Maharashtra continues to dole out sops to struggling real estate sector

first_imgAs part of the series of concessions being granted to the real estate sector, which is facing a credit crunch, the State government aims to help relax the ban on construction in the buffer zone around flamingo sanctuaries in Mumbai and Thane.Ahead of the Assembly polls, the State government is pushing the Union Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC) to notify Eco Sensitive Zones (ESZs) around the sanctuaries. The notification will help real estate developers seek a relief from the ban imposed by the apex court on construction within the buffer zone. Real estate bodies have submitted an affidavit to the courts on the need to lift the ban for the benefit of the industry. ‘Fast-track proposal’According to the Supreme Court directive dated December 11, 2018, unless the State government notifies ESZs, a 10-km buffer has to be marked from the boundaries of flamingo sanctuaries. As per the directive, construction will be banned within or around the buffer zone. Real estate representatives have demanded the proposal to declare the sanctuaries as ESZs be put on the fast track. An environment department official said, “We have done our bit to mark out the ESZs and forwarded the proposals to the (MoEFCC) from the Mangrove Cell of the Maharashtra Forest Department. The developers have moved the courts seeking relief from the ban, which will become easier once ESZs are marked.”In the recent past, the government has relaxed a variety of environmental permissions while lifting cess and premium charges on projects to support the real estate sector. Twelve demands made by industry associations have been approved, including the submission of development proposals simultaneously to the planning authority and the Maharashtra Coastal Zone Management Authority (MCZMA). According to the existing practice, proposals in Coastal Regulation Zone (2) area are submitted first to the planning authority and later to the MCZMA. The government has decided to exempt real estate projects from an online system, which monitors commercial, information technology and green building projects. The Project Proponent (PP) will no longer be made responsible for operation and maintenance of pollution control systems in a housing society. Maharashtra Pollution Control Board regulations mandate that the PP be held responsible for five years for systems installed after the formation of a housing society in a residential project.Last week, Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis had approved a slew of fiscal concessions to the struggling construction sector, setting the State exchequer back by ₹800 crore. Among the measures were the removal of development cess on the additional floor space index component. The premium charged in case of residential projects was reduced to 35% from 50%, while the commercial charges in the category were brought down to 40% from 60%. The premiums on construction of information technology parks, redevelopment of Maharashtra Housing Area Development Authority structures too was reduced by 50%, officials said.last_img read more

NCAA postpones Tuesday’s games

first_imgLyceum head coach Topex Robinson. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netThe NCAA has postponed its Tuesday’s games due to heavy rains brought about by tropical storm “Isang.”Juniors and seniors games between St. Benilde and Arellano; Perpetual and Emilio Aguinaldo; and league-leader Lyceum and Mapua were once again affected by the bad weather.ADVERTISEMENT Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul View comments MOST READ Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo These were the same set of games that were postponed last July 28 due to tropical storm “Gorio.”The Pirates would have had a chance to complete a first-round sweep Tuesday against the Cardinals.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingNo new schedule of the games has been announced.center_img Triathletes Huelgas, Mangrobang snare gold; Chicano, Adorna take silver LATEST STORIES Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’last_img read more

Tories demand government explain how much a carbon price will cost Canadians

first_imgOTTAWA – Conservative finance critic Pierre Poilievre will ask the House of Commons this week to force the government to show Canadians how much more they can expect to pay for gas, heat and groceries once every Canadian will be charged a $50 per tonne carbon tax.Poilievre says he knows the government has the information because access to information requests he filed produced a finance department memo that says there is an analysis of the potential impact of a carbon price, based on household consumption data across different income levels.However, he says the actual data from the analysis is blacked out.Poilievre says he has given notice of the intention to file a motion demanding the government table documents in the House that show how much a $50 per tonne carbon price will cost a median income Canadian family.The federal government requires every province to put a price on carbon by the start of next year or it will impose one itself. Legal authority to do so is laid out in the government’s budget implementation bill currently working its way through Parliament.Poilievre says the carbon price legislation takes up 200 pages of that bill, but nowhere does it say how much it will cost people.“Government cannot tax what Parliament does not approve, but Parliament cannot approve what it does not know,” Poilievre said Sunday. “Right now, Parliament is being kept in the dark.”In refusing to provide the analysis done by the department of finance, the government says it can be withheld because it is either advice to government or information that can possibly harm the Canadian economy.“If the knowledge of the cost of the carbon tax in itself would cause injury to the Canadian economy, then that cost must be even worse than we have imagined,” said Poilievre.He also filed a complaint with the information commissioner, asking her to investigate the government for its refusal to release the information in the access request response. He said Caroline Maynard has agreed and has started looking into the matter.Four provinces already have carbon pricing systems in place, but the federal requirement will mean on January 1, every province has to have a system that applies a price of at least $20 per tonne of carbon emissions. The price has to rise $10 per tonne per year until it reaches $50 per tonne in 2022. At that point, Ottawa will review the system.The documents outlining the proposed federal pricing system, to be used only in provinces that don’t have their own plan, do provide information about what impact the price will have to the cost various types of fuel such as gasoline, natural gas, propane and coal.However, Poilievre says it’s not detailed enough for individual families to understand what it means to them, because the price will not only affect the price at the pump but most of what people buy as the cost to produce and ship products also goes up.Environment Minister Catherine McKenna said Sunday a price on carbon has a low cost and high impact.“We know polluting isn’t free — there is a cost,” said McKenna.She said carbon pricing pushes for innovation to find ways to reduce emissions in order to pay less, and is one of the ways Canada will meet its international commitment to reduce climate-changing emissions.McKenna has also been criticized for not answering questions about how much emissions the carbon price will cut.“We will be releasing more information shortly,” she said Sunday.The Pan Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change estimates 86 million tonnes of emissions will be eliminated in Canada from the measures contained within, but it does not specify how much of that is to come from carbon pricing.last_img read more

APTN Investigates MMIWG – After the stories are told

first_imgHolly MooreAPTN InvestigatesAs the first phase of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) winds down, its future is still uncertain.For her episode “After the stories are told,” APTN Investigates producer Holly Moore travelled to hearings in Yellowknife, Winnipeg and Thunder Bay, Ont. to speak to survivors, families, and advocates.Phase one of the inquiry’s mandate, which was focussed on families and survivors testimony, ended April 20, but they’ve asked for a two-year extension and $50 million in additional money and are awaiting an answer from the federal government.There is, however, growing opposition to an extension amongst allies, advocates, and families including Maggie Cywink, a vocal critic, and MMIWG family member.“To me, it is beyond disrespectable,” she said. “This could have been an amazing experience for families if they hadn’t rushed through to get this done.”Maggie Cywink is a member of “Families for Justice”, a group of more than 20 MMIWG Families who have official standing at the Inquiry. David Moses/APTN NewsSome families and survivors have found healing, according to Marion Buller, the inquiry’s chief commissioner.“There have been a lot of families and survivors who say that getting in and testifying has been a turning point for me,” said Buller.Sandra Lockhart has survived an incredible amount of violence in her life. She came to her Inquiry hearing in Yellowknife with mixed emotions but ultimately found some healing.“It is just the beginning and I am not carrying what I call ‘dirt’ with me,” she said. “I am free of what was holding me down.”However, some have complained there is the lack of aftercare and counselling, for families who may have been traumatized from testifying at the hearings.Anita Ross’ daughter 16- year-old Delaine Copenace drowned in Kenora, Ont. in 2016.Ross drove five hours to Thunder Bay and told her daughter’s story. She says there was little follow up by inquiry staff after her hearing.Anita Ross went to the December 2017 hearing in Thunder Bay to talk about her daughter Delaine Copenace. Photo: Holly Moore/APTN News“The only contact I had was by email and that was about eight weeks later,” she said. “By email? You couldn’t call me and ask me? You should have called me right after but that didn’t happen.”Some grassroots groups like Ontario Native Women’s Association (ONWA) say they are trying to fill in the gaps in aftercare and provide some healing after testimony.“Let’s do what we can to reduce as much harm as we can,” said ONWA Executive Director Cora Lee McGuire Cyrette. “We said this is the inquiry that they are going to have, so let’s concentrate on the fallout, the harm to families. We are concentrating on harm reduction.”OWNA opened its spaces during the inquiry and offered beading, meals and drum groups.“We know people wanted to get away from their trauma, right? So its kind of the flight response so if they are being opened up and triggered where the inquiry is taking place,” she said.Cora Lee McGuire Cyrette is Executive Director of Ontario Native Women’s Association. Photo: Holly Moore/APTN NewsChief commissioner Marion Buller told APTN Investigates that the aftercare options are given to families at the point of intake but the services are not mandatory.“Sometimes families have said thanks but no thanks,” she said.Marion Buller is the chief commissioner of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Photo: APTN NewsRoss said she was surprised that the inquiry staff did not have her daughter’s police report, coroner’s report or any other official paperwork available at her hearing.“All they had was clips from the Internet on stories of her,” she said. “In my position, I think it was a waste of time to drive up there and tell that story. “Without an extension, the inquiry will move to the next phases. Part two and three of the “truth-gathering process” will see commissioners interview decision-makers, politicians and policymakers in the areas of policing and child welfare.The first hearing will take place in Quebec City from May 14- May 17, 2018, but there is no information available on who will attend.See hearing dates here: MMIWG Hearing Dateshmoore@aptn.ca@hollymooreaptnlast_img read more

1105s Ed Tech Magazine Returns to Print After 2 DigitalOnly Years

first_img T.H.E. Journal, 1105 Media’s magazine about K-12 education technology, is doing just that though. The title, which scrapped its print edition in 2012, will debut its new print edition at a related 1105 trade show in late January. Despite marketing leading digital offerings, in a competitive landscape with six other print magazines, T.H.E. Journal’s sales team was short a tool that every other rival had, Allain says. The return of print is paying immediate dividends. The 38-page inaugural issue has a 50-50 ad edit ratio—”significantly higher” than it had been for digital-only editions, according to Christopher Piehler, the magazine’s editor-in-chief. Along with the print relaunch, circulation will double: 50,000 print issues will accompany the 50,000 digital editions currently being sent out. Frequency will be cut from monthly to 7x however, to more closely align with the segment’s active seasons, Allain says. Digital-to-print launches like Allrecipes, POLITICO Magazine and The Pitchfork Review are becoming increasingly common, but it’s rare when a brand that decided to abandon ink and paper returns to it.center_img “When I talk to the connected educators who make up our audience, they say that their computer desktop is more crowded than their literal desktop. For these people, whose job is to grapple constantly with a barrage of emails, texts and tweets, reading something in print can be a way to relax and really focus,” Piehler says. “We did a survey that showed reader interest, but for me the most powerful motivation came when a member of my editorial board said to me, ‘You know, I hate to admit it, but I read the magazine more when it was in print.'”More on this topic 1105 Media to Publish Microsoft’s MSDN, TechNet Magazines Branding Push, Client Needs Spawn New 1105 Media Division 1105 Enterprise Computing Group Launches Marketing Services Division 1105 Media Hires Tech Exec as CEO Digital Editions: Are They About to Catch Fire? Hanley Wood, 1105 Media Start the Year Off with AcquisitionsJust In The Atlantic Names New Global Marketing Head | People on the Move Four More Execs Depart SourceMedia in Latest Restructuring Bonnier Corp. Terminates Editor-in-Chief for Ethics Breach BabyCenter Sold to Ziff Davis Parent J2 Media | News & Notes This Just In: Magazines Are Not TV Networks Editor & Publisher Magazine Sold to Digital Media ConsultantPowered by “When the decision was made to cease the publication in print, it was based on indicators that digital-only strategies were growing in popularity with advertisers,” says 1105’s COO, Henry Allain. “We discovered that may be true in some markets, but clearly not in the K-12 ed-tech space. This segment of the market continues to have a vibrant print offering…We needed to be back as part of the mix.” “In this market segment many agencies and marketers are committed to integrated buys,” he says. “We found ourselves at a disadvantage when we didn’t offer print as one component of the buy…It was a bit frustrating for the sales team to have to continually deal with the question: ‘Where is the print component of this proposal?'”last_img read more

How does complex behavior spontaneously emerge in the brain

first_img Citation: How does complex behavior spontaneously emerge in the brain? (2013, August 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-08-complex-behavior-spontaneously-emerge-brain.html A spatial representation of the background avalanche activity in a circular culture with a 2.5-mm radius and density of 300 neurons per mm. Only the top 1% of the most active connections is shown. Different colors correspond to different neuron communities, according to a community detection algorithm. Credit: Javier G. Orlandi, et al. ©2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited In a new study published in Nature Physics, a team of researchers from Spain has shown that emergence in neuronal networks can be explained as a noise-driven phenomenon that is controlled by the interplay between network topology and intrinsic neuronal dynamics. In this scenario, a randomly fired pulse propagates through the network and is amplified by noise focusing, which the researchers describe as an implosive concentration of spontaneous activity. “From the experimental point of view, we show that in neuronal cultures, the emergence early in the development of collective spontaneous activity is dominated by the presence of activity waves that initiate in specific regions of the culture, in a similar way as it happens in vivo,” lead author Javier G. Orlandi at the University of Barcelona told Phys.org. “And with the help of simulations, we also show that you don’t need any special mechanism to explain this behavior, just the right combination of network structure and dynamics. These waves emerge naturally from the noise focusing effect, in which individual firings propagate and concentrate in specific regions to later generate these activity waves.”The researchers arrived at this explanation by combining high-resolution calcium imaging experiments of rat cortical neurons with simulations. The experiments revealed that bursts of neuronal pulses are controlled by waves that originate at small areas called nucleation sites. Although previous research has hinted at the existence of such waves, this study is the first that provides sufficiently high resolution to measure the wave velocity for the first time. The random nature of the wave initiation from spontaneous neuronal firing also supports the idea that it is a noise-driven phenomenon, in which the waves are later amplified to become global bursts.The view of emergence in neural networks as a noise-driven phenomenon differs from the common view in which the bursts of neuronal pulses are controlled by specific leader neurons assisted by the network architecture. In the noise-driven explanation, the nucleation sites do not actively initiate the firing process, but collect and amplify the firing activity that originated elsewhere.As the researchers explain, understanding the full implications of noise focusing in the brain remains a question for future research.”The mechanism of noise focusing emerges naturally in any system with interconnected integrate-and-fire units (like neurons), so its effect should also be present in the brain,” Orlandi said. “If this effect is important in the brain, or by contrast, if the brain has other mechanisms to counter its effect, is still an open question. It could be that noise focusing is responsible for the generation of waves of activity during development, like in the retina, and that it helps the maturation of specific neuronal pathways.”In the future, the researchers plan to further investigate neuronal activity through more in-depth investigations.”We want to see what happens in more complex neuronal systems, like slices or electrode recordings from anaesthetized animals, and see if we find the same effect in there,” Orlandi said. “We know that activity waves are present in these systems, but we still need to see how these waves form exactly, if it is also due to noise focusing or due to something else. It would also be extremely interesting to check what role noise focusing plays in social networks, for example in rumor spreading.”In this analogy, the points of a rumor’s origins can be compared to the nucleation sites where waves originate, and the spreading of a rumor to the brain’s collective neuronal firing. More information: Javier G. Orlandi, et al. “Noise focusing and the emergence of coherent activity in neuronal cultures.” Nature Physics. DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS2686 Journal information: Nature Physics Coherence activity in neuronal cultures from noise focusingcenter_img Explore further (Phys.org) —The idea of emergence, in which complex behavior spontaneously emerges out of simple interactions, exists in a wide variety of areas, such as economics, the Internet, and urban development. But perhaps the ultimate example of emergence is in the brain, where thousands of randomly firing neurons spontaneously reach a coherent state of collective, periodic firing that underlies all brain functions. Despite significant progress, the mechanisms responsible for the origin and maintenance of spontaneous neuronal activity are still poorly understood. © 2013 Phys.org. All rights reserved. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Flying high

first_imgAakashan is a fusion of Australian and Indian traditional aerial acrobatics arts. The show was developed and directed by Catherine Daniel an Australian physical theater practitioner in collaboration with Indian choreographer Vikram Mohan, Carly Sheppard, an indigenous Australian contemporary and tradition dancer and the Kalakar Trust.Aakashan was presented and performed by young artists who belong to traditional artist families having low- income backgrounds. The show’s daring aerial acrobatics feats performed include the aptly named gazelle split, half angel, mermaid, bow and arrow & sleeping beauty.  All these elements require incredible stamina and endurance to perform. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Speaking on the occasion Sterre Sharma, founder Kalakar Trust said, ‘I am proud that the youngsters in this show showed the strength to succeed in spite of the challenges they have faced every day of their life.’Founded by 1992 by Sharma, The Kalakar Trust has grown to benefit more than 1200 families of mostly puppeteers, dancers, musicians, acrobats, and magicians.  The funding for the Trust comes from the sale of Sharma’s paintings.  The basic aim of the Trust is to keep the traditional art of these communities alive by providing education, health services, drinking water, income generation arts and community management.The Kalakar Trust is an NGO working for the up-liftment of underprivileged artists living in Delhi slums. The major project is in Katputli colony, West Delhi. The basic aim of the trust is to keep the traditional art of these communities alive by providing education, health services, drinking water, income generation arts and community management.last_img read more