of breaking down opposing defenses like his high school teammate. A win over Wisconsin could be enough for the Fighting Illini to sneak into the NCAA Tournament.3. Purdue could falter in the quarterfinals. Now that star forward Robbie Hummel is out for the season, the Boilermakers’ front-court depth is questionable. If JaJuan Johnson gets into foul trouble, Purdue becomes a below-average offensive team and is very capable of being beaten by either Indiana or Northwestern.4. The Big Ten failed to live up to the hype this season. The conference sent seven teams to the NCAA Tournament last season and national pundits predicted that as many as eight teams would make it this season. However, Michigan and Minnesota struggled with inconsistency and were colossal disappointments. Moreover, Northwestern, hoping to gain a bid to the tournament for the first time in school history, had their hopes extinguished in November when the team’s leading scorer, Kevin Coble, broke his foot and opted for season-ending surgery. 5. Ohio State will prevail over Michigan State in the Big Ten Tournament finale. Evan Turner will begin his postseason crusade by shredding the Spartan defense and putting the Buckeyes up early, similar to what happened when OSU visited East Lansing last month. The Buckeyes will hold off Sparty, and depending on Duke’s ACC Tournament success, may secure a No. 1 seed. Zack MeiselSports editormeisel.14@osu.edu 1. People should stop sleeping on the Wisconsin Badgers. Bo Ryan’s crew finished just one game behind the Big Ten champion trio of Ohio State, Michigan State and Purdue. The Badgers won their final four regular season games by an average of 20.3 points per contest. Plus, Wisconsin recently welcomed forward Jon Leuer back from injury. The 6-foot-10-inch junior promptly responded by winning the Big Ten Player of the Week award last week.2. The first round should be a snooze-fest. Don’t expect lowly Indiana to give Northwestern trouble. To prevent its bubble from being burst, expect Minnesota to fend off Penn State. And whoever wins the Michigan-Iowa matchup will only matter for another 24 hours before losing to Ohio State. The hard-fought, intense games won’t begin until the quarterfinals on Friday.3. The NCAA Tournament committee will be praying that a Cinderella isn’t still alive come 3:30  Sunday. Should Michigan, Penn State or Northwestern sneak into the tournament final, the committee will be sweating it out. Since the Big Ten Championship game is the last one to take place, the NCAA Tournament bracket is usually mapped out before the game’s conclusion. A team hovering around mediocrity could throw a wrench into the committee’s plans by advancing on to Sunday.4. No Big Ten team will receive a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament. However, at least two will receive No. 2 seeds. Unless Duke falters very early in the ACC Tournament, the final No. 1 seed will belong to Coach K’s Blue Devils. The winner of the Big Ten Tournament will likely receive a No. 2 seed, as long as the winner is Ohio State, Purdue or Michigan State. If any of those teams reach the tournament final, that squad should also earn a No. 2. 5. Michigan State will top Ohio State for the Big Ten Tournament title. The Spartans peaked in March last season, when they surprised everyone outside of East Lansing by reaching the NCAA Championship game. Their depth could give OSU trouble, since the Buckeyes rarely play more than six players. Joshua A. DavidsonLantern reporterdavidson.252@osu.edu 1. If there is such a thing as a sleeper in the conference tournament, Michigan is it. The Maize and Blue are led by Manny Harris and DeShawn Sims, two of the most talented players in the Big Ten. After being a top 15 team in the preseason, Michigan has severely underachieved. However, a conference tournament championship still provides the Wolverines with a berth in the NCAA Tournament, which is plenty of motivation for their two-star upperclassmen.2. The most intriguing game in this year’s tournament is probably the quarterfinal matchup between Wisconsin and Illinois. The Fighting Illini will be battling for an NCAA berth and another quality win over Wisconsin could lock up an at-large bid. However, Bo Ryan’s Badgers are a tough out in the Big Ten Tournament and are playing to improve their own seed come Selection Sunday. The border rivals split their regular season games, both teams winning on the road.3. Look for Michigan State’s Raymar Morgan to be the tournament’s Most Outstanding Player. The forward possesses tremendous talent but has been inconsistent throughout his career. But now, as a senior, this is Morgan’s last chance at Spartan immortality and he’s playing like it. Morgan scored a season-high 22 points on senior night in East Lansing, Mich., for the Spartans’ last game. Also MSU needs to replace the scoring of suspended guard Chris Allen. Look for Morgan to pick up the slack.4. Curse of the No. 1 seed: of the 12 previous Big Ten Tournaments, the top seed has only won four times. Fans of top-seeded Ohio State shouldn’t expect to be dancing on the court at Conseco Fieldhouse come Sunday. However, if the Buckeyes do claim the tournament championship, they look to be destined for greatness in the NCAA Tournament. Three of the four No. 1 seeds who did win the conference tournament advanced to the Final Four. 5. Even with Chris Allen suspended, Michigan State has the talent and depth to win the Big Ten Tournament. Tom Izzo’s teams are built for tournament play, as can be seen by his five Final Four appearances. The Spartans will defeat Wisconsin on Sunday to claim their third conference tournament championship. In turn, MSU will lock up a No. 2 seed in the NCAA Tournament. read more

Higgs Robinson fire back at Bight MP

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTurks and Caicos, May 2, 2017 – Providenciales – The Tourism Minister is responding to what he calls the blistering attack on his reputation by Bight Member of Parliament, Porsha Smith  adding that he encourages the Integrity Commission to go ahead and expeditiously, with its investigation so that he can be firmly vindicated.   Smith last week questioned figures presented by and the integrity of Ralph Higgs, the member for North and Middle Caicos and Tourism Minister on the coming promenade and craft market for that island, which as she put it will hug his family owned development – Silver Bay Hotel – and which she says will cause him to be enriched from the public purse.Higgs labeled the move by Porsha Smith as reckless and unfortunate and said he will not be resigning his post, as she demanded on the steps of the Provo offices of the Integrity Commission.  Premier Sharlene Robinson is weighing in also, saying the project is a Change Document promose for the people of North and Middle Caicos and said the move by former tourism minister, Smith is a cheap shot.As the investment and finance minister, the Premier said the project did not get the green light because Ralph Higgs’ family but because she believes, “this area is unique and offers a beautiful tourist experience as it offers a beautiful stretch of natural beauty and is a source of pride for those on the Creek.”It is with the Finance Minister’s and hot the Tourism minister’s portfolio that capital projects are considered and approved and Premier Robinson said she stands by the Cabinet’s decision to approve the project.  Premier Robinson pointed to what she believes is the true motive for a public announcement before filing the case at the Integrity Commission by the MP for the Bight, “Her grandstanding in front of the Commission’s Office was also an ill-fated effort to defame the character of an individual whom the MP for the Bight worked closely with as former Minister of Tourism while in his role as Director of Tourist Board and whom she publicly stated in the previous Session of the House of Assembly that she had confidence in him.   This has of course only changed since his decision to align himself with the PDM.”The PDM Party leader had a message for the people of North and Middle Caicos, that their elected representative would not be resigning.last_img read more

Ferragosto to celebrate its final year with the theme Pirates Invade Sicily

first_img Posted: August 12, 2019 Ferragosto to celebrate its final year with the theme, “Pirates Invade Sicily,” Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom August 12, 2019 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – San Diego’s Little Italy’s Ferragosto is its own take on the traditional summer Italian holiday “Feriae Augusti” and after a decade of bringing the community together to raise money for historical preservation, youth programs and school scholarships, Little Italy’s biggest party, Ferragosto, will go out in style with even more themed surprises in traditional Ferragosto event fashion.Ferragosto, returns for its final year with the theme, “Pirates Invade Sicily,” on Saturday, August 17, from 6:00 p.m. to midnight, with a VIP reception starting at 5:00 p.m.Attendees can expect plenty of food, well poured drinks, pirate-themed pageantry, a cigar and rum lounge, live music, a full casino and more!Visit www.ferragostosd.org for tickets. last_img read more

Trump Inks Huge Increase In Military Appropriations

first_imgSenator Dan Sullivan R-AK: “For that reason, our strategic location, and our strong support from the communities, we’re getting a lot of military construction dollars headed towards our great state.” Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享With the signing of the FY2018 National Defense Authorization Act into law on Tuesday, President Donald Trump set into motion a robust military expansion in Alaska. It also authorizes an early Christmas present: news that all military members will receive 2.4% pay raises. Senator Dan Sullivan R-AKSenator Dan Sullivan R-AK: “Part of the funding is 28 additional interceptors at Fort Greely, so a whole new field.  It has $200M military construction authorization for just that portion.  That is going to be good for country’s missile defence, but it’s also going to be good for Alaska’s economy.” Sullivan says that the bill includes funding for advancing key missile defense technologies and for beginning to build a space-based sensor layer. Sullivan thinks that the numbers add up to a lot of construction jobs in Alaska, in 2018.  He says that over the last three military authorizations, over a billion dollars in construction has been invested in Alaska. It also authorizes funding needed to procure an additional 20 missile interceptors required to operationalize the field.center_img As the hub for air combat power for the Asia-Pacific and the Arctic, Sullivan says that Alaska will be home to more than 100 fifth generation fighter aircraft – probably more than any other place in the world. The Act includes authorization of $12.3B for the Missile Defense Agency. Additionally, it authorizes $168.9 million pointed at supporting the beddown of two squadrons of F-35As at Eielson AFB. Other initiatives include authorization to build a new heavy-class polar icebreaker, a U.S Navy study on ice-hardening its ships, and provisions aimed at improving and increasing the Alaska Guard’s combat search and rescue capabilities. Story as aired:http://www.radiokenai.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Dorene-on-trump-inks-huge-increase-in-military-appropriations.mp3last_img read more

Four interest rate hikes in 2016 to be gradual Richmond Fed President

first_imgThe US Federal Reserve forecasts pointing to four interest rate hikes in 2016 show what the US central bank means when it says it anticipates raising rates at a “gradual pace”, Richmond Fed President Jeffrey Lacker said on Friday.”That’s half the rate at which we raised rates in the last tightening cycle. So that’s what ‘gradual’ means to me,” Lacker told reporters in Charlotte, North Carolina after participating in a business panel discussion.The US Fed raised the range of its benchmark interest rate by a quarter of a percentage point on Wednesday and indicated that further hikes would be gradual. The US central bank also said its median policymaker forecast expected the equivalent of four quarter-point hikes next year.Lacker said he had been in favour of raising rates this past June and was confident inflation would rise “noticeably” toward the Fed’s 2% medium-term target in 2016 if oil prices and the value of the US dollar stabilised.”I hope we’re not behind the curve,” Lacker, who will not have a vote in Fed policy decisions in 2016, said in reference to the US central bank’s monetary policy.In its policy statement on Wednesday the Fed said it would probably not begin trimming its massive holdings of bonds until rate increases were “well under way”, but Lacker said on Friday he favors reducing the balance sheet “as soon as possible”.last_img read more

In new book Richard Rohr says the universal Christ changes everything

first_img By: Cathleen Falsani godgrrl Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Cathleen Falsani Cathleen Falsani is a veteran religion journalist and author, specializing in the intersection of spirituality and culture. She lives in Southern California.,Add Comment Click here to post a comment As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Share This! By: Cathleen Falsani godgrrl Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,Richard Rohr with his book “The Universal Christ.” Courtesy photoALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (RNS) — Along a quiet stretch of Five Points Road in the oldest neighborhood in New Mexico’s largest city, just down the block from the methadone clinic and a house Catholic workers share with homeless folks, lives one of the world’s most famous modern mystics — an infectiously jovial, flannel-plaid-wearing Franciscan friar, with a childlike joy for telling the world that Jesus Christ loves everyone and is in everything.It’s a simple, if radical, idea. And one that some critics of Richard Rohr, the 76-year-old Franciscan who founded the Center for Action and Contemplation in Albuquerque 32 years ago, have described as “dangerous” and even “heretical.”Rohr, one of the most influential Christian contemplatives of the last century, is unfazed by such critiques of what he believes is the theological foundation for a “reformation of the Christian faith.” He unpacks this idea, defending it theologically, historically and scripturally, in his new book, “The Universal Christ: How a Forgotten Reality Can Change Everything We See, Hope For, and Believe.”“This is not heresy, universalism, or a cheap version of Unitarianism,” Rohr writes. “This is the Cosmic Christ, who always was, who became incarnate in time, and who is still being revealed.”While the Cosmic or Universal Christ may be a new idea for many contemporary Christians, Rohr insists it is ancient — part of the “perennial tradition,” which teaches that all wisdom and knowledge in world religions and philosophies are rooted in the same universal source.The perennial tradition “trains you to connect the dots and see what themes keep recurring” in Scripture, he said.Ancient or new, dangerous or revolutionary, “The Universal Christ” has found an enthusiastic audience. Released in early March, the book recently debuted at No. 12 on the New York Times best-seller list for nonfiction.A prolific author with more than 30 books in print, Rohr says “The Universal Christ” is the culmination of everything else he has written and taught and preached in a lifetime of ministry and contemplative practice. It is his magnum opus, if you will.“The Universal Christ” by Richard Rohr. Courtesy photoHe also expects it to be his last book.While by all appearances Rohr seems energetic and even robust, 15 months ago he suffered a heart attack, which came on the heels of a successful battle with prostate cancer in 2015.Recently, however, cancer returned and he is undergoing treatment.“I take four horse pills every day that amount to oral chemotherapy,” Rohr told Religion News Service on a chilly morning as he strolled the grounds of the CAC in late March. “That I could have two things that would normally be fatal and still be sitting here? I am nothing but grateful for the miracle of modern medicine.”While he blithely says he never expected to live to the age of 76, Rohr assures a visitor that his death is not imminent.“I do not have that sense at all, thank God,” he said. “I just know if I’m a realist that I’m in the final stage — whatever that means — of my life.”Although he says “The Universal Christ” is his last major work in print, Rohr hopes to write a short tome, a monograph, on St. Paul’s understanding of sin.Rohr began writing “The Universal Christ” two years ago.“It was the hardest book I ever wrote. … I knew I had to say this and I’ve got nothing to lose at my age,” he said, stopping to greet several members of his four-dozen-strong staff, the CAC office buzzing with activity in preparation for The Universal Christ conference in the Albuquerque Convention Center.Sold out with 2,200 people registered to attend, the conference, which began Thursday (March 28), is the center’s largest-ever event.Over the centuries, much of Christianity has lost track of the “Christ” part of Jesus Christ, Rohr argues in “The Universal Christ.”According to the theology of the Trinity — God in three persons: Father, Son and Holy Spirit — Jesus was fully human and fully divine. Not half and half. Fully both. By minimizing or ignoring Jesus’ identity as the Christ, Rohr believes, Christianity has missed a message central to the gospel: that through Jesus Christ, God loves and redeems “every one” and “every thing.”“If all of this is true,” he writes, “we have a theological basis for a very natural religion that includes everybody. The problem was solved from the beginning. Take your Christian head off, shake it wildly, and put it back on!”Building on Scripture such as Colossians 3:11 — “There is only Christ. He is everything and he is in everything” — and Colossians 1:19-20 — “Through him all things are reconciled, everything in heaven and everything on earth” — Rohr believes that “everything, without exception, is the outpouring of God.”A humpback whale. The whir of a washing machine. A soldier far from home. The Carina Nebula and the Hubble Space Telescope. A woman marching in the streets for her civil rights. A family of asylum-seekers separated at the border. Coffee. Oreos. A sunset. Laughter.Richard Rohr’s black lab, Venus, was a companion for 15 years. “The Universal Christ” is dedicated to the dog. Courtesy photoOr Rohr’s beloved black lab, Venus — his constant companion for 15 years who passed away two years ago — to whom he dedicated “The Universal Christ.”“Without any apology, lightweight theology, or fear of heresy, I can appropriately say that Venus was also Christ for me,” he wrote.Back in his office at CAC, while holding a framed photograph of Venus, he explained, “Whatever evokes from you the flow of love is operating as Christ for you.”Everyone and everything.As he walked from the CAC offices, which are housed in an adobe building more than 100 years old, to the visitor center one-tenth of a mile away, it is obvious that Rohr delights in his surroundings, whether natural or human-made. He points out the white blossoms of a pear tree and the adobe buildings — some of them centuries old — common to Albuquerque’s Barelas community, formally established in 1662 and where he has lived since 1986.He stops near a narrow aqueduct that runs between the CAC properties to explain a bit of the history and function of these “acequias.”The acequias, which are run by the individual communities through which they flow, have gates that control the levels of the water that comes from the Rio Grande to help irrigate farmland. Likely originally dug by Native Americans, the acequias system was expanded during the Spanish colonial period in the 17th and 18th centuries.In his book “Acequia Culture,” historian Jose Rivera describes how the aqueducts play an important cultural and even spiritual role in New Mexico, where annual blessings of the irrigation ditches often combine Catholic and pagan elements.“Acequia culture also demonstrates a great rootedness to place — like water, culture extends deep into the earth,” Rivera wrote.The acequias in Barelas remain in use to this day.“Aren’t they charming?” Rohr said, clearly enthralled by the whole enterprise.Richard Rohr in Albuquerque, N.M. Courtesy photoA native of Topeka, Kan., Rohr entered the Franciscans in 1961 when he was just 18, beginning his theological studies in earnest just as the Second Vatican Council convened in Rome.“It was the wonderful ’60s,” he recalled, chuckling. “The perfect time to be educated, to be given a critical mind, but then given good philosophy and theology to know how to process it — all the negativity that our country went through then and is back into now 10 times worse.”Rohr became ordained to the Catholic priesthood in 1970 and earned a master’s degree in theology from the University of Dayton the same year. In 1971, he founded the New Jerusalem Community (an intentional community that, for a time at least, managed to combine the charismatic and social justice movements) in Cincinnati, where he lived and worked for 15 years before relocating to New Mexico.He connects the dots through his lifetime of contemplative, mystical practice, and social justice activism — carried along by “the flow of Divine Love” — back to his first “awesome experience” with God on his cousins’ farm in western Kansas when he was 13 years old.“I’m just lying in the velvety grass, looking up at all the stars,” Rohr recalled. “I got this personal sense that the universe was a safe place, a good place, and that I was part of it.”Not long after, he decided to go to seminary.“I’ve called it my ‘beautiful place’ ever since,” he said, adding that whenever he’s back in Kansas, he tries to visit the spot. “I still would like to go back there again.”The initial vision he experienced as a boy lying in a Kansas field still inspires Rohr today.He believes the predominant theme that runs throughout Scripture and tradition is grace, which Rohr describes as a kind of divine spackling compound that God uses to fill in the gaps between everything in all of creation.“If something comes toward you with grace and can pass through you and toward others with grace, you can trust it as the voice of God,” he said. “Just give up on anything except the God who is grace itself, the filler of the gaps.” Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 News Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 Share This! By: Cathleen Falsani godgrrlcenter_img Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email News • Photos of the Week Share This! Share This! Cathleen Falsani godgrrl Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.,Churches and other faith-based groups lend a hand after historic Nebraska floods TagsCenter for Action and Contemplation contemplation Franciscans homepage featured Richard Rohr The Universal Christ,You may also like Catholicism Man sentenced to life in prison for murder of Muslim teen Nabra Hassanen Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Emaillast_img read more

How does complex behavior spontaneously emerge in the brain

first_img Citation: How does complex behavior spontaneously emerge in the brain? (2013, August 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-08-complex-behavior-spontaneously-emerge-brain.html A spatial representation of the background avalanche activity in a circular culture with a 2.5-mm radius and density of 300 neurons per mm. Only the top 1% of the most active connections is shown. Different colors correspond to different neuron communities, according to a community detection algorithm. Credit: Javier G. Orlandi, et al. ©2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited In a new study published in Nature Physics, a team of researchers from Spain has shown that emergence in neuronal networks can be explained as a noise-driven phenomenon that is controlled by the interplay between network topology and intrinsic neuronal dynamics. In this scenario, a randomly fired pulse propagates through the network and is amplified by noise focusing, which the researchers describe as an implosive concentration of spontaneous activity. “From the experimental point of view, we show that in neuronal cultures, the emergence early in the development of collective spontaneous activity is dominated by the presence of activity waves that initiate in specific regions of the culture, in a similar way as it happens in vivo,” lead author Javier G. Orlandi at the University of Barcelona told Phys.org. “And with the help of simulations, we also show that you don’t need any special mechanism to explain this behavior, just the right combination of network structure and dynamics. These waves emerge naturally from the noise focusing effect, in which individual firings propagate and concentrate in specific regions to later generate these activity waves.”The researchers arrived at this explanation by combining high-resolution calcium imaging experiments of rat cortical neurons with simulations. The experiments revealed that bursts of neuronal pulses are controlled by waves that originate at small areas called nucleation sites. Although previous research has hinted at the existence of such waves, this study is the first that provides sufficiently high resolution to measure the wave velocity for the first time. The random nature of the wave initiation from spontaneous neuronal firing also supports the idea that it is a noise-driven phenomenon, in which the waves are later amplified to become global bursts.The view of emergence in neural networks as a noise-driven phenomenon differs from the common view in which the bursts of neuronal pulses are controlled by specific leader neurons assisted by the network architecture. In the noise-driven explanation, the nucleation sites do not actively initiate the firing process, but collect and amplify the firing activity that originated elsewhere.As the researchers explain, understanding the full implications of noise focusing in the brain remains a question for future research.”The mechanism of noise focusing emerges naturally in any system with interconnected integrate-and-fire units (like neurons), so its effect should also be present in the brain,” Orlandi said. “If this effect is important in the brain, or by contrast, if the brain has other mechanisms to counter its effect, is still an open question. It could be that noise focusing is responsible for the generation of waves of activity during development, like in the retina, and that it helps the maturation of specific neuronal pathways.”In the future, the researchers plan to further investigate neuronal activity through more in-depth investigations.”We want to see what happens in more complex neuronal systems, like slices or electrode recordings from anaesthetized animals, and see if we find the same effect in there,” Orlandi said. “We know that activity waves are present in these systems, but we still need to see how these waves form exactly, if it is also due to noise focusing or due to something else. It would also be extremely interesting to check what role noise focusing plays in social networks, for example in rumor spreading.”In this analogy, the points of a rumor’s origins can be compared to the nucleation sites where waves originate, and the spreading of a rumor to the brain’s collective neuronal firing. More information: Javier G. Orlandi, et al. “Noise focusing and the emergence of coherent activity in neuronal cultures.” Nature Physics. DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS2686 Journal information: Nature Physics Coherence activity in neuronal cultures from noise focusingcenter_img Explore further (Phys.org) —The idea of emergence, in which complex behavior spontaneously emerges out of simple interactions, exists in a wide variety of areas, such as economics, the Internet, and urban development. But perhaps the ultimate example of emergence is in the brain, where thousands of randomly firing neurons spontaneously reach a coherent state of collective, periodic firing that underlies all brain functions. Despite significant progress, the mechanisms responsible for the origin and maintenance of spontaneous neuronal activity are still poorly understood. © 2013 Phys.org. All rights reserved. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Exfoliate Hyderate and Glow

first_imgExfoliating the skin with body a scrub and hydrating it with a good summer lotion are important things that can help your skin to get a glow and look younger.Dead cells can be knocked off to get radiant skin by following few basic steps religiously, says Manoj Khanna of Enhance Cosmetic and Aesthetic Studio. Exfoliate your body: It’s very important to exfoliate your skin. No matter how much lotion you use, you’re never going to have glowing skin if you don’t exfoliate. Grab a body scrub and hit the shower. Gently rub your exfoliator in circular movements on your entire body from the shoulders down and rinse clean. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Continue to do this two- three times a week for year-round beautiful skin. Go for fresh sunscreen: Throw away last year’s unused sunscreen for a new bottle. Buy a new sunscreen that has Ultraviolet aging and Ultraviolet burning products and comes in SPF 30 and SPF 70.Reapply every one to two hours that you are in the sun to ensure a summer full of safe sun fun. Hydrate your body with a summer-scented lotion: Find a fruity summery lotion, which is light and fast absorbing. Gels and purees are perfect fast absorbers. Make sure you apply it right after you dry off from your shower. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixDon’t forget your feet: Winter boots have long since been packed away; it’s sandal season ladies! Either go and get a pedicure, or give yourself an at-home pedicure. Scrub off the dead dry skin to reveal your sandal ready feet. Keep a foot scrub and file in your shower, and scrub your feet a few times a week. Avoid makeup: During summer, less makeup is best. If you intend to use foundation, then also apply face powder with SPF to avoid patchy skin. To protect your lips, always use a gloss or a lip balm with an SPF 15 to make them feel fresh. Avoid eye makeup in summer. Exfoliating is a good idea during summer because it unclogs  sweat pores as well allowing the body to breathe.last_img read more

Flight passenger dies at Kolkata Airport

first_imgKolkata: A passenger of a Kolkata-Chennai flight died on Monday due to cardiac arrest at the Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose International Airport. He felt uneasy after boarding the flight and was taken to the medical facility at the Kolkata Airport and later rushed to R G Kar Medical College and Hospital where he was declared brought dead. Sources informed that the passenger, identified as Himangshu Das (30), came to Kolkata Airport from Silchar with two of his family members on Monday morning. He was going to Chennai for medical purpose. Around 3 pm, he along with his family members boarded the Air India Kolkata-Chennai flight. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeWhen the flight was about to start, Das told his family members that he was feeling unwell and collapsed on the seat. As he became unconscious, his family members immediately informed the flight crew about his health. Without wasting any time, a medical emergency was declared and on-duty doctor was called in. Das was taken to the airport’s medical facility. Later the doctor from the airport authority suggested to admit Das to a hospital. Immediately, an ambulance was arranged and Das was taken to R G Kar where he was declared brought dead. Doctors suspect that Das had a cardiac arrest just after boarding the flight. Due to this, the flight’s take off from Kolkata happened a few minutes later. Police was informed about the incident. Later cops took charge of the body and sent it for autopsy examination.last_img read more

Another goround at a passenger bill of rights with Garneaus new legislation

first_img OTTAWA — Transport Minister Marc Garneau has introduced legislation to create a new passenger bill of rights, which will give travellers a better idea of when airlines will have to compensate them.The legislation is part of a package of changes to the Canada Transportation Act, which also introduces new foreign ownership limits for airlines, requires railways to install voice and video recorders in locomotives and improves transparency and efficiency in the freight rail industry.Garneau promised the bill of rights last month in the wake of widespread alarm after a United Airlines passenger was injured when he was dragged from a plane in Chicago.Garneau has already told airlines operating in Canada such an incident is not to happen here, but the bill lays out more rules for the industry to follow and spells out in clear language that no one can be involuntarily removed from a plane due to overbooking.The bill will enable the government to force airlines to create clear standards of treatment and compensation for circumstances including being denied boarding, delays while already on board and lost or damaged baggage.More news:  Carnival Cruise Line enhances HUB app for families and youthAirlines will not be able to charge parents a fee to be able to sit next to their children, and carriers will also have to have standards for transporting musical instruments. Tags: Canada Share Posted by Another go-round at a passenger bill of rights with Garneau’s new legislationcenter_img << Previous PostNext Post >> Tuesday, May 16, 2017 The Canadian Press last_img read more

In case its slipped your mind this Sunday March

first_imgIn case it’s slipped your mind, this Sunday March 15th is Mothering Sunday, and what says ‘thanks for being awesome’ more than cheap flights to a cool European city?Swap the forecourt flowers for a fun weekend in France, or shop ‘til you drop in Sweden’s Stockholm. Although, at these low prices you can afford to getaway and still get the stems; extra brownie points for the box of chocs to snack on during the flight.Check out these sweet deals for less than £70*1. Oslo, Norway from £26Still searching for some late season snow? You might just get lucky in Oslo; 20 minutes outside of the city centre there are a whole host of suburban slopes and ice skating facilities for you to enjoy and get your snow sport fix. If Mum prefers more mellow activities then take her on a boat trip to one of the islands off the archipelago to see the famous Norwegian fjords.Check prices 5. Strasbourg, France from £58Swap Paris for Strasbourg and save money on a fancy weekend in France. It may be best known as the home of the European Parliament, but you might find Strasbourg’s bars and clubs a bit more exciting. Get down to the historic Grande Île area for a lesson in lager drinking; the Académie de la Bière is the place to learn all about beer.Check prices 3. Copenhagen, Denmark from £57Explore one of Europe’s greenest cities by bicycle, with lots of lovely routes and free public bike hire. Once you’re done winding through narrow cobbled lanes and along the water’s edge down at the harbour, relax in a cute café. For even more value for money, take a short 25 minute train ride across the Danish border to the historic Swedish city of Malmö.Check pricesRead more: 7 best things to see and do in Copenhagen4. Jersey, UK from £45Famous for their seafood, spoil mother dearest with a trip to the Channel Island of Jersey. Twelve miles off the coast of Normandy in northern France, not only is the flight cheap, but it’s also a tax free haven, so you can skip certain service charges and VAT which will help stretch your budget.Check prices 2. Stockholm, Sweden from £31Super stylish Stockholm is the perfect place to shop for new clothes, Swedish home accessories or souvenirs, like a Dala Horse, a wooden statue and unoffcial symbol of Sweden. After a hard day hitting the stores you’ll need to refuel. Make sure you sample gravlax (smoked salmon) ost (hard cheese) or go for a hearty bowl of traditional meatballs.Check pricescenter_img Related10 flights for £100 or lessSomething for the weekend? 10 bargain flights for under £100 to the very best places to visit this weekend, or book for later.5 romantic city breaks for less than €100You’ll love these bargain flights to seven sweet cities in time for Valentine’s Day!World’s most misleadingly named airports revealed by SkyscannerFrom Stansted to Stockholm, we reveal the 15 airports that are furthest away from where they say there are – and the closest. 6. Luxembourg from £66Little Luxembourg is big on fairytale charm. Spend an afternoon admiring the medieval castle at Vianden. Try an alternative Mother’s Day Sunday roast and grab a plate of judd mat gaardebounen (smoked pork in cream sauce with beans and potatoes) in the quaint capital, Luxembourg City.Check pricesGet more tips on bagging a flight bargain: Find cheap flights with ‘Best Time to Book’ tool from Skyscanner Get the best air fares with Skyscanner Price Alerts! 20 money saving travel tips and secrets *Flight prices correct at time of publication and are for return journeys from the UK 13th-16th March 2015.Skyscanner is the world’s travel search engine, helping your money go further on flights, hotels and car hire.ReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Maplast_img read more

Rep Frederick unveils plan to expand skilled trades instruction in schools

first_img19Oct Rep. Frederick unveils plan to expand skilled trades instruction in schools Categories: Frederick News,News State Rep. Ben Frederick, chairman of the House Workforce and Talent Development Committee, unveiled a plan Wednesday to enhance skilled trades education in Michigan’s public schools while helping students find career opportunities to match their interest and abilities.“This is an opportunity to help our children discover the many paths available to a successful future career,” said Frederick, of Owosso. “This legislation is a product of many hours of study involving our state’s education and employment leaders. We have to provide more flexibility within our K-12 system to supply more opportunities for students.”Roger Curtis, director of the Michigan Department of Talent and Economic Development, and Bill Henderson, chair of the Michigan Manufacturing Association, attended a press conference Wednesday announcing the bipartisan legislation.“This will work alongside proposed Michigan Merit Curriculum flexibility updates we approved in the House to help prepare our students for life and the many career paths available to them,” Frederick said. “This means encouraging rather than discouraging engagement between educators and employers and equal value being given to the professional skills and training required for careers.”The legislation, which has been assigned to the Workforce and Talent Development Committee, will:Create a K-12 model program that emphasizes career learning and themes for each grade level, while focusing on engaging with parents, community businesses and industry interests;Provide continuing education and professional development credit for teachers who spend time engaging with local employers and professional trade centers.Allow proprietary schools, community colleges and skilled trade employers access – with parental consent – to high school pupil directory information for the purposes of recruitment and career opportunities.Permit schools to more readily hire professional trade instructors to teach classes that align with their expertise.last_img read more

Cyfrowy Polsatowned OTT service Ipla has added co

first_imgCyfrowy Polsat-owned OTT service Ipla has added combat sports channel FightKlub to its programming line-up. FightKlub will be part of the Ipla Sport and larger Ipla Mix packages, which includes sports channels found in the Ipla Sport offering.FightKlub covers Polish and world boxing as well as this week’s World Judo Championship in Rio de Janeiro. Ipla is available via PCs, Android and iOS mobile devices, LG, Samsung and Panasonic smart TVs and the Netia Player service.last_img

Sponsor Advertisement

first_imgSponsor Advertisement MAX Resource Corp. (TSX:MXR) is focused on a newly-defined copper/silver/gold porphyry system at Majuba Hill in Nevada that is highly prospective for a bulk-tonnage, open pit deposit.  MAX recently completed a Phase II core drilling program and additional soil sampling in a step-out drilling program at the DeSoto discovery near the past producing Desoto silver mine at Majuba.Drilling earlier in the year encountered long intervals of high-grade silver and copper near surface in five of eight holes, as well as significant gold intercepts, such as 44.2 m of 71.0 g/t Silver, 0.15 g/t Gold and 1.14% Copper.  Further assay results and soil geochemistry are expected in February/March 2012. Permitting is underway for an extensive Phase III delineation drill program at Desoto to begin in the spring of 2012.For more information: www.maxresource.com or info@maxresource.com You have to ask yourself why the precious metals are getting trashed in the face of one of the biggest financial crisis of our lifetimes.Gold set another new low for this move down about an hour before London opened yesterday.  From that low, the gold price rallied right a bit right up until the Comex open…and was under a bit of selling pressure from that point onward.But the major selling pressure came once the Comex was through trading at 1:30 p.m. Eastern time…with the low price tick of the day [$1,540.70 spot] coming just moments before 4:00 p.m. in New York in the very thinly traded electronic market.  From that low, gold recovered a few dollars going into the close at 5:15 p.m. Eastern.Gold finished the Thursday trading day at $1,544.30…down another $12.20.  Net volume was pretty decent at around 143,000 contracts.It was pretty much the same price pattern in silver…except the engineered sell-off was far more intense.  Silver’s low price tick [$27.51 spot] came at the same time as gold’s…and the silver price recovered about 20 cents going into the electronic close.Silver closed the day at $27.72 spot…down 46 cents from Monday.  Net volume was pretty high at 37,000 contracts, more or less.The dollar index traded in a narrow 10 basis point range of 80.60 for a goodly portion of Tuesday.  That lasted until shortly before 9:00 a.m. in New York…and then away it went to the upside until about 3:20 p.m. Eastern time where it traded sideways into the close.  The dollar index closed up about 65 basis points.The gold stocks started off in positive territory…and then got sold off…but recovered back to unchanged just before lunch in New York.  It was all down hill from there.  The HUI got smacked for another 3.83%.The silver stocks really got crucified again…and Nick Laird’s Silver Sentiment Index took it on the chin for another 5.95%.(Click on image to enlarge)The CME’s Daily Delivery Report showed that 1 gold and 123 silver contracts were posted for delivery on Friday.  The big short/issuer was Merrill with 113 contracts…and the short/stoppers were a mixed bag.  The link to the Issuers and Stoppers Report is here.There were no changes in either GLD or SLV yesterday.  Ted Butler and I were discussing the big 1.6 million ounce surprise deposit in SLV on Monday…and Ted figured it probably had something to do with covering a short position in SLV shares.  We’ll know more when the new report is posted over at shortsqueeze.com a week from today.The U.S. Mint had a sales report worthy of the name yesterday.  The sold 3,000 ounces of gold eagles…500 one-ounce 24K gold buffaloes…and 150,000 silver eagles.  Month-to-date the mint has sold 34,500 ounces of gold eagles…1,500 one-ounce 24K gold buffaloes…and 1,135,000 silver eagles.It was a busy day over at the Comex-approved depositories on Monday.  They reported receiving 1,526,942 troy ounces of silver…and shipped 305,421 ounces of the stuff out the door.  The link to that action is here.German gold analyst Dimitri Speck was kind enough to send me several of his excellent charts…and I’m more than happy to post them here.  I’ll post the gold charts today…and the silver charts tomorrow.The first chart shows the “Intraday Price Movements” in gold over about eighteen years.  The high at the London open…and the low at the London p.m. gold fix…are the most prominent features.(Click on image to enlarge)The second chart shows the intraday price movements for the first quarter of 2012…and there are subtle differences, but the overall price pattern is the same…and only the times of the highs and lows have shifted.(Click on image to enlarge)And lastly, here’s the chart for 2011 on its own…the same, but slightly different once again.  The negative price bias in London really stands out in this chart.(Click on image to enlarge)I have a lot of stories again today…and I hope you have time to read through most of themWhile the US Dollar and Treasury debt are the twin foundations of the system, the major modern indicators of how the system is functioning are the stock market and the precious metals, Gold in particular but also Silver. A stock market investment is a bet ON the system, a purchase of physical Gold and/or Silver is a bet AGAINST it. This is clearly shown by the lengths to which the financial powers that be will go to support the stock market – and to undermine the price of the precious metals. – Bill Buckler, The Privateer, 12 May 2012Well, the pain continued unabated again yesterday.  Everything that occurred up to and including the close of Comex trading at 1:30 p.m. in New York yesterday, should be in this Friday’s Commitment of Traders Report…and as I pointed out in this space yesterday, it should be a stunner.Unfortunately, ‘da boyz’ leaned on the precious metals particularly hard after the Comex close yesterday…and that data won’t be in Friday’s report.Here are the 3-year charts for all four precious metals, with the exception of palladium, which had a price bounce yesterday, every other precious metal is more oversold than its been in the last three years.(Click on image to enlarge)(Click on image to enlarge)(Click on image to enlarge)(Click on image to enlarge)As I mentioned further up in this column, you have to ask yourself why the precious metals are getting trashed in the face of one of the biggest financial crisis of our lifetimes.  One only has to read Bill Buckler’s quote above to understand.But once this engineered ‘correction’ has run its course, it’s my guess that JPMorgan et al will be nowhere to be found [fingers crossed!] on the next rally…unless it’s a short-covering rally that they themselves instigate.I’ve been watching the precious metals ever since they opened for trading in the Far East earlier today…and in London this morning.  Once again, the ‘salami is being sliced’ to the downside…as more new lows were set in all four precious metals shortly after the London open.  Net volumes as of 4:49 a.m. Eastern time were monstrous in both metals.  In gold it was 46,000 contracts…and in silver it was just under 10,000 contracts.  The dollar index rallied about 25 basis points overnight, but topped out shortly after the London open…and is now back to virtually unchanged from Tuesday’s New York close.One has to wonder just how much more ‘oversold’ this market can get, as we are already in record territory in that regard…and I’ll be watching the price activity during the Comex trading session in New York with great interest when I get out of bed later this morning.See you on Thursday.last_img read more

Interviewed by Louis James Editor International

first_img(Interviewed by Louis James, Editor, International Speculator) L: Doug, after conversations like the one we had last week, we often get letters from angry readers who accuse you of hating America, disloyalty, and perhaps even treason. These people don’t know or understand what I do about you – that you love the idea that was America. It’s the United State it has become for which you have nothing but contempt. Perhaps we should try to explain this to them? Doug: I doubt it would work; it’s a tough row to hoe, trying to explain things to people who are so set in their thinking that they truly and literally don’t want to hear anything that might threaten their notions. A person who feels threatened by ideas and who responds with emotion is acting irrationally. How can we have a discussion with someone whose emotion trumps their reason? How do we even begin to untangle the thinking of people who will gather this week to give thanks for the bounty produced by freedom and hard work – the famous puritan work ethic – by eating a turkey bought with food stamps? But we can outline the ideas, for the record. L: I’ll bring a copy if they ever do put you on trial for thoughtcrime – which is frighteningly close to being real these days and called treason to boot. Doug: It’s not just close; it’s here. Just try telling an unapproved joke in a security line in an airport these days. L: True enough. Where to begin? Doug: At the beginning. America was founded as a confederation of independent countries – that’s what a state is. Or was, in our language. The original United States of America was a confederation of countries that banded together for protection against larger and more powerful countries they feared might be hostile. This is not a disputed interpretation of history, but as solid a fact as the study of history produces – and yet a largely neglected one. L: We did cover this ground briefly in our conversations on the Civil War and the Constitution. Doug: So we did… the short version being that the US Constitution was essentially a coup; the delegates to what we now call the Constitutional Convention were not empowered to replace the existing government – only to improve upon the Articles of Confederation between the then-independent states. The framers of the Constitution drafted it with the notion of a national government already in place, but calmed fears of loss of state sovereignty by calling the new government the “United States of America” – a verbal sleight of hand that worked for over half a century. Then the southern states decided to exercise what these words imply; their right to leave the union. While slavery was and is a wholesale criminal activity I object to in every way possible, the southern states did have the right to secede, both legally and ethically. But the question was settled by force, not reason, and the wrong side won. L: Another coup? Doug: More like an exposure of the first one for the whole world to see. But by then it was way too late. Despite this, the relative freedom of the US – because it was for many years far freer than other countries – made it possible for artists, engineers, inventors, and businesspeople to flourish and create a society more wealthy and powerful than any the world had ever seen. This is what I call the idea of America – the America That Was. But the seeds of destruction were already sown at the very beginning – with the Alien and Sedition Acts being perhaps the first highly visible step in the wrong direction. Then came the forceful assertion of one national government, with states reduced to administrative regions via the War of Southern Secession, from 1861-’65. I’m no fan of state governments, incidentally, but at least they’re smaller and closer to their subjects than the federal government. Another major step in the wrong direction occurred with the Spanish-American War of 1898, where the US acquired an overseas empire by force. The next major step downhill was the creation of the Federal Reserve and the income tax, both in 1913, just in time for World War I. It took time for these things to make the system crash, because it was still a fairly free economy. L: But crash it did in 1929… Doug: Yes. And it led to the Great Depression of 1929-’46, which lasted so long entirely because of the unmitigated disaster of the New Deal (which we discussed recently). The New Deal injected socialist-fascist ideas into mainstream American thought like a poisonous acid, corrupting the heart of the idea of America that once made the place great. The process was completed with Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society, which really established the basis of the welfare-warfare state. It truly set the stage for the total ethical, economic, social, political, and even military disaster now unfolding before our eyes. Still, the beating heart of the idea of America – which is to say both social and economic freedom – took time to corrupt. Like a strong man who doesn’t know he’s headed for a heart attack, American culture didn’t really peak until the 1950s. The bullet-finned 1959 Cadillac is a symbol of this peak, in my mind. L: Then we had Johnson and his “guns and butter” policy – War in Vietnam and War on Poverty at the same time – followed by tricky Dick kicking the last leg out of under the stool by taking the dollar off an even theoretical gold standard. Doug: Yes. Nixon was arguably even a worse President than Johnson, with the devaluation of the dollar in 1971 and his creation of the War on Drugs. Things have spiraled out of control since then. In The Casey Report, we’ve written reams about these last decades and how they led to and shaped what’s happening now. But I have to say, the focus has been largely financial. L: Which is as it should be, in a publication designed to help investors navigate these turbulent times. Doug: Yes, but the corruption goes way beyond that, beyond even the senseless wars and idiotic foreign policy we discussed last week. America, once the land of the brave and the home of the free, is well on its way to becoming a police state – worse than any we’ve seen in the past, including the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany. L: How could it get worse than that? Doug: Because Big Brother has better technology now, allowing possible manipulation and control of the population that Stalin and Hitler never dreamed of. And because the US used to be such a great place, a lot of people have been tricked into believing it’s the same as it was. But there’s no more resemblance between the America of old and the US of today than there was between the Rome of the Republic and the Rome of the later emperors. Furthermore, most Americans have conflated the government with society. They’re not only different things, but often antithetical. L: I thought you said you’re an optimist! Doug: I am. But that’s for the survivors who make it through the wringer the global economy – and every person on this planet – is about to go through. I keep telling you that the coming Greater Depression is going to be even worse than I think it is. You may think I’m joking, but I’m not. I do think that, primarily for reasons we discussed in our conversation on technology, what comes next will not only be even better than I imagine, it will be better than I can imagine… but first we have to go through the wringer. I see no way around it. I truly don’t. L: Okay, I know you believe that. Can you substantiate the police-state claim? Doug: Well, rather than give you anecdotal evidence – of which there are masses more each day – let me refer to a rather perceptive blog post by a George Washington law professor named Jonathan Turley, titled 10 Reasons Why the US Is No Longer the Land of the Free. I’m sure I don’t see everything the way the professor does, but the list struck me as quite accurate and very important for people to understand. L: I’m sure I don’t want to hear this, but okay, shoot. Doug: [Chuckles] Maybe you don’t, but I know you value the truth. These points underline something I’ve said for years: the Bill of Rights is a completely dead letter. It’s essentially meaningless and rarely even gets the benefit of lip service. Quoting it will result in derision, if not arrest as a dangerous radical. Frankly, I didn’t think the civil liberties situation could get worse than it was under Cheney-Bush, but it has. Obama has repealed none of what they did – and added more. So, let’s go through the list. First: Assassination of U.S. citizens: “President Obama has claimed, as President George W. Bush did before him, the right to order the killing of any citizen considered a terrorist or an abettor of terrorism.” Of course the very concept of terrorism is highly malleable, with over 100 definitions floating about – as we’ve discussed. But apart from that, it’s now accepted that the president and his minions have the right to kill almost anyone. This conceit will get completely out of control after the next real or imagined major terrorist incident. L: This reminds me of the extraordinary powers given to government agents to battle the War On Some Drugs – like the RICO statutes – which have now been turned against ordinary citizens who have nothing to do with the drug trade. Doug: Exactly. Once you give the state a power – for whatever good reason you imagine it needs it – it will use that power for whatever those in charge feel is in their interests. And those in charge are never saints. Next: Indefinite detention: “Under the law signed last month, terrorism suspects are to be held by the military; the president also has the authority to indefinitely detain citizens accused of terrorism.” This was a precedent set by Guantánamo, where scores of the accused continue to rot without even a kangaroo-court trial. Arbitrary justice: “The president now decides whether a person will receive a trial in the federal courts or in a military tribunal, a system that has been ridiculed around the world for lacking basic due process protections. Bush claimed this authority in 2001, and Obama has continued the practice.” As the government becomes more powerful, it’s completely predictable that everything – including the justice system – will become ever more politicized. And government very rarely relinquishes a power it’s gained. I particularly like the Supreme Court ruling in April 2012 that allows anyone who’s arrested for anything – including littering or jaywalking – to be strip-searched. L: Note to readers: you can’t hear Doug’s voice, but I assure you that his use of the word “like” is sarcastic. Doug: Just so. Moving right along: Warrantless searches: “The president may now order warrantless surveillance, including a new capability to force companies and organizations to turn over information on citizens’ finances, communications and associations. Bush acquired this sweeping power under the Patriot Act in 2001, and in 2011, Obama extended the power, including searches of everything from business documents to library records.” Privacy is now a completely dead concept, from both a legal and a practical point of view. If you want to retain privacy, you now have no alternative to relocating outside the US. L: Or any advanced Western country. I’ve read that there are more surveillance cameras per square mile in London than anywhere else. Doug: I’ve heard that too. The opposite being true in rural Argentina is one of the things I like about it. Back to the list: Secret evidence: “The government now routinely uses secret evidence to detain individuals and employs secret evidence in federal and military courts. It also forces the dismissal of cases against the United States by simply filing declarations that the cases would make the government reveal classified information that would harm national security…” “National security” essentially amounts to nothing more than government security, which amounts to cover for the individuals in the government. Nazi Germany and the USSR were national-security states. As I’ve tried to explain in the past, once a critical mass is reached, it’s impossible to reform a government. I believe we’ve reached that state in the US. War crimes: “The world clamored for prosecutions of those responsible for waterboarding terrorism suspects during the Bush administration, but the Obama administration said in 2009 that it would not allow CIA employees to be investigated or prosecuted for such actions. This gutted not just treaty obligations but the Nuremberg principles of international law.” Torture by field operatives under the stress of combat is one thing; torture as official policy is something else again. But torture is now accepted in the US. Worse, there are far more serious war crimes than torture being committed in the name of the US that are going unpunished. L: This is, after all, a far darker version of the same US government that deliberately infected black US citizens with syphilis just to see what would happen, and sent US citizens of Japanese descent to concentration camps during WWII. Doug: Exactly. The next point is: Secret court: “The government has increased its use of the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which has expanded its secret warrants to include individuals deemed to be aiding or abetting hostile foreign governments or organizations. In 2011, Obama renewed these powers, including allowing secret searches of individuals who are not part of an identifiable terrorist group.” You no longer live in a free country when there’s zero privacy for citizens, but 100% secrecy for the government and those it employs. Immunity from judicial review: “Like the Bush administration, the Obama administration has successfully pushed for immunity for companies that assist in warrantless surveillance of citizens, blocking the ability of citizens to challenge the violation of privacy.” The government has outsourced some of its functions – not least the use of contractors in war zones. Increasingly, being associated with the government gives you a “get out of jail free” card. In the USSR they called this a “krisha” – a roof. Continual monitoring of citizens: “The Obama administration has successfully defended its claim that it can use GPS devices to monitor every move of targeted citizens without securing any court order or review.” Bad as this is, it’s just one example. There’s also the use of domestic drones, and hundreds of thousands of cameras that take pictures of everyone everywhere. Extraordinary renditions: “The government now has the ability to transfer both citizens and noncitizens to another country under a system known as extraordinary rendition, which has been denounced as using other countries, such as Syria, Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Pakistan, to torture suspects.” Yes, if someone is kidnapped, there’s plausible deniability if the torturing is done abroad by a third party. And they’re likely to have even fewer compunctions. L: That’s a pretty depressing list, Doug. Doug: And this is just the beginning. As I’ve said before, I don’t call the shots – just try to tell the truth as I see it. The point is that you couldn’t assemble a list like this even 15 years ago. But now it’s part of the firmament. Worse, it’s going to grow. As the economy turns down over the next few years, the people – acting like scared chimpanzees – will ask the government to “do something.” And it will. The trend is going hyperbolic. L: I can’t argue… and I agree it is not likely to be stopped. So if this is a sure trend, are there investment implications? Doug: This just goes to reinforce what I’ve been saying for some time. As great as a US citizen’s risk is in the marketplace these days, the greatest single risk to their wealth and health is the government. People simply must internationalize to diversify their political risk. I can’t stress that strongly enough. L: Would you go so far as to say that being a taxpayer in the US now is like being a Jew in Germany in the mid-1930s? Doug: That’s a good analogy. It’s costly and upsetting to uproot, but the risk if you don’t is unimaginably worse. And I would warn people in other countries to take the same precautions. All of these nation-states are dying dinosaurs that will cause a lot of damage as they thrash about in their death throes. No place is completely safe, but you improve your odds by not putting your eggs all in one basket. L: Okay, I guess we’ve covered that plenty of times. Is there a “police-state play” – any investments one could make before the new Iron Curtain slams down? Handcuff manufacturers? Doug: Nah – they have those plastic zip-binder things now; they’re so cheap that I doubt the manufacturer can even make big money in volume. But I do remember a speech I attended in the ’90s given by William Bennett, the ex-Drug Czar, who recommended investing in prisons. I excoriated him as a sociopath at that meeting – but he was right. However, that ship has sailed; it’s hard to believe the US can incarcerate more than the current 2.3 million people. Besides, I find it morally offensive to capitalize what I consider to be criminal enterprises. No, for now the only absolutely crystal-clear imperative is as above: You’ve got t have a Plan B ready in case you need to get out of Dodge – and you need it pronto. And to those who will be celebrating Thanksgiving this week, I urge you to remind those you carve the turkey with that it was hard work and the freedom to profit from it that created the bounty the pilgrims celebrated. It was this enterprising spirit and the liberty to exercise it that was the heart of the idea of the America That Was – the idea that made America great. Those corrupt politicians who have been undermining these values for so long, and the willfully ignorant ideologues who support them, are responsible for turning this country into the United (Police) State of America. They should be criticized and opposed at every opportunity. L: Okay, Doug. Thanks for another challenging but enlightening conversation. Doug: My pleasure. On this day before the Thanksgiving holiday, we here at Casey Research want to thank you for being a loyal subscriber to Casey Daily Dispatch. People like you who support our work have enabled us to experience enviable growth (earlier this year, Inc. 5000 magazine – again – listed us among the fastest-growing private businesses in the US). Every year, thousands of investors from around the world grow right along with us by “crisis investing” – making calculated speculations designed to leverage calamities like the one Doug is warning about. At a time when most investors are struggling to make money, subscribers of our oldest and most reputable service are currently sitting on a number of triple-digit gains in select precious-metals companies. That service is Casey International Speculator, and on Friday – for one day only – we’re offering 50% off a yearly subscription. As you’re a loyal reader of the Casey Daily Dispatch, we’re offering you a chance to claim your 50% off subscription before everyone else. Learn more about this offer and how Casey International Speculator can help you grow your portfolio. Thank you again for your continued support, and have a Happy Thanksgiving.last_img read more

No one is going to lift a finger to stop them or

first_imgNo one is going to lift a finger to stop them, or utter a word in protest The gold price did little of anything up until noon Hong Kong time—and after that it quietly sold off to just under the $1,300 mark.  The two attempts to break back above that price got sold down almost immediately—and after the second sell-off that came just after the London close, gold traded flat for the remainder of the New York session. The high and down price ticks aren’t worth the trouble of looking up. Gold closed the Monday session at $1,296.90 spot, down $5.40 from Friday’s close.  Volume, net of April and May, was extremely light at 88,000 contracts. The dollar index closed on Friday at 80.43.  It traded pretty flat until around 12:30 p.m Hong Kong time—and then began to head south, hitting its 80.20 low just before 12 o’clock noon in New York.  After that it traded almost ruler flat into the close, finishing the Monday session at 80.22—down 21 basis points on the day. The interesting thing to note is that virtually all of the major price declines in all four precious metals occurred between noon in Hong Kong and noon in New York yesterday.  It’s a pretty safe call to say that there was absolutely no correlation between the dollar index and precious metal prices yesterday. Like gold and silver, platinum and palladium were under selling pressure for virtually the entire day, with most of the selling pressure really getting started around noon Hong Kong time.  Then platinum got hit for $20—and palladium got smoked for over 3% starting shortly after the London close—about the same time as gold and silver got sold down.  After the spikes down in their respective prices, they didn’t recover much. And as I hit the ‘send’ button on today’s efforts at 5:28 a.m. EDT, all four precious metals continue to struggle higher as JPMorgan et al throw everything they can at their prices.  Gold volume is almost triple what it was about three hours ago.  Silver is still above the $20 spot price mark, but struggling. Volume is well over double what it was before this rally started, but still very low all things considered—around 8,300 contracts.  The volumes in both silver and gold are almost all confined to their respective current front months—so it’s obvious that the HFT boyz are out in force.  Platinum and palladium are still up, but have made little upwards progress since London opened, as even the tiniest rally is being sold down.  The dollar index is now a hair below the 80.00 mark—and currently down about 25 basis points from Monday’s close in New York. I haven’t the foggiest idea what price scenarios will greet me when I power up my computer later this morning, but the one thing that is obvious, is that JPMorgan et al have no intentions of letting precious metal prices rise at the moment, as they have obviously drawn a line in the sand here.  Could they get over run?  Sure, but if they do, it will be—as Ted Butler is wont to say from time to time—the first time it has ever happened.  So the odds aren’t lookin’ good. But one of these days it will be different. I’m off to bed.  See you here tomorrow. With the gold price, along with the general equity markets, both in the red yesterday, it was a bit of a surprise to see the gold stocks in the green.  Of course, once the gold price got smacked back below the $1,300 spot price mark after the London close, down went the gold stocks as well.  But, despite that, they continued to rally after that—and closed virtually unchanged—down 0.07%. Sponsor Advertisement Silver got sold off about 15 cents within the first 15 minutes of trading at the Sunday night open in New York.  The subsequent ‘rally’ latest until 10 a.m. Hong Kong time—and then it got sold down [unsteadily] to it’s low of the day which came at the noon silver fix in London.  The subsequent rally got capped the moment that it hit the $20 spot price mark—shortly after the London close as well—and that was it for the day. The high and low tick were reported by the CME Group as $20.015 and $19.775 in the May contract. Silver finished the day at $19.865 spot, down 9 cents from Friday’s close.  Net volume was fumes and vapours at 15,500 contracts. The CME’s Daily Delivery Report showed that 8 gold and 3 silver contracts were posted for delivery within the Comex-approved depositories tomorrow.  The Issuers and Stoppers Report isn’t worth linking. I note that there are about 1,300 gold contracts still open in the April delivery month, along with a tiny handful of silver contracts. There were no reported changes in GLD yesterday—and as of 10:36 p.m. yesterday evening, there were no reported changes in SLV, either. There was a decent sales report from the U.S. Mint yesterday.  They sold 1,500 troy ounces of gold eagles—3,000 one-ounce 24K gold buffaloes—and 659,500 silver eagles. Over at the Comex-approved depositories on Friday, they reported receiving 37,779 troy ounces of gold, most of which went into the depositories over at HSBC USA.  Only 291 troy ounces were reported shipped out.  The link to that activity is here. In silver, there was 498,354 troy ounces reported received—and all of it disappeared into the Delaware depository.  39,020 troy ounces shipped out.  The link to that action is here. I have a decent number of stories for you today—and I’ll leave the final edit up to you. It’s important to remember that the Mint is producing and selling Silver Eagles at record capacity this year, yet is still, in effect, unable to keep up with demand. This is a familiar circumstance with Silver Eagles over the past few years, a circumstance not witnessed with Gold Eagles in general. Along with the highly unique movements in COMEX warehouse inventories, this is another decidedly physical factor specific to silver.  While I don’t know who the big buyer of Silver Eagles may be, certainly we can conclude that the buyer strongly expects higher silver prices in time (no one buys anything investment related with the expectation of lower prices). A subscriber passed along a thought that was already in the back of my mind, namely, that buying Silver Eagles from the Mint might be a way for a big buyer to accumulate physical silver with very little impact on price. I can’t help but think that the COMEX silver warehouse shuffling and extraordinary Silver Eagle sales are two big factors in a developing silver physical story that could [and should] end in pronounced shortage. – Silver analyst Ted Butler: 05 April 2014 Even though volumes in both gold and silver were very light on Monday, it was obvious that there was a seller there to make sure that gold closed below $1,300—and silver below $20 spot.  Why platinum got hit—and palladium hammered—certainly had nothing to do with any real-world supply/demand fundamentals that I’m aware of.  But, like they are in gold and silver, JPMorgan et al can do pretty much as they please in the precious metal arena, as no one is going to life a finger to stop them, or utter a word in protest.  Yesterday’s price action in all four precious metals had their boot prints all over it. Here are the 6-month charts for both gold and silver once again.  Nothing has changed as far as Ted’s [and my] opinion of the situation, as the technical set up still indicates that “da boyz” could peel another $100 off the gold price—and a more than a buck off silver.  We could also blast off from here as well—and I certainly don’t want to say “This time it’s different”—as that will be the kiss of death for sure. As I said on several occasion last week, the latest being Saturday, that all we can do is wait this out and see what develops. In Far East trading on their Tuesday, all was quiet once again, although prices developed a positive bias right from the open in early morning trading—and volumes were very light, although not quite as light as they were on Monday.  That all changed in gold and silver around 1:30 p.m. Hong Kong time, as gold spiked above $1,300 the ounce and silver above $20 the ounce.  Platinum and palladium were up a decent amount as well, but their rallies were much more subdued. And as I type this paragraph, London has been open about 35 minutes—and it’s obvious that the prices of both gold and silver are being actively capped, as volumes have exploded—and are up more that 100% from what they were before the price spikes occurred.  So it’s obvious that JPMorgan et al are throwing a blizzard of Comex paper at both metal to kill these rallies.  The dollar index, which had been trading as flat as the proverbial pancake for most of the Far East trading session, began to head south around 2:45 p.m. Hong Kong time—about 15 minutes before the London open. This is what the Kitco gold chart looked like at 5:25 a.m. EDT. The silver shares followed a similar price/chart pattern, but Nick Laird’s Intraday Silver Sentiment Index closed down a somewhat more substantial 1.18%. Freegold Ventures Limited is a North American gold exploration company with three gold projects in Alaska. Current projects include Golden Summit, Vinasale and Rob. Both Vinasale and Golden Summit host NI 43-101 Compliant Resource Calculations. An updated NI 43-101 resource was calculated on Golden Summit in October 2012 and using 0.3 g/t cutoff  the current resource is 73,580,000 tonnes grading 0.67 g/t Au for total of 1,576,000 contained ounces in the indicated category, and 223,300,000 tonnes grading 0.62 g/t Au for a total of 4,437,000 contained ounces in the inferred category. In addition to the Golden Summit Project the Vinasale also hosts a NI 43-101 resource calculation which was updated in March 2013. Indicated resources are 3.41 million tonnes averaging 1.48 g/t Au for 162,000 ounces, and Inferred resources are 53.25 million tonnes averaging 1.05 g/t Au for 1,799,000 ounces of gold utilizing a cutoff value of 0.5 grams/tonne (g/t) as a possible open pit cutoff. Please send us an email for more information, ir@freegoldventures.comlast_img read more

Have you ever wondered what really happens behind

first_imgHave you ever wondered what really happens behind the scenes at a rock concert? My good friend Stew is a top audio engineer—you know, the guy who wears thousand-dollar headphones and stands below the stage manning dials at rock concerts the world over. I shadowed him backstage a handful of times, and the scene was not what I thought it would be. Sure, they all dressed the rocker part, but I was blown away by everyone’s professionalism. Today Chris Wood and I are taking you backstage at a much more conservative venue—but one that could make your retirement a whole lot richer. Chris is the managing senior analyst at Casey Research; his responsibilities include recruiting and training new analysts in “The Casey Way,” and heading up research for the entire technology team. He also teams up with our chief analyst Andrey Dashkov and me to manage the Money Forever portfolio. When I started Miller’s Money Forever, I already subscribed to Casey’s contrarian mantra: Look where nobody else is looking. The most successful investors take invaluable nuggets of information uncovered by world-class analysts and watch their investments grow long before the mainstream catches on. This is the game for my colleagues on the metals and mining, energy, and technology teams, as well as my own squad. When we applied this philosophy to a highly diversified, high-yield portfolio designed to enrich retirees and conservative investors alike—all while guarding their nest eggs against catastrophic loss and the silent killer, inflation—I imagined our portfolio would hold many household names. Turns out, it does: 5 or 6, I’d say, out of our 20 current holdings. Whether we’re recommending a company whose products you likely have in your cupboard or an international, high-yield energy play, our approach stays the same. The take-home message is that this approach works. At our most recent publication date, the stock, high-yield, and stable-income portions of our portfolio showed gains of 23.6%, 13.2%, and 2.7% respectively—without taking on more risk than befits a low-stress retirement. On that note, let’s talk to Chris about how we’re making that happen and how our method can make your retirement a rich one.Dennis Miller: Welcome. Thanks for taking the time to chat, Chris. Please tell our readers a bit about your background.Chris Wood: My pleasure, Dennis. My background is really in valuation. I double majored in economics and finance in college, then spent several years as a commercial appraiser and valuation consultant where I appraised a huge variety of commercial properties and private businesses. Then I returned to graduate school, and a few months after I received my MBA with a finance concentration, I started at Casey Research. When I arrived at Casey, the learning curve was much steeper than I’d expected. I mean, I had an MBA and a lot of real-world experience valuing companies. What could I have to learn? Turns out a lot. For most of my appraisal and business valuation jobs, I’d used discounted cash flow and sales comparison analyses to determine a business’ or property’s market value. There were subtleties I won’t get into here, but the basic idea was to calculate the most probable price at which the subject would trade in a competitive and open market at a given point in time. Publicly traded equities are a different beast because that figure is already available. It’s the stock price, or in the case of a whole business it’s the market capitalization (i.e., the stock price multiplied by the number of shares outstanding). So, the job of analysts at Casey Research boils down to determining if the prevailing market price of a stock is cheap, fair, or expensive. Our goal is to find stocks that are “on sale.” Now, that can mean a couple of things. They might just be out of favor with Wall Street and have a stock price that doesn’t reflect their true value based on their current operation. It can also mean understanding and believing in their business plan and profiting as they add value to their bottom line. In the world of publicly traded equities, investors should never pay fair value. You want to buy the stock at a discount and think about selling it when it reaches fair value.Dennis: I want to make sure our readers caught that. You’re saying we never want to pay fair value for a stock; that’s when we want to sell it?Chris: Exactly. Of course, you already knew that. Consider Hess, which you and your analyst team recommended back in August 2012. The stock was out of favor with Wall Street, but Hess is operating in one of the world’s top oil areas—the Bakken Shale—and its valuation ratios were very attractive. It had also begun to realign its business focus in a way that made sense to us. We made the call ahead of others, and as the market realized what we already knew, the stock price increased. We determined that the stock was trading at a discount—trading below fair value—and when the market caught on, the stock price came to meet us. As a result, we realized a 78.3% gain on Hess, including stock appreciation, dividends, and income from the covered call options we wrote on the company.Dennis: Subscribers ask me what it means to “look where no one else is looking.” When a new analyst asks you that question, how do you answer?Chris: Well, it’s an underpinning of a contrarian approach to investing, but it translates into different specifics for our various teams. For the metals team, it’s quite literal. They trek all over the world visiting early-stage, under-the-radar miners on the verge of making a big strike. For the technology team, it often means digging into the science of an undiscovered small biotech outfit that could have a blockbuster cancer drug on its hands. At Money Forever, you and your analysts apply that same approach to a wide variety of sectors.Dennis: Our publication focuses on retirement money, not speculating on the next hot technology trend or company trying to get the next miracle cure through the FDA. How do you teach our analysts to apply those principles to less-speculative investments?Chris: Well, let’s look at what your goals are. You want a safe portfolio that beats inflation and throws off enough income so your subscribers can retire rich. Buying a bunch of utility stocks and holding a few mutual funds won’t cut it. Your subscribers need income and appreciation. That means we look well past charts and dig into companies—much deeper than just reading the annual reports. Then we validate the data. We train our analysts to go beyond the 10-Ks and 10-Qs—to contact the company and ask tough questions; to independently verify as much as possible; and to take every answer from management with a grain of salt. The average S&P 500 company is paying a 1.83% dividend. While a company might be performing well and increasing dividends, it could take a decade or more before dividend increases surpass inflation and allow you to take some money out to live on. That’s why we hunt for stock with real potential to appreciate on top of dividends. Lots of companies are considered out of favor by Wall Street—many for good reason. We uncover why they’re out of favor and what they’re doing to turn things around. There are plenty of opportunities out there; we train our analysts where to look and what to look for.Dennis: I imagine finding qualified analysts is challenging. Can you expand on the skills and qualities they need?Chris: Of course. In addition to being strong analysts and writers, they have to be self-motivated, passionate about what we do, and able to come up with good investment ideas and defensible conclusions. All the spreadsheets and number-crunching in the world is of no value in this business if you can’t say, “I recommend XYZ because of this, this, and this” and defend your conclusion. The recommendations we make affect our subscribers’ livelihoods, and we take that seriously. Our analysts would never recommend a company in which they wouldn’t invest their own money. And we do invest in many of the stocks we recommend—after our subscribers get their chance, of course.Dennis: During a recent meeting, you said that part of the analyst’s job is to filter out the noise. Can you explain to our readers what you meant?Chris: Nearly every public company has a marketing team with a hand in its press releases. Management wants the company and the stock presented in the best, most favorable light regardless of whether it’s delivering good, bad, or neutral news. Though technically accurate, what pundits say about a company on MSNBC in a quick sound bite or a press release is often an incomplete story and sometimes misleading. These snippets of information are not a sound basis for investing your money. We do our own due diligence—and a lot of it—to filter through the doublespeak and spin. No matter where we pull information from, we look for what’s left unsaid and why. There’s noise about anything from tulips to technology, from Amazon to Zillow. We teach our analysts to drown out that hype and consider what’s left out: facts uncovered by our own independent research.Dennis: Any final thoughts?Chris: I want to tell your readers about your role in the process. Money Forever crosses all sectors, and since you’ve literally worked with hundreds of businesses and industries, you’ve really helped me train the analysts. I’m going to tell a story about you if that’s OK.Dennis: Sure, go ahead—as long as it has a happy ending.Chris: Our team was discussing one of our current holdings, and one of our analysts mentioned new programs it was implementing to streamline its operation. We quickly learned you had worked with hundreds of different distributors all over the world. You immediately jumped on the new initiative, took the company’s profit and loss statement, and showed us what a significant impact it will have on its bottom line. You helped us cross the bridge from raw information to understanding the financial impact on our portfolio candidates. That’s the final step in the process: understanding what the financial impact will be of a company’s current initiatives and then investing before the MSNBC sound bite comes out.Dennis: Chris, thank you so much for taking the time to help our subscribers understand what takes place behind the curtain. I’m proud to be associated with such a group of dedicated and free-thinking professionals.Chris: Thank you. My pleasure, Dennis; thank you for inviting me. We’re proud that Casey’s contrarian investment philosophy is working just as well for our highly diversified retirement portfolio as it has for speculators across all sectors, and I’m gunning to share all of our highly curated picks with you. It just takes one easy step: sign up for our monthly newsletter without any risk to your pocketbook. You’ll gain immediate access to our entire portfolio, our unique catalog of special reports, and every single back issue of Miller’s Money Forever to boot. If it turns out you’re not as enthused about our newsletter as the thousands of other conservative investors making money right along with us, we’ll refund each and every penny of our special charter price, no questions asked. Forge your own path to a rich and independent retirement by clicking here now.On the Lighter Side The World Cup is down to the knockout round. Belgium knocked out the US team 2-1 after extra time. There’s still a lot of excitement ahead, though: France plays Germany tomorrow, and Brazil plays Colombia. Meanwhile, we’ll be celebrating Independence Day here in the US. And Tuesday was Canada Day up north, as the Canadians on our team reminded me. Happy holidays to all! And finally… I received a cute email last week: A lady was planning a holiday picnic and told her friend she’d asked her Aunt Tillie to bring a big bowl of her famous tuna salad. Her friend responded, “I thought you didn’t like tuna fish?” The lady answered, “Oh, I don’t like it at all, but her salad keeps the flies off the food and punishes any that might chance to land in the bowl.” I hope everyone enjoys great weather and family fun this weekend. Until next week…last_img read more