Le Parisien: the Tour delays another week Roland Garros

first_imgThis measure could be taken by the French Tennis Federation (FFT) in order that the begin of the event didn’t coincide with the finish of the Tour, rescheduled in flip to be held from August 29 to September 20, which might pressure a further police deployment in a day that will be very sophisticated in Paris.This alteration would even be a aid for French nationwide tv, which broadcasts each occasions, and for the 24 Hours of Le Mans, which happen between September 19 and 20. Tour sources acknowledged to AS these logistical issues and the comfort of separating the two jewels of French sport. At the identical time, the further week that will be free might be taken benefit of by different tournaments held on clay, comparable to the Mutua Madrid Open and Rome, which might perform in 14 days a mini land tour after the US Open (August 31 to September 13) for many who wouldn’t favor to relaxation between two Grand Slams. In accordance Le ParisienRoland Garros would have determined to delay its begin for another week, after unilaterally altering its dates because of the COVID-19 pandemic, which had been initially from Could 24 to June 7, for these from September 20 to October 4. The event would begin like this on September 27 and would finish on October 11. (INFO LE PARISIEN) Roland-Garros décalé au 27 septembreRe️ Reprogrammés une première fois du 20 septembre au Four octobre, les Internationaux de France vont être, selon nos informations, décalés d’une semaine> https://t.co/YuFbZVGkRp pic.twitter.com/DIZwECAez9– Le Parisien (@le_Parisien) April 23, 2020last_img read more

Cal State breaks 2-game skid

first_imgThe win keeps the Coyotes (15-5, 11-4 California Collegiate Athletic Association), ranked 17th nationally, one game behind Humboldt State, which defeated Dominguez Hills 70-62, in conference. Cal State is also ranked first in the West Region, although that is likely to change next week because of the loss to the Broncos on Tuesday. “We were much more focused. We knew we had to take care of business,” senior wing Yoseph Yaisrael said. “We let two slip away and it’s too late in the season to be doing that.” Unlike the last several games, this outcome was never in doubt. The contest was knotted at 10 before the Coyotes took control with a 15-0 run, highlighted by 3-pointers from Ivan Johnson, Yaisrael and David Reichel. That lead ballooned to 33 points in the second half at 59-26 on a fastbreak layup by Chet Johnson. The Coyotes allowed the Gators to cut the lead to 17 at 66-49, but restored order quickly to keep the blowout on track. “We needed some momentum back,” Coyotes coach Jeff Oliver said. “We needed to feel positive about ourselves again. We had two games where we struggled. Tonight we made more plays. Hopefully this rolls over into (today).” Ivan Johnson did much of the damage with a season-high 23 points coming on 9-for-11 shooting from the field. Most impressive was the 6-foot-8 center’s 3-for-3 showing from long distance. He also contributed five rebounds, two blocks, three assists and three steals. SAN BERNARDINO – The Cal State San Bernardino men’s basketball team had three days to sit and stew about its second loss of the season to local and conference rival Cal Poly Pomona. It helped, as the Coyotes played more focused in cruising to a 86-55 win over visiting San Francisco State Friday at Coussoulis Arena. center_img Oliver used 12 players, 10 of whom figured in the scoring. Johnson led five Coyotes in double figures. Yaisrael and Greg Williams, Johnson’s backup, both had 13 points with Chet Johnson chipping in with 11 and Prentice Harris 10. The point guard duo of Marlon Pierce and Lance Ortiz combined for eight assists. “We lost two in a row. We’re not trying to lose any more,” Ivan Johnson said. “I was more focused. I wanted to go out there and be a factor early.” The Coyotes shot 49.3 percent (33-for-67) from the field and held the Gators (6-14, 2-13) to 38.9 percent (21-for-54) and forced 19 turnovers. Sophomore guards Alex Thomas and Will Logan led the Gators with 11 points each. Logan, an Apple Valley High School product, also tallied four rebounds and a steal. The Coyotes played without junior forward Joseph Tillman, who had surgery for a broken nose earlier in the day. He will be out for at least two weeks. Cal State continues its homestand tonight, playing host to Monterey Bay at 7:30 p.m. When the teams played earlier this season the Coyotes posted a slim 74-70 win, nearly blowing a 21-point lead. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Day exposes girls to math, science fields

first_imgVALENCIA – Some 200 seventh- and eighth-grade girls spent Saturday morning learning how to become millionaires, pharmacists and scientists. Women with careers in math and science fields led the hourlong workshops at Valencia High School with the hopes that the young audience in ponytails and low-rise jeans will become tomorrow’s brain surgeons, veterinarians and dentists. “It’s important that junior-high girls realize the opportunities open to them in math and science fields and not to be intimidated by past male stereotypes in those fields,” said Jane Hanson, charter member of the American Association of University Women, which sponsored the event. Some of the professionals have noticed that times are changing in the work force and that fields once dominated by men now have many more women. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE‘Mame,’ ‘Hello, Dolly!’ composer Jerry Herman dies at 88 In her work with emergency animal care and animal training, Fawn Nyvold said both fields are heavily saturated with women. It’s a total about-face from 15 years ago, when women were scarcely seen working with animals. Nyvold said there are still a lot of men in the field, but at the same time there are many more women these days graduating from college and pursuing animal-related professions. She wonders if women are drawn to the work because of their nurturing instincts. “I think some of it is maternal instinct and in general more women are doing more jobs that men used to do,” she said. Biology professor Jen Chotiner of Mount St. Mary’s College has noticed that the ratio of women to men in science is about equal. But the problem is that women don’t stay in the field, Chotiner said. Women sometimes leave to raise families and because they’re frustrated that they can’t penetrate science’s upper levels, she said. But science is changing as older people retire. With that, Chotiner hopes that more women will move up the ladder. “As these girls move into science careers, there will be less of that, I imagine,” she said, looking at the 12- and 13-year-old girls in her workshop. “Things are on their way to changing.” As she walked from one workshop to the next, 13-year-old Karinne Smith held up a building she made from Popsicle sticks in a session about structural design. But it was the lesson about biotechnology and DNA that really got the attention of the La Mesa Junior High eighth-grader. “The genetic part of it makes it cool,” she said. “DNA looks so small but it really is large when you think about it.” Sue Doyle, (661) 257-5254 sue.doyle@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Boner wins Na Rossa 5K – where did you come?

first_imgNa Rossa GAA 5K 2016Place Bib Name Gender AG Club Time1. 38 Christian Boner m SM na Rossa 17:59,62. 50 Charlie O Donnell m SM Bog A.C. 18:13,93. 44 Manus Mc Hugh m SM Bog A.C. 18:58,14. 91 Clive O Donohoe m SM 19:17,25. 45 Paul Mc Kelvey m SM Bog A.C. 19:54,76. 90 Kevin Brannan m M40 Bog A.C. 20:12,47. 47 Karen Gallagher f SW Finn Valley A.C. 20:14,48. 92 Rory O Donnell m SM 20:20,09. 2 Jack Walsh m B16 20:45,610. 37 Oisin Caulfield m B16 na Rossa 20:53,811. 73 Donal Trimble m SM 21:04,412. 81 Feargús Óg Campbell m B16 22:14,313. 1 Owen Coyle m M40 Rosses A.C. 22:41,914. 31 Kevin Mc Donald m SM 22:53,515. 41 Jamie Doherty m B16 23:08,716. 53 Jackie Harvey f W40 Tir Chonaill A.C. 23:09,817. 27 Edwina Sweeney f W40 Tir Chonaill A.C. 23:13,618. 48 Manus O Donnell m M40 23:18,719. 32 Eamonn Mc Cready m M40 23:40,320. 59 Mark Bonner m B16 24:11,421. 26 Patricia Hegarty f W40 Tir Chonaill A.C. 24:12,422. 4 Thomas Mc Devitt m B16 24:25,123. 9 Joseph Casey m M40 24:27,024. 33 Rhianna Mc Cready f G16 Rosses A.C. 24:41,925. 20 Jamie O Donnell m B16 24:49,026. 29 Eisin Mc Donald f SW 24:50,027. 6 Conor Mc Devitt m B16 24:55,128. 22 Debbie Coll f W40 25:28,429. 10 Fiona Morrow f SW 26:01,830. 24 Nicola Bonner f SW Tir Chonaill A.C. 26:09,831. 23 Stephaine Brennan f SW Tir Chonaill A.C. 26:10,032. 88 Ann Marie Gibbons f W40 Fintown 26:36,833. 95 Bridget Molloy f SW 27:07,934. 62 Kathleen Mc Devitt f W40 Fintown 27:12,835. 64 Angela Trimble f W40 Tir Chonaill A.C. 27:43,236. 17 Mark Mc Cready m B16 na Rossa 28:27,337. 30 Marianne Mc Donald f SW 28:38,438. 77 Marie Mc Gill f W40 28:43,639. 49 Geraldine Bonner f SW 28:47,940. 43 Logan Melly m B16 na Rossa 28:48,141. 94 Nabla Campbell f SW 29:35,042. 99 Maureen Boyle f SW Fintown 29:44,143. 78 Liam Shanley m B16 29:54,944. 3 Erin Calder f G16 30:32,045. 74 Nuala Mc Cool f SW 30:34,146. 42 Kieran Doherty m B16 na Rossa 30:45,747. 40 Ava Caulfield f G16 30:54,048. 93 Darragh Mc Gillicuddy m B16 30:56,749. 82 Sinéad Mulreany f SW 30:58,050. 89 Nessa Campbell f W40 31:06,851. 84 Darren Whelan m SM Tir Chonaill A.C. 32:02,052. 25 Patrick Srevinson m SM 32:09,753. 104 Ciaran Mc Geean m B16 35:08,654. 16 Kalim Mc Gughal m B16 35:08,655. 83 Caoimhín Shankey Smith m B16 36:19,456. 52 Breid Marie Hanlon f SW 36:28,857. 87 Anita Boner f SW 36:28,858. 5 Roisín Mc Devitt f G16 36:54,459. 65 Gracie Trimble f G16 38:26,760. 70 Ava Trimble f G16 38:28,861. 75 Caitriona Campbell f G16 39:03,362. 76 Emma Shankey Smith f G16 39:10,663. 7 Mo Calder f W40 39:32,064. 8 Maureen Mc Devitt f SW 39:33,665. 79 Louisa Joy Shanley f G16 39:47,266. 54 Debbie Hannan f W40 Fintown 41:12,067. 98 Joey O Donnell m B16 Donaghmore Ashbourne 42:33,468. 12 Jack O Donnell m B16 na Rossa 43:09,269. 51 Ashling Mc Monagle f SW 44:15,370. 96 Sarah O Donnell f SW Donaghmore Ashbourne 44:15,471. 14 Anna May O Donnell f G16 na Rossa 45:24,172. 85 Aina Mc Geehan f G16 46:22,973. 86 Caoimhe Mc Dermott f G16 46:39,774. 102 Daithí Molloy m B16 47:53,475. 100 Martin Molloy m SM 49:58,376. 97 Shaun Caulfield m SM 49:59,3Boner wins Na Rossa 5K – where did you come? was last modified: August 8th, 2016 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Women’s Soccer Opens 2016 Season With 1-0 Win At North Dakota State

first_imgStory Links HTML Box Score “Tonight’s game was a good road test for us,” said Drake head coach Lindsey Horner. “Our midfield was stretched in the first half but after the break we were far more organized and better at playing quickly centrally which created dangerous moments for our wide players. We had three good chances in the second half prior to the goal. We knew we had to put one away while we had the momentum. Overall we got better during the game and demonstrated the necessary grit defending on the road to earn a clean sheet.”  Print Friendly Version Next Game: Freeman, who missed nearly all of the 2015 season due to a knee injury, scored off a corner kick from junior Kasey Hurt (Ankeny, Iowa) in the 67th minute. PDF Box Score Full Schedule Roster Preview at UIC 8/26/2016 – 7 PM Drake continues the 2016 season on the road next weekend with matches at UIC and Wisconsin on Aug. 26 and Aug. 28, respectively. The Bulldogs open their home slate at Cownie on Sept. 2 against South Dakota. Junior goalkeeper Haley Morris (Clive, Iowa) started the first half and senior Brooke Dennis (Wauconda, Ill.) started in between the posts in the final half. They each tallied one save. Drake and North Dakota State each recorded three shots on goal. Sophomore Vanessa Kavan (Lincoln, Neb.) and senior Rebecca Rodgers (Peotone, Ill.) each recorded two shots. Live Stats FARGO, N.D. – Redshirt senior Alex Freeman (Duluth, Minn.) scored the game-winning goal for the Drake University women’s soccer team to edge North Dakota State, 1-0, Friday night in the season-opener for both schools.last_img read more

Chelsea v Dynamo Kiev: Blues duo return and Hazard is a sub

first_imgMidfield duo Nemanja Matic and Cesc Fabregas return to the Chelsea starting line-up for the Champions League clash with Dynamo Kiev at Stamford Bridge, while Eden Hazard drops back to the substitutes’ bench along with Gary Cahill.Cesar Azpilicueta starts for the Blues at right-back, with Baba Rahman coming in at left-back and Kurt Zouma partnering skipper John Terry at the heart of the defence.Chelsea: Begovic; Azpilicueta, Zouma, Terry, Baba; Ramires, Matic; Willian, Fabregas, Oscar; Diego Costa.Subs: Blackman, Cahill, Loftus-Cheek, Kenedy, Hazard, Pedro, Remy.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

Career guidance initiative launched

first_imgNedbank and Primestars are joined byPPC Cement, Gauteng City RegionAcademy, Quest, the South AfricanInstitute of Chartered Accountants,the National Youth DevelopmentAgency and the JD Group assponsors of the programme. Martin Sweet says the project is aimedat inspiring youngsters to play a key rolein overcoming the current projected skillsshortage and the high rate ofunemployment in South Africa.(Images: Ray Maota) MEDIA CONTACTS • Nkosinathi MsizaSenior Communications ManagerNedbank+27 11 295 3560RELATED ARTICLES• Nedbank invests in water project• Nedbank branch runs on wind power• Pens for needy children • Education goes mobile with Vodacom• Can drive raises R8.5m for educationRay MaotaNedbank, one of South Africa’s big four banks, has launched a career guidance initiative for underprivileged high school students that will benefit more than 40 000 pupils in grades 9 to 12 across the country.The launch took place at the Michelangelo Towers hotel on Nelson Mandela Square in Sandton on 15 February 2012, emceed by popular 5FM radio and television presenters, Anele Mdoda and Gareth Cliff.Early career guidanceIn the third year of this initiative, the bank will invest more than R5-million in its My Future My Career programme. It will promote more than 100 career choices across 14 industries and will enable the pupils to discover the academic as well as personality requirements of each career.The students will gain insight into these careers through movie episodes shown at Ster-Kinekor theatres around the country. They will also learn from professionals in the working world what to expect in these careers.Kone Gugushe, Nedbank’s divisional executive for corporate social responsibility, said: “Time and again we see too many students showing up at universities without a clue of what they want to and, more importantly, can study,” Gugushe said.He added that the programme will give students insight into careers and improve the prospects of developing skills in critical sectors such as financial services, health and engineering.The programme, which is endorsed by the Department of Basic Education, was conceptualised by Primestars Marketing, which is also the project manager.Martin Sweet, managing director of Primestars Marketing, said that the project hopes to inspire youngsters to play a key role in overcoming the current projected skills shortage and the high rate of unemployment in South Africa.Through the programme, young people will also be encouraged to explore and take full advantage of the career opportunities.Nedbank and Primestars are joined by PPC Cement, Gauteng City Region Academy, Quest, the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants, the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) and the JD Group as sponsors of the programme.Where to catch the screeningsScreenings will include the following careers: accounting, law, entrepreneurship, mining and engineering, education, health, IT, construction, travel and tourism. Each pupil who attends a screening will leave with a reference booklet on that particular career.The screenings start on 26 February, with the subjects of entrepreneurship and tourism; on 4 March, it is the turn of IT and communications; on 11 March, mining, engineering and construction; on 18 March, banking, finance and accounting; on 15 April, criminal justice and law; on 22 April, health services and education; and on 29 April, arts and culture, and transport, logistics and distribution.They will take place at various theatres countrywide – in Gauteng at Brooklyn in Pretoria; at Eastgate; Sandton; Maponya Mall; Southgate; Eastrand Mall and Westgate in Johannesburg; in Northern Cape at North Cape Mall in Kimberley; in Free State at Mimosa Mall in Bloemfontein; in North West at Rustenburg; in Limpopo at Savannah Mall in Polokwane; and in Kwazulu-Natal at Gateway and Musgrave in Durban.In Western Cape pupils can catch the screenings at Cape Gate and Cavendish in Cape Town; while in the Eastern Cape, they will be at The Bridge in Port Elizabeth and Vincent Park in East London.“The JD Group realises the challenges and the effects of unemployment in South Africa, particularly among the youth of the country. It is with this mind that we partnered with the My Future, My Career initiative,” said Richard Chauke, a director at JD Group.These career episodes will also be screened at 13 NYDA youth centres across the country.The Nedbank FoundationThe Nedbank Foundation is the primary corporate social investment arm of Nedbank.Early this year it launched its Back to School campaign at Ga-Masemola village in Limpopo, where 150 pupils from four schools in the area received essential school items such as uniforms, shoes, stationery, books, bags and sports kits, to start their school year on a high note.It also has other projects that benefit underprivileged students, such as the Nedbank Fundisa Maths and Science Project, under which maths and science teachers in Eastern Cape and Limpopo are enrolled at Unisa for a one-year course on improving their classroom teaching techniques.The foundation also runs the Nedbank Mobile Library Project, the Matric Exam Revision Programme, and the M2 Mathematics Project.last_img read more

New guide helps farmland owners considering solar leasing

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Peggy Kirk Hall, director of agricultural law, Ohio State University Agricultural and Resource Law ProgramLarge “utility-scale” solar energy development is on the rise in Ohio. In the past two years, the Ohio Power Siting Board has approved six large-scale solar projects with generating capacities of 50MW or more, and three more projects are pending approval. These “solar farms” require a large land base, and in Ohio that land base is predominantly farmland. Nine new Ohio solar energy facilities will cover about 16,500 acres in Brown, Clermont, Hardin, Highland, and Vinton counties. About 12,300 of those acres were previously used for agriculture.With solar energy development, then, comes a new demand for farmland: solar leasing. Many Ohio farmland owners have received post cards and letters about the potential of leasing land to a solar energy developer. This prospect might sound appealing at first, particularly in a difficult farming year like this one. But leasing land for a solar energy development raises many implications for the land, family, farm operation, and community. It’s a long-term legal commitment — usually 25 years or more — that requires careful assessment and a bit of homework.To help landowners who are considering solar leasing, we’ve joined forces with Eric Romich, OSU Extension’s Field Specialist in Energy Education, to publish the Farmland Owner’s Guide to Solar Leasing. The online guide at https://farmoffice.osu.edu/sites/aglaw/files/site-library/Farmland_Owner%27s_Guide_to_Solar_Leasing.pdf explains the state of solar energy development in Ohio, reviews initial considerations for leasing farmland to solar, and describes legal documents and common terms used for solar leasing. The guide’s solar leasing checklist organizes the information into a list of issues to consider, things to do, people to consult, and questions to ask before deciding whether to enter into a solar lease.A separate Law Bulletin of The Farmland Owner’s Solar Leasing Checklist is also available at https://farmoffice.osu.edu/sites/aglaw/files/site-library/The_Farmland_Owner%27s_Solar_Leasing_Checklist.pdf.We produced the guide in partnership with the National Agricultural Law Center at the University of Arkansas, with funding from the National Agricultural Library, Agricultural Research Service, at the United States Department of Agriculture.last_img read more

Podcast: Earth’s Demise, the Downsides of Treating Fever, and More

first_imgWhen is Earth going to die? Can treating your fever hurt society? And what can lasers reveal about famous paintings? Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm chats about these stories and more with Science’s Sarah Crespi.Listen to the full Science podcast.Hear more podcasts.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Astrophysicists Build a Virtual Universe

first_imgIn the most detailed effort yet, astrophysicists and cosmologists have modeled the evolution of the universe right down to the formation of individual galaxies. The results of the mammoth computer simulation neatly match multiple astronomical observations, ranging from the distribution of galaxies in massive galaxy clusters to the amounts of neutral hydrogen gas in galaxies large and small. The findings once again neatly confirm cosmologists’ standard theory of the basic ingredients of the universe and how it evolved—a result that may disappoint researchers hoping for new puzzles to solve.”This is a tremendous advance,” says Carlos Frenk, a cosmologist at Durham University in the United Kingdom, who works on a competing effort. “It changes the way we can address the physics at play in nature because we have a tool to handle the details.” However, one leading researcher argues that the new work is not all it’s cracked up to be.For just over a decade, cosmologists and astrophysicists have known the precise recipe for the universe. From studies of the afterglow of the big bang or cosmic microwave background, the distribution of the galaxies, and other observations, they have determined that the universe consists of 5% ordinary matter like that in stars and people, 27% mysterious dark matter whose gravity holds the galaxies together, and 68% bizarre space-stretching dark energy, which is causing the expansion of the universe to accelerate.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Given that recipe, researchers have been able to simulate the evolution of the universe. In particular, in 2005 European researchers, including Frenk, developed the Millennium Simulation, which traced how over the age of the universe dark matter coalesced through its own gravity into gargantuan clumps and strands in a “cosmic web.” Ordinary matter settled into the clumps to produce stars and galaxies. The Millennium Simulation matched statistically the size distribution of real galaxies and the way the galaxies are scattered throughout space. The results greatly bolstered the case for cosmologists’ theory—which is known as ΛCDM (pronounced “lambda CDM”).However, the Millennium Simulation was also limited, notes Mark Vogelsberger, an astrophysicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. That’s because it actually tracked only the evolution of the dark matter web. Ordinary matter and galaxies were inserted into the web only at the end, using ad hoc rules taken from more detailed simulations of individual galaxies. Such an approach is known as semianalytic modeling. Now, Vogelsberger and colleagues have taken a step beyond that approach by developing a simulation that incorporates ordinary matter, in the form of hydrogen gas, from the start, as they report online today in Nature.Known as Illustris, the new simulation tracks the evolution of a cubic chunk of the universe measuring roughly 350 million light-years on a side, which ends up containing 41,416 galaxies. The model is so demanding that it would take 2000 years to run on a single desktop computer. The difference between Illustris and its predecessor shines through in the animation Vogelsberger and colleagues made from the new simulation. Whereas Millennium shows only a relatively placid cosmic web, Illustris abounds with explosions: blasts of hot gas emanating from around the supermassive black holes in the hearts of galaxies. Such outflows are crucial to galaxy formation, as they can blow hydrogen gas out of a galaxy to slow or stop star formation.To demonstrate that the new simulation reproduces the universe as we know it, Vogelsberger and colleagues show that it can reproduce a number of key observables, such as the abundances of elements heavier than helium in galaxies and intergalactic gas clouds. “The conclusion is that we think we have a pretty good understanding of galaxy formation and also that ΛCDM is basically correct,” Vogelsberger says.Illustris is the first simulation that’s big enough to model a representative patch of the whole universe but detailed enough to track individual galaxies, says Simon White, a cosmologist at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching, Germany, who also worked on the Millennium Simulation. “It’s the combination of those two things that is new,” he says.However, Joel Primack, a cosmologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz, argues that developers have oversold the new work. Although Illustris makes an important step by modeling gas on large scales, it still lacks the resolution to directly model, say, supermassive black holes themselves, he says. So it still uses semianalytic rules to account for such details, he says. “The people who are not in the field are reading the hype and being misled into thinking what they are doing is revolutionary and that people who aren’t doing it are missing the boat,” Primack says. “And that’s just wrong.”Ultimately, the new simulation may be judged by its utility. It could be used to follow the evolution of particular types of objects through cosmic time, or to make predictions about what observers might see when they finally look back and count the earliest galaxies, Durham’s Frenk says. It’s where the simulation fails to match the data that it will be most fruitful, notes Marla Geha, an astrophysicist at Yale University. For example, Illustris seems to suggest that the stars in smaller galaxies form earlier than observations show. “There is something in star formation that isn’t working in extreme conditions, so it can’t be the whole story,” she says. “That’s intriguing to see.”(Video credit: Illustris Collaboration)last_img read more