ICYMI: Governor Wolf’s #PAbudget Facebook Town Hall

first_imgLike Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf By: The Office of Governor Tom Wolf February 22, 2017 ICYMI: Governor Wolf’s #PAbudget Facebook Town Hall   SHARE  TWEET SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Budget News,  The Blog,  Videos Yesterday, Governor Tom Wolf hosted a Facebook Town Hall to answer your questions about his 2017-2018 Budget Proposal and other topics, including Medicaid expansion, REAL ID, and property taxes.The governor responded to questions posted by Facebook users from Altoona, Erie, Philadelphia, Warren, Wilkes-Barre (and more) — and also accepted an invitation by Mayor Anthony Celeste to visit Coraopolis.If you didn’t get to watch the live stream on the governor’s Facebook page, you can watch a replay of the town hall below.Skip to the governor’s answers on topics that matter most to you by clicking on these subjects.Affordable Care Act (1:32)Property Taxes (2:36)REAL ID (4:18)Unemployment Compensation (5:57)Property Taxes (8:18)Rural Health (9:52)Legalizing Marijuana (11:40)Minimum Wage (12:36)Intellectual Disabilities (15:07)Pensions (15:50)Severance Tax (17:48)Libre’s Law/Anti-Animal Cruelty (19:56)Unification of Health and Human Services & Aging Services (20:44)Public Safety (22:28)Substance Abuse Epidemic (24:54)LGBT Equality (28:43)Retirement Incentive (30:03)Veterans (31:16)Online Poker (32:16)To learn more about the governor’s budget proposal, you can visit the Governor’s Executive 2017-2018 Budget web page.last_img read more

Rental vacancies tighten across much of Queensland: REIQ

first_imgVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:06Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:06 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHelp with buying your first home 01:07Brisbane’s rental market has recorded its lowest vacancy rate in 11 years, and has re-entered the “tight range” for the first time in three quarters.That is according to the latest REIQ Rental Vacancy Report, which found vacancy rates have shrunk to 1.6 per cent. a tightening of 1.2 per cent since the June quarter.“The Brisbane LGA market has re-entered the tight range after remaining in the healthy range for the previous three consecutive quarters,” the report found.“Redland and Logan Cities reported the tightest vacancy rates of 1.5 per cent each, with rents holding steady year-on-year for three-bedroom houses.“Moreton Bay vacancies rose slightly over the quarter however the overall vacancy rate remained within the tight range at 1.7 per cent, while rents increased $10 per week for three-bedroom houses from September 2018.“Ipswich City held steady from the June quarter with a healthy vacancy rate of 2.9 per cent and median rents increasing by 1.6 per cent for three-bedroom houses year on year.” MORE NEWS: How joining forces could help you buy a home 8 Long St West, Graceville is listed for $2500 a week … … but nearby, this house at 7 White St, also in Graceville, is $600 a weekThe Greater Brisbane market also reported its lowest vacancy rate in over a decade at 1.7 per cent, 0.7 per cent lower than the previous quarter and 0.5 per cent lower than the same quarter in 2018.On the Gold Coast, vacancies remained stable across the quarter with an oversupply of rental stock as new developments continue to spring up in the region causing rents to edge down. “The reported median rent for three-bedroom houses in the June quarter was down 1 per cent year-on-year, while rent for three-bedroom townhouses was up 2.4 per cent,” the report revealed. This sprawling estate at 59 Haven Road, Pullenvale, could be yours for $1500 a weekOn the Sunshine Coast, rental market vacancies increased marginally by 0.3 per cent, placing the region within the healthy range, while on the Fraser Coast, rental markets remained tight for the quarter, in line with the previous two years, according to the report.In the regions, Cairns vacancies were at an historical record low for the region, reporting 0.9 per cent for the quarter.While in Toowoomba, a tightening of vacancy levels to 1.1 per cent is being heralded as “great news for investors”, with the garden city recording the lowest vacancy rates of all of the major regional areas. An aerial shot of Townsville during the February floods (AAP Image/Dave Acree)In Townsville, which was devastated by flooding earlier this year, vacancy rates remain in the healthy range at 3.2 per cent, while the improving mining sector has seen Mackay vacancies remain in the tight range, albeit increasing marginally by 0.3 per cent over the quarter.“Property managers have reported an increase in residents due to a rise in employment opportunities, contributing to the region’s economy,” the report said. While 24 Glenmorgan St at Keperra is listed for $460 a weekVacancy rates also tightened to 2 per cent in the nearby Whitsundays region.But in Bundaberg and Rockhamptoon, rental vacancies weakened, with Bundaberg recording a vacancy rate of 2.6 per cent, pushing it back in to the healthy range.Rental vacancies in Rockhampton increased to 3.6 per cent, placing the region within the weak range for the first time since March 2018.*** TOWN – VACANCY RATE SEP 2019/VACANCY RATE JUNE 2019 Greater Brisbane: 1.7%; 2.4% (The last time the Greater Brisbane vacancy rate was this low was September 2008) Brisbane LGA: 1.6%; 2.8% (The last time the Brisbane LGA vacancy rate was this low was September 2008) Brisbane Inner: 1.9%; 3.2% Brisbane Middle: 1.3%; 2.5% Brisbane Outer: 1.9%; 2% Ipswich: 2.9%; 2.9%More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus11 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market11 hours ago Logan: 1.5%; 2.4% Moreton Bay: 1.7%; 1.4% Caboolture: 1.2%; 1% Pine Rivers: 1.8%; 1.7% Redcliffe: 2.8%; 1.8% Redland: 1.5%; 1.6% Gold Coast: 3%; 2.8% Sunshine Coast SD: 2.6%; 2.3% Noosa: 4.4%; 2% Fraser Coast: 1.3%; 1% Hervey Bay: 1.2%; 1.4% Cairns: 0.9%; 2.3% Gladstone: 1.8%; 3.1% Mackay: 1.7%; 1.5% Rockhampton: 3.6%; 1.5% Toowoomba: 1.1%; 1.6% Townsville: 3.2%; 2.2% (Source: REIQ Residential Rental Survey September 2019) This is what a $1.5m reno looks like Worst over for Brisbane housinglast_img read more

Alumni develop app to increase access, convenience of medical care

first_imgTwo USC alumni developed the app Heal with the intent of making health care more convenient.Launched in 2014, Heal was founded by Renee Dua and Greg Drobnick. Their goal was to utilize locational technology to deliver medical specialists to customers.Urgently caring · Renee Dua (right), founder of Heal, thought of the app after her son had to wait eight hours before being attended to. | Photo courtesy of Alexandra TroyDua, the chief medical officer at Heal, participated in a fellowship at USC in 2003, with a focus on nephrology, the study of kidneys and hypertension. She also co-founded the application with her husband, and Drobnick, a USC graduate, later joined Heal as its external vice president of strategic initiatives.As former students, the two recognized the lack of access to medical resources for students, and Dua aimed to set Heal apart from other medical options through availability and convenience in its services.“Student health services [aren’t] necessarily open on nights or weekends [at suitable hours],” Dua said. “[Heal is] open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.”Currently available in populated areas of California, including Los Angeles County, Long Beach, Orange County, San Diego and the San Francisco Bay Area, Heal was envisioned to be a new system for health care, Dua said, with doctors available 365 days a year.“It is the house call,” Dua said. “A patient can use an app to schedule a visit with a doctor as his or her personal location. It’s an essential change in the delivery of health care. Usually, you need to go to the doctor. What we’re doing is making that different. The doctor comes to you.”The original idea behind Heal came from Dua, after she experienced a scare with her son’s pediatrician, who told her to rush her toddler to the emergency room after he developed a rash. Dua was told her son would be fine,  but only after an eight-hour wait.The increasing wait times to see doctors, Drobnick said, creates a need for services like Heal. Doctor wait times in 15 metropolitan markets are an average of 24 days in length, a 30 percent increase from 2014, according to a study by Merritt Hawkins.“At the push of a button, you can have an excellent doctor at your dorm, your sorority or fraternity house, your apartment — wherever it is you are,” Drobnick said. “Our promise to students is that we will arrive in under two hours.” As goods and services are increasingly delivered, Drobnick recognized Heal as an innovative use of technology in a field that desperately needs it. “We set out to create a service that would help streamline a lot and use great technologies … to make that process of seeing a doctor easier,” Drobnick said. Drobnick also highlighted the utility of Heal for out-of-state or international students.“The most important thing is that [students] need access to health care just like everybody else does, and you can use [Heal] to see a doctor for almost any reason, [except emergencies],” Dua said.last_img read more

St Patrick’s Day tragedy as young Donegal teacher killed in Dubai

first_imgA young Donegal teacher has been killed following a tragic accident in Dubai.The young teachers, who was in his late 20s, fell from a balcony.The young man, who travelled abroad to teach, is originally from the Mountcharles area. The man’s family have been made aware of the tragedy.The Irish embassy in Dubai is now liaising with the family and arrangements are being made to fly his remains home.A full investigation into the circumstances surrounding the tragedy has been launched by local police.His name has not yet been officially released. St Patrick’s Day tragedy as young Donegal teacher killed in Dubai was last modified: March 18th, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:deathdonegalDubaifallTEACHERlast_img read more