Lecture examines role of sociology

first_imgJocelyn Viterna, associate professor of sociology at Harvard University, delivered a lecture on the interdisciplinary field of development, sponsored by the Kellogg Institute on Tuesday afternoon. She spoke about the history and “identity crisis” of the field and on how a renewed interest in the field is allowing development to once again gain prominence in sociology. “At the close of World War II, everybody was asking these questions: Why are some countries poorer than others and what can be done to raise the standards of living for everyone?” Viterna said. “Answering these questions was thought to be necessary by both scholars of academic institutions as well as by politicians.” Viterna said the dependency and world system theory started losing credit during the 1980s, causing many sociologists in that field to become less welcoming to interdisciplinary work and research. A lot of people who were researching related disciplines described themselves as working with another subfield. “Development sociology had a sort of identity crisis within its own discipline,” Viterna said. “Sociologists like to complain that we have practically zero presence in a lot of development institutions, but I think sociologists have to own up to the fact that although we have very important things to say, we didn’t exactly make ourselves easy to find.” The discrediting of the dependency and world system theory also gave way to what some scholars call “the new consensus.”“‘The new consensus’ is that there’s not a grand new theory, there’s not a grand new explanation of ‘what is development,’” she said. “Now what we’re finding is there is consistent relevance of certain factors — these are these are institutions, social divisions human capital and targeted interventions affected.”“The new consensus” is multidisciplinary, but, according to Viterna, it draws heavily from sociological concepts, such as institutions, mobilization and transnationalism. “If you look at the scholarship on institutes and sociology, institutions themselves are fundamentally cultural,” she said. “But the idea of institutions is that they are these durable structures of knowledge. They embody norms and practices and because we have these institutions that reduce the uncertainty of human interaction and problems of coordination.”Viterna also said many scholars are concerned with how the mobilization of resources function, specifically with how they encourage competition between developing areas and are used by institutions to coerce participation. She mentioned one agency that would only provide resources if enough women held positions on a local council. “There’s this idea that we’re empowering women by ensuring that 50 percent of the positions are filled by women, but we have to acknowledge that this is coerced participation and we don’t know what the consequences of that are,” she said. “Coerced participants are never as ideologically committed as those who do it for more intellectual, more philosophical reasons.” Tags: Jocelyn Viterna, Kellogg Institue, sociologylast_img read more

Largest Conventional Geared Bulker in Canada Now Operates for CSL

first_imgEarlier this year, Montreal-based shipping company Canada Steamship Lines (CSL) welcomed to its fleet MV Ferbec, a conventional geared bulk carrier equipped with four cranes and grabs, which is now fully operational in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence.The vessel, which previously operated in CSL’s Australian fleet as CSL Melbourne, became the largest vessel of its type in the Canadian domestic shipping market.Upon arrival in Québec City on May 13, 2017, the 49,502 dwt vessel underwent modifications to adapt to its new operating environment.Ferbec is now operating under Canadian flag in the Havre St-Pierre to Sorel corridor for Rio Tinto.Built at Nantong COSCO KHI shipyard in China in 2002, the Handymax bulker features a length of 188 meters and a width of 31 meters.“It is by design and with great pride that we revived the name Ferbec for this vessel. Like the original Ferbec – a 56,000 dwt ocean bulk carrier – the new Ferbec is plying the same trades along the same Saint Lawrence routes… Unfortunately, just like its predecessor, the new Ferbec will never be seen on the Great Lakes. Built as an ocean-going vessel, its hull is too wide for the locks of the St. Lawrence Seaway,” Louis Martel, President and CEO of The CSL Group, commented.The arrival of Ferbec in the Canadian fleet is part of CSL’s fleet optimization and capacity management program, which has seen the introduction of six new Trillium Class vessels to the Canadian fleet and the retirement of older, less efficient ships, including most recently the 33,197 dwt bulk carrier, Pineglen.Canada Steamship Lines, a division of the CSL Group, currently operates a fleet of 18 vessels, according to the company’s website.last_img read more

Badgers hope to continue climb up Big Ten ladder

first_imgJared Berggren has an average of 10.6 points per game with a season total of 234 points, second on the Badgers, behind offensive star Jordan Taylor.[/media-credit]Where the Wisconsin men’s basketball team once peered up from near the bottom of the Big Ten standings, it now finds itself looking down on most of its peers after just three weeks’ time.The Badgers (17-5 overall) went from 1-3 in conference play to a 6-3 mark that leaves them tied for third place with Michigan and just one game outside first-place Ohio State.No. 20 Wisconsin has had the luxury of four full days of rest after pulling off a well-played 57-50 upset over then-No. 16 Indiana at the Kohl Center last Thursday.Mix that with a 3-1 conference road record, and don’t be surprised if you find a little spring in the step of Badger players as they prepare to meet with Penn State (10-12, 2-7) Tuesday.“We’re sitting pretty good,” guard Josh Gasser said. “We had a couple days off after the big win to kind of reenergize ourselves, rest our bodies a little bit.“We got a lot of time to regroup and stuff, and we know we have a big stretch coming up with traveling to Penn State and Ohio State later in the week. We just like where we’re at right now.”The Nittany Lions may find themselves at the very bottom of the Big Ten standings, but in what may be the nation’s deepest conference, a loss can emerge from anywhere. Both of Penn State’s two victories in the league came against teams with winning records, while one of them – Illinois – has consistently been ranked.Fans of either team may cringe at the thought of UW and PSU matching up again after the last time they met – in the second round of the Big Ten Tournament last year, the two teams battled it out in a game where the final tally read more like a halftime score.Penn State shot 33.3 percent from the field while Wisconsin managed 29.4 in a 36-34 decision.But much has changed for PSU’s men’s basketball team since. The Nittany Lions introduced a new head coach, Patrick Chambers, in the offseason and waved goodbye to four senior starters.The Badgers, meanwhile, also graduated three starters themselves.“They have pretty much a completely different team; they had a lot of seniors last year so they have a lot new faces now. We have some new faces as well,” center Jared Berggren said.But the lone PSU starting returnee just happens to be one of the Big Ten’s most impressive guards. Junior Tim Frazier – at 6-foot-1, 170 pounds – is second in the conference with 19 points per game in league play and first with 5.1 assists.His numbers have made quite a leap from last year, when he started 33 games and averaged 6.3 points per game.UW guard Jordan Taylor and associate head coach Greg Gard both said one reason for Frazier’s leap in production has to do with the fact that last year he was a sophomore starting along with four seniors, and the burden of scoring was placed more heavily on his teammates.With so much experience leaving, Gard believes that, in a way, Frazier had no choice but to step in and take charge. Either way, Gard praised Frazier’s development and nearly called him the conference’s most improved player.“They lost a lot, so [Frazier] had to take a jump or he has to stand out because he’s one of the few returning,” Gard said. “But … I don’t know if there’s anybody in the league that’s made the jump he has in what he’s added to his game.“He’s made himself a better shooter. Very similar to Jordan, when he came in, his shooting was not – you know, you’d like to have him shoot it from out there – and he was just a driver, just a penetrator. Now he’s added [shooting] to his game.”In all likelihood, it will be Gasser who will be assigned to defend Frazier Tuesday, as he did last season as well.But Gasser has already had success against some of the Big Ten’s best. More recently, against Illinois Jan. 22, he was primarily responsible for Brandon Paul, now currently the only person averaging more points per game (20) in Big Ten games than Frazier.Paul had a forgetful game, scoring 10 points on 3-of-10 shooting.But even last year, as a sophomore that didn’t pose much of a scoring threat, Frazier made so much of an impression on Gasser that he now calls the PSU guard one of the three toughest foes he’s ever had to defend.“He’s up there, top three for sure,” he said.last_img read more