Graduating Baniqued, Borlain reign in IronKids anew

first_imgBut the reigning champion’s cushion was enough to get him past the finish line by just a millisecond to claim his fourth gold in Cebu.Adrian Thomas Dionisio placed third at 38:58Meanwhile, Tara Borlain extended her dynasty in the girls’ 13-14 category, running away with the crown with a time of 41:34The 14-year-old slowly pulled away from the field, clocking 6:27 in the swim, 20:19 in the bike, before putting an exclamation with her 14:50 time in the run course.Tara Borlain stays on top of the girls! pic.twitter.com/3R3IFf5jsdADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ — Randolph B. Leongson (@RLeongsonINQ) August 4, 2017Nicole Marie Del Rosario was distant second at 45:21, while Marielle Estreba was at third with a 45:46 clocking.Hyonde Keum topped the boys’ 11-12 category as he finished the race in 35:28. Following him are Glendwyn Giles Mariscotes (36:22) and Matthew Justine Hermosa (36:40).Moira Frances Erediano won the girls’ 11-12 category, clocking in 34:25 to lead the field. Sophia Psalm Belican placed second (34:32) and Jeanna Mariel Cañete third (35:03).Beboy Dolen bested the boys’ 9-10 category with his time of 24:29, with John Christian Pabuaya (27:21) and Juan Alessandro Suarez (27:22) chasing him.Kira Ellis remained on top in the girls’ 9-10 category with her 28:16 clocking, outlasting second-placer Alexei Gunhuran (28:41) and third-placer Franchezka Borlain (30:04).Rafael Jopson conquered the boys’ 6-8 category with his time of 17:38, followed by Van Wincy Pagnanawon (18:02) and Ryonde Kum (19:57).Kyle Enialle Toledana paced the girls’ 6-8 category as she clocked 21:18, as she was chased by Eleora Caelle Avanzado (22:50) and Mireille Dee (25:21).Team Cebu protected the home floor as they won the Relay for 10-14 category with their time of 23:24, followed by two teams from TLTG/Omega 1 (24:26) and TLTG/ Omega 2 (25:16). Photo finish for the boys! pic.twitter.com/UTmXTtnQX1— Randolph B. Leongson (@RLeongsonINQ) August 4, 2017FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’ McGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC return 2 PH kids earn slots to Bayern Munich training camp Kawhi Leonard, Clippers rally to beat Pelicans Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next ‘I’m out!’: PewDiePie releases last video before taking break from YouTube 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano Quirino closed in on Baniqued after falling behind by over a minute, making his chase in the run course with a time of 14:18. Juan Francisco Baniqued. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netLAPU-LAPU CITY — Juan Francisco Baniqued and Tara Borlain capped off their careers in the youth circuit and once again topped the 2017 Alaska IronKids on Saturday morning at Shangri-La Mactan here.Baniqued edged Joseff Miguel Quirino in a photo finish in the boys’ 13-14 division as the two clocked an identical 38:50 to finish the swim-bike-run course.ADVERTISEMENT OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Indian national gunned down in Camarines Sur LeBron James scores 31 points, Lakers beat Rockets End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

Jones admits to doping

first_imgTRACK AND FIELD: Facing legal charges, U.S. sprinter reportedly comes clean about using BALCO steroid cream. By Bob Baum THE ASSOCIATED PRESS For years, Marion Jones angrily denied she was a drug cheat, swearing she was clean and daring anyone to prove otherwise. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREChargers go winless in AFC West with season-ending loss in Kansas CitySeven years after her triumphs at the 2000 Olympics, the three-time gold medalist has admitted in a recent letter to family and close friends that she used steroids before the Sydney Games, The Washington Post reported Thursday. She’s scheduled to appear in U.S. District Court in White Plains, N.Y., today to plead guilty to charges in connection with her steroid use, a federal law enforcement source told The Associated Press. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing, and would not provide specific details about the plea. “I want to apologize for all of this,” the Post reported Jones saying in her letter, quoting a person who received a copy and read it to the paper. “I am sorry for disappointing you all in so many ways.” Jones said in her letter that she faced up to six months in jail and would be sentenced in three months, according to the newspaper. The admission also could cost Jones the five medals she won in Sydney, where she was the most celebrated female athlete of the Games. She didn’t win the five golds she wanted, but she came away with three and two bronzes, and her bright smile and charming personality made her a star. The triple gold medalist in Sydney said she took “the clear” for two years, beginning in 1999, and that she got it from former coach Trevor Graham, who told her it was flaxseed oil, the newspaper reported. “The clear” is a performance-enhancing drug linked to BALCO, the lab at the center of the steroids scandal in professional sports. Home run king Barry Bonds, New York Yankees slugger Jason Giambi and Detroit Tigers outfielder Gary Sheffield all have been linked to the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative and were among more than two dozen athletes who testified before a federal grand jury in 2003. Until now, Jones had denied doping, even suing BALCO founder Victor Conte in 2004 for $25 million. Conte repeatedly accused Jones of using performance-enhancing drugs and said he watched her inject herself. “It cost me a lot of money to defend myself,” Conte said Thursday. “But I told the truth then, and I’m telling it now.” In her letter, Jones said she didn’t realize she’d used performance-enhancing drugs until she stopped training with Graham at the end of 2002. She said she lied when federal agents questioned her in 2003, panicking when they presented her with a sample of “the clear,” which she recognized as the substance Graham had given her. “It’s funky, because you wanted to believe she was clean,” said Jon Drummond, a gold medalist in the 400 relay in Sydney. “It’s like that old saying, `Cheaters never win.’ So no matter how glorious or glamorous things look, you’ll get caught and pay a price for it. “It caught me by total surprise,” he added. “It’s a shock. I thought it was a closed case. It doesn’t help track and field at all, except maybe by letting the world know, people always get to the bottom of things.” Jones’ career has been tarnished the last several years by doping allegations against her. In August 2006, a urine sample tested positive for EPO, but Jones was cleared when a backup sample tested negative. She also was among the athletes who testified before a BALCO grand jury in 2003. Her former boyfriend, Tim Montgomery, also testified, and was given a two-year ban for doping in late 2005. Michelle Collins and Justin Gatlin, who also trained with Graham, were banned for doping violations, too. Graham has a Nov. 26 trial date after being indicted in the BALCO case last November on three counts of lying to federal agents. Graham, who has pleaded not guilty, helped launch the government’s steroid probe in 2003 when he mailed a vial of “the clear” – previously undetectable – to the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. USA Track & Field was not aware of Jones’ letter nor any pending legal action, CEO Craig Masback said. “Anything that exposes the truth about drug use in sport is good for ensuring the integrity of sport,” Masback said. “Any use of performance-en- hancing substances is a tragedy for the athlete, their teammates, friends, family and the sport.” Darryl Seibel, spokesman for the U.S. Olympic Committee, declined comment on whether Jones would lose her medals until legal proceedings are completed. “If these reports are true,” Seibel said, “it is an admission of responsibility from an athlete who owed her sport much better.” The Post also reported that, in her letter, Jones said she lied about a $25,000 check given to her by Montgomery, who pleaded guilty in New York in April as part of a criminal scheme to cash millions of dollars worth of stolen or forged checks. He has yet to be sentenced.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. 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