Delta’s new flight museum

first_imgMuseums, the best of them, tell a story. And the story the new Delta Flight Museum tells is dramatic. Tracing the history of one airline, the 68,000 square-foot facility, located on the northern reaches of Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport, manages to illuminate – in meticulous detail – the history of the airline industry as a whole. It does that by looking at Delta’s legacy, the constituent carriers that coalesced to form a global powerhouse. Northwest, Northeast, Western and Pan Am are all represented, as are other smaller airlines.The non-profit museum (there’s an admission fee) unfolds the saga via interactive information kiosks and assorted airline artifacts, the most compelling of which is a squadron of actual airliners. Out front Delta’s parked a 757-200, and a DC-9-50, both painted in the carrier’s classic “widget” livery. But it’s inside hangars One and Two respectively that the real show plays out.Enter the museum and take an immediate right turn. The first thing that catches your eye is an immaculately restored DC-3 proplliner – Ship 41, tail number NC2834. Take a while to drink in the classic design of the airplane. It’s polished bare-metal reflects the rays of sunlight that filter in the expansive hangar bay.Up ahead is a five-passenger, 90 mph Travel Air – the craft that launched Delta’s first passenger service between Dallas and Jackson, Mississippi. The Propeller Age artifacts arrayed in Hangar One include a toy Western Air Express bi-plane for the kids to play in. This AirlineRatings’ author’s grandchildren were fascinated by it. It was a tough to pry them away. They oohed and aahed and giggled and I explained to them how airplanes fly.Over along the far wall of Hangar One is a visual playground for adult aviation enthusiasts: early airline schedules from the carriers with which Delta merged, route maps that etch the carrier’s first east/west routes across the American South, cotton balls and chewing gum issued to flyers of an earlier era to muffle the sound of the piston engine and equalize pressure on their ears.Hangar Two houses the star of the show: a Boeing 767-200, The Spirit of Delta. Employees purchased the airplane for the carrier by raising $30 million.Enter the ship and grab a seat in first class. No charge for the upgrade. Peak inside the cockpit or head to the tail, along the way taking in displays of pilot and flight attendant uniforms of the early jet age.Down below, on the ground floor, get a preflight checklist and perform a walk around inspection of the massive seven-six, the way the first officer (co-pilot) does. A pamphlet lays out your beneath-the belly route, explaining each step in layman’s terms. By the time you reach the tail and crane your neck up at the elevators (which make the aircraft ascend and descend) you’ll have a decent idea of the fundamentals of flight.If the star of the show is the 767, the sexiest exhibit is the Boeing 737-200 flight simulator. The museum says it’s the only real full-motion flight “sim” open to the public in the United States. Take a look inside at no extra charge. “Fly” the seven-three for 45 minutes for US$395. You’ll have to call ahead for reservations.While the Delta Flight Museum isn’t far from Delta headquarters, it’s not immediately adjacent to the mid-field terminal complex of the world’s busiest airport. If you’re passing through ATL and want to see it best bet is to grab a cab.Find out more about the museum by going to the Web site at www.deltamuseum.org . Contact them via e-mail at museum.delta@delta.com. The phone number is 1-404-715-7886.The Delta Flight Museum won’t be mistaken for Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. But what it does, it does exceptionally well. If you’ve got a long layover in Atlanta you could spend your precious time in far less fascinating fashion.last_img read more

Pickwick Place connects community with agriculture

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Every small town has its landmarks, whether it’s the historic buildings in the town square, a unique house, or the rundown barn on the side of the road. They stand the test of time and become part of the landscape, providing roots for the community through decades of progress.The long brick barns of Pickwick Farms have become a landmark in the Bucyrus community. The history runs deep with beginnings in dairy cattle and a claim to fame as the Standardbred horse farm where artificial insemination gained significant momentum. But the horses left in the 70s and the barns recently hit a tipping point — they either needed rejuvenated, or they needed to go.Fortunately, local 16-year-old, Ethan Stuckey had a vision and his parents, Kent and Laura Stuckey, had the faith that they could make it happen. Now, after building on Ethan’s vision, the Stuckeys are working alongside two other local families — Greg and Rose Hartschuch, and Chris and Andrea Schimpf — to reclaim the barns and put The Pickwick Place back on the map as a farm market, event center, and a destination to connect with agriculture. Working as a team — or being part of the “farm-ily” as they like to say — combines the talents of each individual to make the venture more successful as a whole.“Ethan wanted to raise produce and we were looking for a spot to set it up, so we purchased this and decided to renovate it,” Kent said. “I grew up in the produce business; in Indiana my dad had about 5,000 apple trees and 30 acres of u-pick strawberries at one point. Ethan really encouraged me to purchase this property and go ahead with it.”While this year’s produce including bell peppers, broccoli, butternut squash, cabbage, cantaloupe, cucumbers, green beans, onions, potatoes, sweet corn, tomatoes, watermelon, and zucchini is being sold at the roadside stand, the south barn is being renovated to house the full farm market where they hope to include more local products.“What we want to do is showcase local people. Right now we have local maple syrup and honey. We want to have high quality, reasonably priced, local products. We want to showcase the community and make it a showplace for the community,” Kent said. “It’s also about transparency and knowing where your food comes from. That’s a theme Rose has built Acres of Adventure around — educating the public about what happens on the farm and why it happens. We want to carry that through on the retail side.”Acres of Adventure will find its home in the north barn with games and activities to educate students and the public about farming. Featuring a petting zoo and corn maze, this portion of Pickwick is an expansion of what the Hartschuhs were already doing on their own farm. Moving to Pickwick offers new opportunity and a location that is easier to find.“When I stopped teaching agriculture I knew I still wanted to be involved in education somehow, so we started a fall field trip program. It has really taken off over the last few years and we look forward to growing that here,” Rose said. “Any time that people can get out and see and touch and feel — really feel connected to farming — they’ll leave with a much better impression.”The building will provide a space for the hands-on learning activities as well as a new classroom space to better facilitate field trips and groups. Rose is also doing much of the marketing and outreach for the new venture and has been pleasantly surprised by the interest in the event space which will be housed in the center barn. The space is slated to open for use on June 1, 2016, and many dates have already been booked for next year with some interest for dates in 2017.The Loft at Pickwick Place features a rustic reception hall on the second floor of the barn that can seat up to 240 people. Renovations in this building will include dressing rooms for bridal parties and a 30-foot addition on one end for bathrooms, a prep kitchen, elevator and second stairway — one of the many things needed to bring the buildings into compliance.“We are in city limits here, so codes and ordinances dictate a lot of what we do. There are some hurdles we’re working around — a lot of inspections and permits — but we have some great people guiding us through the process. We have contractors from here in Bucyrus working with us, we’ve had engineers evaluate the buildings and we’re working with an architect to design the improvements,” Rose said.The interest in the event space is encouraging, but what might mean a little more to the crew is the general outpouring of support from their community. Within a week from creating a page for The Pickwick Place on Facebook, they received more than 1,000 likes and that continues to grow.“If the barns were going to be saved, something needed to be done. And the community has just jumped on board with that. They are excited to see something happening here,” Rose said. “With the local food movement picking up, people really have a new found interest in knowing where their food comes from. This is a way that we can take what we’re doing already on our farms to the next level and connect with the consumers more directly. They might not drive out to the farm and stop in, but they will stop here and start a conversation.”And when people are stopping in, it’s Chris Schimpf who may be the most excited. Chris and Andrea Schimpf bring customer relations expertise and farm market experience to the table, having spent 12 years growing and selling fresh cut flowers at Columbus markets. While the business was a success, they gave it up a few years ago as they simply didn’t have the time. The venture at Pickwick is much closer and gives them the opportunity to be involved locally.“We did about two or three acres of cut flowers working in the Columbus markets. It was oriental lilies, gladiolas, sunflowers, azaleas and some others,” said Chris Schimpf. “I learned a lot about customer service at the farm markets. This is a little different than Columbus, but you still have the basics. I enjoy interacting with all the customers. To me, that’s the exciting part. I think one unique thing about Pickwick is that, especially in Bucyrus, a lot of landmarks are coming down. We’re preserving this one in a very productive fashion. It’s not just something they’re going to see and take a picture of; they’ll be able to experience it.”The farm market it also providing an experience for Ethan Stuckey  — a supervised agricultural experience (SAE), to be exact. Ethan has taken on the role of managing the produce at Pickwick as part of his SAE project in the FFA program at Wynford High School, where he also serves as chapter president.“I grew up on a dairy farm so I’ve always worked. I sort of got involved in sports, but felt more productive on the farm,” Ethan said. “At times, the dairy can be frustrating for me, but working with crops really appealed to me. I always enjoyed going to my grandparents’ farm in Indiana, then one of my brothers threw out the idea of planting an orchard and it stuck with me.”Ethan has jumped right in to the produce industry. After attending a few conferences in Ohio and Michigan this year and gleaning knowledge from his grandfather, Ethan knows what practices he wants to use.“My biggest goal is to use integrated pest management and focus on reduced risk pesticides. Next year, I’ll transition into some no-till,” Ethan said. “The hardest part has been learning which weeds are which so I can properly spray for them and trying to stay ahead of diseases. It’s easier to control diseases through prevention.”The farm market barn is the longest building at Pickwick, nearing 200 feet in length. All three of the steel framed, brick barns are receiving a facelift with new windows, roofs and floors.In addition, many berries have been planted for u-pick patches next year. Ethan has two acres of trees ordered to plant in upcoming years and with the Stuckeys and Hartschuhs operating dairy farms, ice cream has been mentioned.With optimism from the Pickwick “farm-ily” and the feedback from the community it seems evident that this is only the beginning. Wherever the adventure leads, customers and fans can follow along with The Pickwick Place on Facebook or learn more about the families and the business at www.thepickwickplace.com.last_img read more

Highlights and Resources from The Power of Family Mealtimes: Strategies to Promote Health and Wellbeing

first_imgby Robin Allen MSPH, RDN, LDNWhen my children were growing up have the family together for mealtimes was important not always possible.  My husband worked odd hours frequently when he was not there until the kids were in bed.  So I confess to succumbing to faster, more convenience foods.  Then as they grew up activities started interfering and we found ourselves at a drive through between work, cross country, cheerleading, school plays, music lessons, gymnastics, ice skating etc.  Sometimes nutrition and family meals took a back seat to a busy schedule.  I wish I had appreciated the importance of making time for family meals.The following are some key take a ways and resources shared in the webinar.At the beginning of the webinar we asked the participants the following question.  Below are the answers given by the participants. I can certainly relate to all of them!What do you consider the major barriers to sharing meals for contemporary families?Time, media, busy lifestyles, picky eaters, evening activities, many younger families to not know how to cook, no cooking skills, children’s schedules, sports, clubs, lack of cooking skills, conflicting schedules, unplugging, working mom, adult schedules, children are over-involved and there is no time left for family, fast food is easy, money, working parents, home cooking is too hard, too much time too costly,The key elements for Healthy MealtimesPlanning aheadPositive CommunicationReduce Noise and DistractionFlexible enough to meet demands of busy family lifeNotes from the webinar to help with family mealtimes:Create a routine, with time, place predictability, role for all, order repetition, flexibility, sense of control and efficacy.Frequently mealtimes are filled with chaos, variable times, random settings, unpredictable, shifting roles, lack of order, feeling out of control, stress and strain, sense of urgency, background noise.Mealtime FAQs:Most shared family mealtimes last between 18-20 minutes63% of family members eat dinner together “frequently” or “always”Families with children under 18 eat dinner together “frequently” or “always” 77% of the time86% of parents agreed that dinnertime was the best time for family members to get together and talk, next best place is in the car.Primary barriers to sharing meals in families with preschool-aged children:Problematic BehaviorSibling FightsPicky EatingChild TantrumsScheduling DifficultiesParent WorkSupport from Partner46% of families interviewed in a CDC report stated they had a television where they ate.Parents of young children report using television during mealtimes as a way to avoid conflict.Integrated AdvertisingAdvergamesSocial MediaAdolescents equate quality of information with quantity (e.g., viral videos)Young children and adolescents equate nutrition quality with positive emotions evoked during advergames.Resources for Families or Providers:Ann Hall MRE, RDN, LDN Child Nutrition Programs, NETTA Division shared the following USDA resources after the webinar:MyPlate, MyWins , at www.choosemyplate.gov/myplate-mywins  is all about finding a healthy eating style that works for your family and fits with your everyday life. The MyPlate icon is a reminder to make healthy choices from each of the five food groups, and there are many small changes that add up to big success over time. On the site you’ll find fun, practical tips and tools that have worked for other families and fun food activities to do with kids, along with information on making family mealtimes fun.Our Team Nutrition website has information for families as well as child care centers and schools on feeding children at www.fns.usda.gov/tn/team-nutrition. Team Nutrition provides MyPlate materials that are developed specifically for kids and their parents/caregivers. Evidenced-based curricula that educators can use to integrate MyPlate lessons into core educational subjects, such as Math, English Language Arts, and Science is also available.Check out FNS’s new mobile app Food Buying Guide. The Food Buying Guide (FBG) is the essential resource for food yield information for all Child Nutrition Programs (CNP). Go to www.fns.usda.gov/tn/food-buying-guide-mobile-app to download the app.Resources shared in the chat:Turn mealtime into “family time” with ideas and tips from the Human Performance Resource Center. www.hprc-online.org/articles/turning-mealtime-into-family-timeCheck out this blog from Dr. Fiese on family mealtimes and why they matter: https://infoaboutkids.org/blog/family-mealtimes-why-do-they-matter/For more resources, check out The Family Dinner Project. “The Family Dinner Project is a growing movement of food, fun and conversation about things that matter. We are a nonprofit organization currently operating from the offices of Project Zero at HarvardUniversity” thefamilydinnerproject.orgThis article from Child Trends provides more research on the importance of family mealtimes: https://www.childtrends.org/indicators/family-mealsThis is a great resource on establishing healthy mealtimes right from the start with babies and toddlers: https://www.zerotothree.org/resources/1941-healthymealtimes-feeding-your-baby-and-toddler-right-from-the-startSome of the research on family mealtimes being beneficial in nutrition and reducing childhood obesity. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3387875/This is a really great resource for those with young children, to help establish a healthy relationship with food and feeding early on to last a lifetime https://healthyeatingresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/her_feeding_guidelines_report_021416-1.pdfEllen Satter https://www.ellynsatterinstitute.org/ The Ellen Satter Institute helps thousands of parents, grandparents, children, teens, adults and health professionals to provide a healthy relationship with food for health and well-being.Bridging Apps reviews food and nutrition apps for kids. https://search.bridgingapps.org/lists/59dc5506-1c62-4244-af7a-399ce3145d97Additional references and resources from the event page https://militaryfamilieslearningnetwork.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Additional-Resources-The-Power-of-Family-Mealtimes-August-21.pdf How do you facilitate family mealtimes with your family or with your clients/patients?  We would love to get your feedback!last_img read more