Six Nations: France 30-10 Italy

first_img–      Sebastien Vahaamahina was on the pitch less than three minutes before being yellow carded and missing the rest of the game–      Bernard Le Roux, the French openside flanker left the field with a head injury and will be assessed by the medical team.Fly-guy: Fofana once again showed his class to scoreWhat’s next?–      France will have been buoyed by three tries in six minutes but they were pretty ordinary outside that flurry. The French pack will not have enjoyed being driven backwards by Castrogiovanni and a grizzled Azzurri pack in the first-half and even though they improved in the after the break they will know they will need to improve against a fired up Welsh front-row.–       Les Bleus did show that in runners like Wesley Fofana, Brice Dulin, Yoann Huget and Hugo Bonneval that they do possess players with flair, a lost characteristic of French rugby in recent years. They need to provide a platform and game plan to involve these players and not regress to playing a 10-man game–       Italy, without being outplayed, still ended up on the back of a 27-point loss. Despite Jacques Brunel purporting to play a more expansive game, it was only in the last few minutes, when France were down to 13-men that Italy managed to dent the French defence. They need more guile and ambition outwide if they are to match last year’s two wins.–       With Michele Rizzo sent-off, the Azzurri will not want to lose their discipline in what is likely to be a key game against Scotland in RomeRW’s proposed France XV v Wales:Brice Dulin; Yoann Huget, Mathieu Bastareaud, Wesley Fofana, Hugo Bonneval; Jules Plisson, Jean-Marc Doussain; Thomas Domingo, Dimitri Szarzewski, Nicolas Mas, Pascal Pape, Yoann Maestri, Yannick Nyanga, Damien Chouly Louis Picamoles,After such a comprehensive win, the only change is for Chouly to replace the injured Le Roux. With Bastareaud softening up the Welsh defence, they can bring on the exciting Gael Fickou when the game breaks up. Machenaud is pushing Doussain who keeps his place for his place kicking. Plisson impressed and keeps his place in front of the returning Francois Trinh-DucRW’s proposed Italy XV v Scotland: Wall of blue: French scrum-half Maxime Machenaud tries to find his way past the Italian defenceThe match in 30 secondsFrance remain unbeaten and travel to Cardiff in a fortnight looking for a third straight win. Little was expected after a turgid first-half affair, with kickers from both sides, Jean-Marc Doussain and Tomasso Allan profligate from the deck early on. The second-half was better as France showed ambition, scoring three tries in nine minutes between the 45th and 51st minute to rouse the Stade de France. First it was No 8 Louis Picamoles bolting from a maul to power. Minutes later, Wesley Fofana picked up from the base of a ruck to scamper down the wing to score, and finally debutant Hugo Bonneval finished off a classic French move started by Fofana and finished off by debutant Hugo Bonneval. With 10 minutes to go the game took a murkier turn as both Rabah Slimani and Michele Rizzo were shown red to become the first duo to be sent off since 1992. With France down to 13 men, with Vahaamahina in the sin-bin, Tommaso Iannone snuck in late on to give the scoreline a modicum of respectability.Scrappy affair: Both sides struggled for fluencyFrance 30 (9)Pens: Doussain 3 Cons: Doussain 3Tries: Picamole, Fofana, BonnevalItaly 10 (3)Pen: Allan. Try: Iannone. Con OrqueraPost-match bulletin–      When Rabah Slimani and Michele Rizzo were shown red after 70 minutes, they became the first pair to be sent off since Vincent Moscato and Gregoire Lascube were sent off against England in 1992–       France ran further with the ball, carrying the ball 426m, while Italy ran 367m but France were far more potent–       Surprisingly, given the scoreline, Italy had much more of the possession, 58% compared to 42% for France. It was similar for territory, France 39% and Italy 61%–       Top tackler on the day was France fly-half Jules Plisson with 12, Yannick Nyanga, Bernard Le Roux, Martin Castrogiovanni, Joshua Furno, Leonardo Ghiraldini and Francesco Minto had 10. Wesley Fofana made the most metres, 96, followed closely by Brice Dulin with 82m. For Italy, Luke McLean ran 81m–      France made eight clean breaks and beat 20 defenders, compared to Italy who made three clean breaks and beat 18 defenders. Luke McLean; Tommaso Iannone, Michele Campagnaro, Alberto Sgarbi, Leonardo Sarto; Luciano Orquera, Tobias Botes; Alberto de Marchi, Leonardo Ghiraldini, Martin Castrogiovanni, Quintin Geldenhuys, Joshua Furno, Alessandro Zanni, Sergio ParisseAllan has looked a little green for international rugby so the experienced Orquera comes in to boss the try-shy backs. He is accompanied by Tobias Botes who looked sharper than Edoardo Gori. In the pack, Alessandro Zanni returns after a broken nose incurred against Wales.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Top 14: Stade Francais coach Gonzalo Quesada on their title defence

first_img Team effort: Stade Francais celebrate beating Clermont in last season’s final. Photo: Getty Images As the 2015-16 Top 14 kicks off in France, Rugby World talks to Stade Francais coach Gonzalo Quesada about defending their title GQ: When we bring in big names it’s important we believe they can fit into our framework. Our president has been strongly criticised by some people who said he was not ambitious enough with his recruitment compared to other clubs. But we are very careful and bring in guys only when we’re sure they are going to add to the squad. So that’s why if you compare us to the likes of Toulon, Racing and Montpellier we recruit fewer players because we recruit carefully so we don’t create problems inside the squad.RW: Are there any young academy players we should keep an eye on?GQ: When I arrived here our academy was not our strength. Last year was better, and this year it will be very strong with the likes of Mathieu de Giovanni and Sekou Macalou. Increasingly I prefer to push our kids up (from the academy) rather than just grab any high-profile player who comes along.RW: Were you approached for the France job earlier this year?GQ: Before the official application process was launched I had a couple of phone calls from the federation sounding me out, seeing if I could be interested in applying. That was it. Then I heard there was a shortlist and I was on it but I don’t know how real that was – it may just have been rumours. But anyway I re-signed with Stade in December and even if I have a clause in my contract releasing me if I’m called by a national team, I am still in the middle of my project here.Top trio: Gonzalo Quesada (right) celebrates with Sergio Parisse and Thomas Savare. Photo: Getty ImagesRW: How impressed are you with what Simon Mannix has achieved in his first season in charge of Pau?GQ: I know Pau well because I played there and he’s done well to come in, keep the good stuff that was there but also bring in a new style and get everyone behind him in the process. It’s a big achievement because it’s always tough to come into a new club, particularly if you’re a foreigner.RW: Talking of tough, Parisians have a reputation for being hard to please. How have you found the Stade fans since your arrival?GQ: It is tough because Parisians have so many things to do outside rugby. In Toulon or Perpignan rugby is the big entertainment. In Paris you are in competition with other sports, theatres, operas, music concerts and so on. I think we’ve created a spirit within the club that the fans can feel and which they respond to and which brings in new fans. Also our style is attractive and nice to watch. It would be hard to convince Parisians to come and watch us if we played slow, conservative rugby.RW: How much greater is the pressure now you’re champs? This time last year few people imagined Stade Francais would end up being crowned Top 14 champions for the 2014-15 season. Toulon, Clermont or even Parisian rivals Racing maybe, but not Stade who hadn’t even managed to qualify for the inaugural European Champions Cup the previous season. What no one envisaged was the strength of the Stade Francais spirit, nor the boldness of their game plan, nor the tactical nous of their coach, Gonzalo Quesada. As Stade prepare to start the defence of their title against Pau on Sunday, Rugby World sat down with Quesada to learn more about the secrets of his success…Rugby World: Did you start last season believing you were title contenders?Gonzalo Quesada: No. I knew that one day we were going to do something interesting, we had the squad with the quality and the spirit. But I didn’t think it would happen so quickly. I thought it might be the season after.RW: So the reason for the success?GQ: When I arrived at Stade I established a framework that set out how we would work and train, the rules we’d respect, squad discipline, and our playing philosophy. But I also created within the framework the space for players to be responsible for their own destinies. In the first season it was all new to them and it wasn’t until start of the second season that I started to see they believed in what we were trying to achieve.RW: Was there a point last season you started to believe you could win the title?GQ: We had a spell where we lost three out of four games, including our first home defeat (to Oyonnax on 31 January). I think it was during that period we got stronger. We spent four days in the mountains, going out having nice meals together, laughing, drinking beer. It was a risk because it was the most anti-sport holiday you could imagine. But the squad returned stronger than ever – albeit with a big headache and a couple of extra kilos – and then we put 40 points on Clermont in our next game. That was the first moment that I saw the spirit within the squad and believed we could do something special.Turning point: Remi Bonfils attacks during Stade’s 40-26 win over Clermont in March. Photo: Getty ImagesRW: Why did you accept the Stade job in 2013 given their recent financial problems?GQ: Yes, when I signed on at this club it was quite unstable with a lot of changes in the structures, the players, the coaches. But I know this club. I played here and kept in contact with them and I like its identity. When they offered me the position some of my friends said, ‘Don’t go there, you’re too young, your career is going really well and you’ll blow it there’. But I knew it wasn’t that suicidal because I know the spirit of the club.RW: Describe your relationship with club president Thomas Savare.GQ: From the first day Thomas understood that I arrived willing to work hard and do my best to get Stade back to where it had been. I won his trust and in return he gives me freedom. I talk to Thomas once or twice a week, or maybe not for a fortnight. I know that I’m very lucky because I have contacts at other clubs who tell me some presidents are always there, wanting to know what’s going on, putting an extra bit of pressure on the staff. I feel I don’t have that extra pressure, that Thomas believes in what we are doing and he let me do things my way.RW: Stade haven’t recruited as extravagantly as their rivals in recent years. Why not?center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS GQ: We’re aware it’s a lot more now because everyone has a special motivation to beat us. We did some work on that during our pre-season training camp – identifying the dangers we face from the outside and from the inside. By that I mean how being champions might affect our behaviour and our attitude. It threw up some interesting results and I think it will help us during the season. But in a way we’re lucky that the start of the season is so disrupted by the World Cup. I’m missing 13 players so right now we’re more focused on trying to get through this month with so many key players missing rather than worrying about being champions.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Find out how to download the magazine here.last_img read more

Josh Beaumont: meet England’s new kid on the block

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The uncapped Sale No 8’s ball-playing and lineout skills have propelled him into Eddie Jones’s first England squad. Son of Grand Slam-winning captain Bill, the 23-year-old has taken a different route to most in the pro game, as he recently told Rugby World… I first played rugby aged seven at Fylde RFC. The ground was only a two-minute walk away and it’s where all my family have played their rugby as well. Then I moved on to schoolboy rugby at Arnold School in Blackpool, which doesn’t exist now because it merged with our local rivals King Edward’s.I’m the youngest of three brothers. Sam, 30, is captain and No 8 at Fylde where I played a lot of rugby with him. Danny, 33, stopped playing when he went to work in London as an accountant.I’ve only been a forward since I was 16 or 17. I wasn’t that big and played at fly-half or centre, and kicked goals. Growing up I followed the likes of Will Greenwood and Jonny Wilkinson, the 2000-2003 era.It helps to have played in a variety of positions. I feel comfortable with ball in hand, especially in the wide channels. Not that I shirk going into rucks and doing the tight, nitty-gritty stuff – that’s my first priority – but if I can be used in those wider channels, that’s where I’m most effective.I like the responsibility of making decisions on the pitch. Michael Paterson called the lineouts last year but then got injured, so Nathan Hines suggested to Steve Diamond that I have a go. They helped me massively. Bryn Evans is doing it this year but I’m comfortable stepping in.We’re seeing more defending teams not contest at lineouts, which is not a positive move – it gives the opposition easy ball. If you’re well drilled, then the lineout is a good weapon to win ball back and slow down opposition phase play.Brian Ashton was a big influence on my development. I played under him at Fylde and his way of thinking I’d never experienced before. He helped our attacking play, making us think on the pitch. To have world-class coaching like that at my age was really beneficial.Lateral thinker: Brian Ashton had a huge effect on the young Beaumont when he coached Fylde (Pic: Getty)Alex Kaye at Durham University was also very influential. He toughened me up and gave me the belief that I was good enough to play professionally. I keep in contact with him a lot.We won Rugby World Team of the Year at Durham and had to replicate a team shot. It was at exam time and we had to spray champagne everywhere and then go back into the library to do our last-minute swatting up!The National Leagues contain some of the most skilful players I’ve come across. They maybe didn’t fancy the professional game or weren’t quite big enough.In the Premiership there are lads I played with for England Students, like Alex Lozowski, Richard Barrington and Simon Hammersley, or against, like Tomas Francis at Leeds University. It’s rare for young forwards to get much game time in the Premiership so to do three years at university level is a great stepping stone to the professional game.I missed the boat in terms of age-group rugby. I only moved positions at 16, 17 and wasn’t picked up by any Premiership clubs. I went to university purely to get a degree and chose Durham because of its strong rugby reputation. Josh the bosh: Beaumont thunders between two Saints defenders in Sale’s colours (Pic: Getty Images) I always have to do the same pre-match warm-up. I do some short sprints, and take three high balls, but if I drop one I’ll have to take another.For the latest subscription offers to Rugby World, click here. All the skills: The No 8, here offloading against Gloucester, played at fly-half in his teens (Pic: Getty)Going to university made me more rounded as an individual. I studied geography and my dissertation was ‘The impact of mining on water quality in the Northern Lake District’. A thrilling title! It seems a long time ago now that I was stood in a river taking water samples and reading many a journal on water quality.I had no thoughts of being a pro player. Halfway through my second year at Durham, I was offered a contract by Sale, who Fylde used to play in pre-season. I’d trained with Newcastle Falcons in pre-season and had to decide between them and Sale. I chose Sale because my roots were in the North-West and they were maybe showing a bit more ambition.I’ve played at Twickenham five times. Four of them were with Durham: the Middlesex Sevens in 2011, and three successive BUCS finals. The last of those was my favourite day at the stadium because I was captain in our last game as a group of players and we beat UWIC. It was also my 21st birthday.The other occasion was for England against the Barbarians last May. My try from that game is on YouTube because of an unbelievable bit of skill by Shane Geraghty, who flicked the ball between his legs to pass to me. I saw the hooker coming and thought I’d try to get outside him. Fortunately I did.Special moment: Scoring for an England XV against the Barbarians at Twickenham last May (Pic: Getty)I’m one of the youngest ever Barbarians players. I played for them in 2010 when I’d just turned 18. Brian Ashton was the coach and I played against Combined Services at Aldershot and later against Richmond, when they celebrated their 150th anniversary.Paul Deacon does a lot of skills work with us at Sale. We want to feel comfortable with ball in hand, try to keep the ball in play and challenge opposition defences. Sometimes it’s hard to break defences down but we know that eventually as fatigues sets in, and concentration goes, it will create opportunities for us.I went to three matches at the World Cup – England v Uruguay in Manchester and both semi-finals. The two best teams were in the final. You’ve got to watch what New Zealand are doing, with Kieran Read, and Brodie Retallick as a second receiver in the line. The way they move the ball, they are so clinical. And they can up the intensity at any moment, like they did after half-time in the semi-final against South Africa.Tiger Woods left me starstruck. I was only about ten or so at the time and saw him in the clubhouse at the Open at Royal Lytham, when the press were round him. He was actually stood next to me.I follow golf and cricket, and football too – I support Blackburn Rovers and go to watch them when I can, which is about five times a year. My favourite sportsman is Cristiano Ronaldo but if I could have a free ticket to any sports event I’d probably go to Super Bowl – I’m a Patriots fan.Magnetism: Real Madrid’s Cristiano Ronaldo is Beaumont’s favourite sportsman (Reuters/Action Images)Fish and chips is my weekly ‘cheat’ meal. But I eat a lot of Italian food, pasta dishes. That’s my favourite food, and not just because I play rugby. TAGS: HighlightSale Sharks last_img read more

Is it worth selling the naming rights to Twickenham?

first_imgThe RFU have hinted that they would sell off the naming rights to Twickenham – but what is the point? They make a bit of money but there is nothing in it for the sponsors… Up for sale? The RFU have hinted they’d consider selling the naming rights for Twickenham. Photo: Getty Images The RFU really aren’t that strapped for cash. Only Twickenham will do.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. All in: BT sponsor Scotland’s shirts as well as Murrayfield. Photo: Getty ImagesWhen I filed from BT Murrayfield after England played Scotland in February my desk lopped off the sponsor’s mention. (note to the SRU – I tried). BT lob a significant amount of cash elsewhere into the Scottish game as part of the deal – but, hey ho, Murrayfield is Murrayfield. And my guv’nor is not wrong.In cricket, the Oval, sorry Kia Oval, has been the Brit Oval and the Foster’s Oval and Test matches in Durham and Manchester are staged at the Emirates Riverside and Emirates Old Trafford respectively. Confused?Of course, Lord’s has resisted the trend but if Twickenham goes down the sponsorship road it will only be a matter of time.You’ve got half a chance if you build a new ground – or sponsor a new tournament, like the Heineken Cup, which got unrivalled coverage for two reasons. Firstly, it was a brilliant European tournament; secondly, it didn’t have a former name and was the new kid on the block.Arsenal’s ground, the Emirates, is the Emirates because it is a new ground and not on the site of the old Highbury. The naming of the Aviva Stadium in Dublin has stuck despite being on the site of the old Lansdowne Road – it is a new ground. The re-naming of the Millennium Stadium to the Principality Stadium… just got lucky.Name game: Arsenal’s Emirates Stadium ahead of a night game. Photo: Getty ImagesAs Tim Crow, CEO of Synergy, the leading sponsorship agency, says:  “It’s a much safer bet to sponsor a new stadium – think of The Emirates or The Aviva: the stadium name is the brand name, so you’re guaranteed media coverage. That’s why those type of sponsorships command such high prices. Sponsoring a stadium with a well-established name like Twickenham is cheaper, but much harder to pull off. It’s possible, but you need a very smart strategy which is not reliant on media exposure.”That is well and good but for a bloke who has been going to Twickenham since 1980 when Bill Beaumont and Geoff Wheel where going toe-to-toe, it will always be Twickenham – whatever its name is. See you outside in the burger-chain-sponsored West Car Park is not going to cut the mustard. The RFU are said to be the richest union in the world but anyone who has not got any change from a tenner when buying a couple of pints at Twickenham will know they are not averse to making a few extra quid.Last week Ian Ritchie, the chief executive of the union, said that he would not be against selling the naming rights to Twickenham on the proviso that the stadium’s historic name was still involved in the title. He also explained that the RFU would be sensitive to which sponsor they would use thus denying the possibility of pitching up at Twickenham in association with Errol’s Greasy Spoon for one of England’s autumn Internationals.But will fans change the names of the ground when they talk about them, will letters from disgusted of Tunbridge Wells flood into The Times or does no one give a monkey’s? All the available evidence nods to the latter. Amongst fans, grounds will always be known by their ‘proper’ names. So why splash the cash?Culture change: Would fans call the stadium anything other than Twickenham? Photo: Getty ImagesThe re-naming of grounds around the world has largely been a waste of time for sponsors, if not for the unions who are banking the cheques. And one industry expert told Rugby World that whoever does do a deal with Ritchie & Co will be doing it with their heart rather than their head.Jacques de Cock, a faculty member of the London School of Marketing, explained: “O2 sponsors the English RFU to the tune of £5-7m a year, this will probably increase after the Six Nations success. Assume that Twickenham would not accept anything less than £2m for naming rights as they view themselves as iconic – which they are – so it would be not a commercial but an emotional spend by a company executive.”Chicken feed really when you consider the massive bung that Premier League football clubs get from TV, and the money coming Twickers’ way might not be enough to sign a reserve team striker at Charlton, but still a nice few quid in the bin when you haven’t got to do anything extra to earn it.Two million notes is enough cash for unions to be interested, but will the people who actually flog to the grounds and shell out more than £100 for a day out really be telling their mates to meet them outside the statue at some no-mark insurance company-sponsored Twickers.Don’t think so – and here is why…Ellis Park in Johannesburg has been called Emirates Airline Park and Coca-Cola Park thus blanking out the contribution of Mr JD Ellis, a councillor who gave permission for the stadium to be built. Sorry Emirates and Coca-Cola, it was and will always be Ellis Park.In Durban, Kings Park has variously been called the ABSA Stadium and Mr Price Kings Park Stadium and is currently Growthpoint Kings Park. Sorry, Kings Park it was and Kings Park it is. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight last_img read more

Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_img Key man: Munster’s CJ Stander scores his sides second try. (Photo: Inpho) Flashpoint: Parling lies prone (right) next to Barrington, with Barritt in the centre (Getty Images)The SinnersBrad Barritt and Ian TempestSaracens prop Richard Barrington was sent off for knocking out Geoff Parling with a high hit in the early stages of Saturday’s Aviva Premiership clash with Exeter Chiefs. But Parling’s head only hit Barrington’s shoulder because Brad Barritt had already walloped the Chiefs lock with a swinging left arm, so how Barritt stayed on the pitch for the remainder of the game is anyone’s guess.Referee Ian Tempest looked at the video replays and as soon as he realised Barrington’s shoulder had done the most damage he just dismissed Barritt’s part in the incident. Barrington deserved to be sent off, but Barritt should have gone too – and the England centre looked mighty relieved to get away with it.Annoyingly for Exeter, Barritt went on to play a major part in the 13-13 draw, as one of Saracens’ outstanding players on the day. Michael Rhodes and Alex LozowskiSaracens had to play for 70 minutes against Exeter Chiefs with 14 men after having Richard Barrington sent off, but managed to eke out a 13-13 draw, thanks partly to magnificent defence from flanker Michael Rhodes and fly-half Alex Lozowski.With his Exeter team leading 10-3, Don Armand charged up the right from outside the 22. Chris Wyles attempted to tackle him into touch but Armand was still set to score, only for Rhodes to dive in and knock the ball out of his hands at the last second.Wonder-try: Jack Nowell dives in at the corner for Exeter against Saracens. (Photo: Getty Images)Lozowski had already made a terrific try-saving tackle on Thomas Waldrom and he put in another big hit on Sam Hill. Lozowski also controlled the game well in attack for Saracens, outshining the Chiefs’ Gareth Steenson who unwisely set himself up for a drop-goal from almost halfway with three minutes of the match remaining. If had waited a few more phases, an easier chance might have been created.An honourable mention must go to Jack Nowell for scoring a terrific try. The Chiefs wing leapt up and stretched out his right hand to gather a kick from Steenson then dived and reached to touch it down in the corner. It was a piece of confident skill any winger would be proud of. CJ StanderMunster put Racing 92 to the sword in their rearranged European Champions Cup clash, trouncing their hosts 32-7. The whole Munster team did their late coach Anthony Foley proud – the match had been postponed from the weekend of his death in October – but CJ Stander was the stand-out performer.The No 8 was everywhere in attack, carrying 23 times, making 63 metres and beating four defenders. He found the time and energy to make eight tackles as well. None of his Munster team mates made it into double-figures for carries and Stander was deservedly named Man of the Match. Running man: Tommy Seymour’s pace was too much for Cardiff. (Photo: Inpho)Tommy SeymourWing Tommy Seymour was on fire in Glasgow Warriors’ 29-15 Guinness Pro12 triumph over Cardiff Blues. He wasn’t among the try-scorers but Seymour helped create two tries for full-back Peter Murchie in the second half. For the first he cut a terrific line from the Blues’ ten metre line and sprinted up to the 22 and from there Glasgow turned the pressure into a try.Just seven minutes later Seymour burst through the defence again, this time from the 22, scorching from right to left and allowing Murchie to finish off the move.Seymour’s pace, timing and judgement were too much for the Blues and Scotland fans will hope he carries this form into the RBS Six Nations next month. Outstanding: Jason Woodward created and scored a great try for Bristol. (Photo: Getty Images)Jason Woodward and Louis PicamolesNorthampton beat Bristol 32-26 but Bristol’s Kiwi full-back Jason Woodward almost earned the visitors a memorable win at Franklin’s Gardens.With his team trailing just 21-16 after 51 minutes, Woodward got the ball inside his 22 and dinked a kick up the left wing for Tom Varndell to chase. The wing gathered it and Woodward sprinted up in support, so he was on hand to take a well-timed pass from Varndell as they crossed the Northampton ten-metre line. From there Woodward easily outpaced Luther Burrell and scored the try which put Bristol 23-21 ahead. Sadly for them they couldn’t hang on, but Woodward is making Bristol a force to be reckoned with.Louis Picamoles is among the Saints for a fantastic charging run which set up Tom Wood’s try. The Frenchman handed off and barged through no less than five defenders to open the door for Wood. Flying Falcon: Vereniki Goneva on the attack for Newcastle v Bath. (Photo: Getty Images)Vereniki Goneva and Joel HodgsonNewcastle Falcons scored two tries in the last eight minutes of their Aviva Premiership clash with Bath to come from 22-10 down to win 24-22. Fly-half Joel Hodgson played a big part in their fightback, sticking to the game plan, kicking out of hand well to put Bath under pressure and converting the last two tries to make sure the Falcons’ efforts resulted in a win. The Saints LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img TAGS: Highlight On the charge: Olly Cracknell had a terrific game for the Ospreys. (Photo: Huw Evans Agency)Olly CracknellAshley Beck scored the bonus-point try for the Ospreys in their 29-7 trouncing of Connacht, thanks to a fine floated pass from Dan Biggar, but Olly Cracknell was arguably the most influential player for the Welsh region.The blindside seemed to be all over the pitch in this win, which enabled the Ospreys to go top in the Pro12. He carried the ball in the lead-up to Dan Baker’s opening try, then scored one of his own two minutes later with a powerful break from the 22. Cracknell was involved again in the build-up to the Ospreys’ third try, which Nicky Smith scored.Steve Tandy’s team are not short of back-row riches, but the 22-year-old is standing up to be counted. Will CliffBristol scrum-half Will Cliff has done plenty of good work for his team in the past but he made a costly error during Saturday’s Aviva Premiership clash with Northampton.With 54 minutes gone, Bristol had just taken a 23-21 lead and needed to consolidate. Stephen Myler kicked the restart long into the Bristol 22, Cliff tried a clearance kick but JJ Hanrahan was far too close for comfort and the Northampton centre charged the kick down, collected it and scored the simplest of tries. That put the Saints back in front again and Bristol were unable to seize back the initiative. Which players were the heroes for their teams in the Aviva Premiership, Guinness Pro12 and Champions Cup matches, and who needs to make an extra effort next time? Newcastle’s announcerThe Newcastle fans took a bit of stick on social media on Friday evening for noisily jeering George Ford as he lined up a penalty kick. However, for me the greater sinner was the PA announcer at Kingston Park, who kept shouting out during passages of play.“Let’s turn up the volume…make some NOISE” he hollered, as Newcastle attacked the Bath line. I might be old fashioned, but I tend to think that if the Falcons supporters aren’t inspired enough by the excitement on the pitch to cheer and shout of their own accord, it is a pretty sad state of affairs. I wish the PA guy would stick to announcing scorers and replacements and leave the players to whip their supporters into a frenzy. Vereniki Goneva was also outstanding. He picked up from a ruck inside the 22, charged through a gap and stepped Anthony Watson to score Newcastle’s first try, and he helped create their match-winning score with a terrific break up the left wing. Goneva battered his way through Semesa Rokoduguni and Watson and from the subsequent pressure position Ben Harris crashed over for the try. A cut above? Max Lahiff’s eye-catching hair style (left). (Photo: Getty Images)Max LahiffThe Bath prop’s hair style has evolved in recent months from a standard “high and tight” to something a bit more outlandish. A top-knot now sits on the back of his head and the back and sides are shaved almost clean. Time to make an appointment at the salon of shame, I feel!last_img read more

Alix Popham dementia highlights need for Head for Change

first_imgEx-Wales star Alix Popham and his wife Mel are at the heart of a new charity promoting brain health. The couple tell RW about the distressing circumstances that gave rise to it Alix chips in at this point. “And that will help the wider population with dementia. We’re not saying they have to sign up for an Ironman but three walks a week could help. For me it’s the little 1%s, the diet, exercise, all coming together to hopefully keep me for as long as possible in a better frame of mind. Better able. We want people to join us and be part of the solution.”Before we finish, Mel tells me about an email from a guy who had played schoolboy rugby and lost a best friend at the age of 18 in a farming accident. The friend was a Welsh boy in an English boarding school and Alix was his favourite player. He used to go into every big tackle on the pitch shouting “Release the Popham!”So this group of 15 boys set up a WhatsApp group and planned to do something to mark the tenth anniversary of their friend’s death. When they heard about Head for Change, they knew their late friend could have thought of no more suitable cause. They will be doing a charity hike in October on the Welsh borders – and Alix Popham has offered to do it with them. “It’s a competition between the guys and the participants getting on their bikes and also for school kids, for people at home, everyone,” Mel says. “People are struggling with their mental health because they can’t be out there playing the team sports that they want to. We’ve already got quite a few schools on board with this who are going to be riding. Alix is planning to do the full 24 hours.“It’s going to be fun but the main purpose is as a fundraiser because we need urgent support. £50 pays for an hour of psychotherapy counselling for an affected player.“When I read the article on Dan Vickerman in The Times I sat and sobbed because it broke my heart that this guy felt he had nowhere to go. And didn’t know what was happening to him. We lived through that for a year, not knowing what was happening to us, and why these symptoms were occurring.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Tragic: ex-Wallaby Dan Vickerman committed suicide (Getty)Head for Change is about research, education and support. It’s not about demanding that rugby’s rulers make significant changes to the game – that’s being addressed elsewhere. Popham is part of a group bringing a concussion lawsuit because of alleged negligence by the game’s authorities.The group released what they term the 15 Commandments, a series of measures they believe would help protect rugby players from concussion and CTE.Related content: World Rugby facing concussion lawsuitOne of the major ones is reducing contact in training, something that could be done swiftly and replicate what the NFL has done. It’s estimated that 85% of Popham’s contacts came from training.Giving pro players an ‘MOT’ is another one, as occurs in boxing. When signing a professional contract, a player could have an MOT on the brain to establish a baseline. And if players’ medical records were on a centralised database with World Rugby, it would be accessible. Popham played for Newport, Leeds, Scarlets and Brive but each club wouldn’t have known how many concussions he had incurred.“Our priority is to protect the players and protect the game,” says Mel. “I still love rugby, Alix doesn’t regret playing rugby. He played from the age of four and it was his life ambition to play in a World Cup, to play for Wales. As a schoolboy, he was training harder than anyone, going into tackles harder than anyone. Alix and Ryan Jones were at school with me.“We’ve both been brought up on rugby, my family is a rugby family, we absolutely do not want to see the game damaged. It’s about the things that can be done around that game on a Saturday to make this a safer sport at all levels.”Safety is paramount: Ireland stand-off Johnny Sexton is treated during the Six Nations (Getty Images)Doctors estimate that Popham experienced more than 100,000 subconcussions during his career – effectively the brain reverberating in his skull as the body makes contact.“Alix has a very patchy memory of a lot of his playing career. We thought he was losing his memories but that’s not the case – his brain never stored them at the time. His brain was like a camera taking pictures without any film in.“He has no emotional memory of meeting Nelson Mandela, the proudest moment of his life. He has no emotional memory of England v Wales when Wales won at Twickenham for the first time in 20-odd years and as a result went on to win the Grand Slam.“We’ve got the medal and shirt on our wall. It was his last game for Wales. We watched that together with the children, it was on BBC Wales in lockdown, and his face was just blank. He said, ‘Nothing is coming back to me’. His memories have been pieced together through articles, match reports, YouTube videos, the jerseys and caps, what people have told him.”Popham has noi recollection of the famous 2008 England-Wales match in which he played (Getty)Since his diagnosis, Alix has gone teetotal and switched to a 95% Mediterranean diet: lots of veg, fish, only one steak permitted a week. He’s got a swimming teacher and is training to do the Tenby Ironman event that takes place in September 2022.He’ll be part of a scientific experiment, one of a squad of affected players who will be tested to assess the impact of elevated oxygen flow to the brain. Such research could pave the way for interventions that could slow the brain’s degeneration, reduce the symptoms.“Dementia has become the biggest killer in the UK. A long-term goal here is connecting the best brains in science and research to tackle this problem,” says Mel.“A bigger picture here is that there’s a lot that you and I can do as non-contact, non-professional sportspeople to future-proof our brains from dementia that I’ve learned about from the amazing people I’ve been speaking to for the last eight months.“Do three sessions of cardio exercise a week and by the age of 80 your brain will be 15 years younger. Cutting down alcohol, cutting sugar out of your diet, following the Mediterranean diet – there’s messaging there that can help people beyond those affected with this.”center_img Alix Popham dementia highlights need for Head for ChangeSeeing players take a blow to the head makes uncomfortable viewing. Yet there was something reassuring about the spate of red cards branded for dangerous challenges in last weekend’s Gallagher Premiership. It suggested that rugby is tackling the issue of concussion with the seriousness it demands.Ahead of last year’s Six Nations, I interviewed Alix Popham, the former Wales back-row who was part of the 2008 Grand Slam-winning side. Unbeknown to me, he was already displaying behavioural changes as a result of early onset dementia.Recently, I rang Popham again and this time he passed the phone to his wife, Mel. The effect of his condition meant answering my questions would require a concentration level and memory recall that he couldn’t expect to meet.“Alix was diagnosed (with dementia) in April 2020. But for about a year up until then, there were countless differences in his behaviour,” explains Mel.“His short-term memory was the most obvious, things like his concentration and filtering out noise. I thought he was going deaf but his hearing is perfect, it’s the part of his brain that filters. If the television is on and I speak to him, we have to mute the TV.”Bath’s Mike Williams (left of middle trio) makes the tackle that brought him a red card v Gloucester (Getty)There were “big situations” too, none bigger than when Alix started a kitchen fire – with the couple’s daughter in a high chair – after forgetting he’d put the grill on. When he got lost on a bike ride, following a route he’d taken hundreds of times, he broke down in frustration.“I knew there was something amiss. We’ve been friends since we were 11 years old, so we know each other’s make-up,” Mel says. “My fear when we went to the GP was that Alix had a brain tumour. How wrong I got that one. I was floored when we got the diagnosis. I’d never heard of CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy), I’m not an NFL fan.“A week after Alix’s diagnosis we went to watch Concussion, the film with Will Smith. A very, very powerful film. In hindsight, it was probably the wrong thing to do a week after the diagnosis with my stepdaughters. We all sat and sobbed. But it gave me even more impetus and motivation to know that we could do something to help.”That ‘help’ has come in the form of a new charity, Head for Change. Its mission statement is to “pioneer positive change for brain health in sport and support ex-players who are affected by neurodegenerative disease as a result of their career playing football or rugby”.The genesis for the charity was, in large part, the sense of hopelessness that Mel felt at being told her husband had a disease for which there is no cure and no treatment.Popham in action for Wales at the 2007 World Cup in France. The back-row won 33 caps (Getty Images)“I was at a complete loss for information or support, how I go about telling his daughters that he’s got dementia. And I was at that point kindly connected to Dr Judith Gates, who is the wife of Bill Gates, the retired Middlesbrough footballer (who has dementia). She supported me, gave me advice on how to deal with the children and come to terms with our situation.“She asked Alix, ‘What do you want your legacy to be?’ They’ve taken a very positive and pragmatic approach to family and that prompted us to want to do the same. And from that, May time (2020), we both had a passion for doing something good, and doing something with a charity because there was an urgent need for care and support.“For me that biggest clarity of purpose is that parent support for affected players, either diagnosis or pre-diagnosis as they go through testing. This cohort is late 30s and early 40s, these aren’t grandparents who are retired. We think of dementia as an old person’s disease but these are young men, with jobs and careers and young children. The impact on their life is huge. And that was our big call for action.”A who’s who from elite sport have offered to be ambassadors for the charity. They include Geraint Thomas, the 2018 Tour de France winner, who last year raised more than £300,000 for the NHS from a gruelling 36-hour cycling challenge.Cyclist Geraint Thomas, whose fundraising efforts last year led to the Rugby Ride Challenge (Getty Image)His efforts got Alix thinking. He’d been using Zwift, the indoor cycling app, because it was safer for him than going outdoors. He decided to create the Rugby Ride Challenge as the charity’s first fundraising event. It’s a two-day event on 6-7 March in which participants try to rack up as many miles as possible across up to six two-hour stages.More than 100 former international rugby players are taking part and everybody is encouraged to join in. In a nod to the Six Nations, the idea is to “join your country and ride with your rugby heroes” to see who will emerge top from a field of Wales, England, Scotland, Ireland and the Rest of the World.Related content: Sign up for the Rugby Ride Challenge Searching for solutions: Alix Popham is one of the ambassadors for the new charity (Hall International) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Video: Asian Rural Institute – Ecumenism meets sustainable farming

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] The Asian Rural Institute in Japan is an ecumenical training center for rural leaders. Founded in 1973, the aim of the program is to invite and train grassroots leaders to serve more effectively in their communities as they work for the poor, the hungry, and the marginalized. Episcopal Relief & Development and the United Thank Offering have provided ongoing support to the institution and several Episcopal Church missionaries and Young Adult Service Corps have served there in recent years. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Phina Borgeson says: Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET January 11, 2013 at 8:11 pm Thank you for this interesting video.I wish the Episcopal Church would get behind the ministry of Ecology Action, based in Willits, California, and developing teachers of small scale sustainable farming (“Grow Biointensive”) around the world. Rector Albany, NY Video: Asian Rural Institute – Ecumenism meets sustainable farming Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Comments (1) Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments are closed. Posted Jan 11, 2013 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ecumenical & Interreligious, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Video Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Tags Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release Featured Eventslast_img read more

Mensaje de Navidad del 2013 de la Obispa Presidente de…

first_img Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [12 de diciembre de 2013] La Obispa Presidente de la Iglesia Episcopal Katharine Jefferts Schori, en su Mensaje de Navidad del 2013 ora para: “Que usted descubra ese dominio humilde nacido de nuevo en los bordes de la conciencia del mundo. Que esa herencia real y dominio del estable, nazca en usted, alegre su corazón, y permanezca sobre sus hombros”.A continuación el mensaje de la Obispa Presidente:Mensaje de Navidad del 2013Porque un niño nos es nacido, un hijo nos es dado, y el dominio estará sobre su hombro. Se llamará su nombre: Admirable Consejero, Dios Fuerte, Padre Eterno, Príncipe de Paz. Isaías 09:06Isaías pronuncia estas palabras a un pueblo que recuerda el yugo de la esclavitud en sus hombros. Han estado esperando por este niño, cuyo nacimiento transforma ese yugo en un manto de autoridad. Se les promete que esta autoridad seguirá creciendo a medida que se establece un reino de paz – con justicia y rectitud para todos y para siempre.Esta promesa es hablada de nuevo a la gente de todas las edades, a aquellos que han vivido bajo la opresión o en la depresión oscura, a los hambrientos y enfermos y encarcelados. El nacimiento que celebramos ofrece esperanza en la Palabra hecha carne, que viene entre nosotros para sanar y recorrer este camino con nosotros. El manto del dominio sobre sus hombros comienza en los pañales de un niño nacido en la más humilde de las circunstancias. Sin embargo, ese dominio es reconocido incluso por los extranjeros que vienen de lejos. Ese manto de la autoridad sigue creciendo, a través de una vida ofrecida para los demás, planteadas en una nueva vida, y se transmite a las nuevas generaciones portadora de la carne de Dios. Dondequiera que se haga justicia y rectitud, ese dominio está creciendo, llevada en hombros del Príncipe de la Paz.Él viene otra vez, teniendo la gracia de Aquel cuya imagen Él lleva en carne. Búscalo, canta su nueva canción, declara su gloria, y habla de la buena nueva a todas las naciones: Dios reina, y Él viene trayendo  justicia y la verdad sobre sus hombros.“Que usted descubra ese dominio humilde nacido de nuevo en los bordes de la conciencia del mundo. Que esa herencia real y dominio del estable, nazca en usted, alegre su corazón, y permanezca sobre sus hombros”. Llévela afuera en paz, este año y a lo largo de los siglos.Reverendísima Katharine Jefferts SchoriObispa Presidente y PrimadaLa Iglesia Episcopal Tags Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Advent, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Posted Dec 13, 2013 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Mensaje de Navidad del 2013 de la Obispa Presidente de la Iglesia Episcopal “Que la herencia real y dominio del estable nazca en usted, alegre su corazón, y permanezca sobre sus hombros”. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

Rapidísimas

first_imgRapidísimas Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY El Tribunal Supremo de Justiciade Venezuela declaró “improcedente” el recurso de la legisladora opositora María Corina Machado contra la decisión de ese cuerpo de despojarla de su investidura parlamentaria. Razón: “No se utilizó el debido proceso legislativo”.En momentos en que se cumplen tres meses del inicio de las demostraciones estudiantiles en varias ciudades de Venezuela, la organización internacional Human Rights Watch ha hecho un largo informe en el que se menciona la situación de las cárceles en el país. Dice en parte el informe: “Las cárceles en Venezuela están entre las más violentas deAmérica Latina, allí existe una débil seguridad, infraestructuras en deterioro, hacinamiento por excesos de la población penal, guardias mal entrenados y corrupción rampante… los encargados han permitido que bandas armadas de malhechores tomen el control efectivo de las prisiones”.Un documento emitido por los obispos católicos romanos de Argentina califica la presente situación del país como “enferma de violencia”, en donde los delitos han aumentado en cantidad y agresividad. La presidenta Cristina Fernández tomó las declaraciones como una crítica a su gobierno y dijo que se “pretende reeditar viejos enfrentamientos” como los sucedidos en los años 70. Observadores opinan que este documento rompe la cordialidad que existió entre ambas instituciones desde que Mario Bergoglio, arzobispo de Buenos Aires, asumió el cargo de papa. Los argentinos consideran la seguridad personal como la principal preocupación del país.Luego de un aluvión de críticas por la realización de una misa negra satánica en el campus de la Universidad de Harvard en Cambridge, Estados Unidos, los organizadores del controvertido evento decidieron efectuarla fuera de sus instalaciones.La secta nigeriana islamista Boko Haram ha dicho que está dispuesta a canjear las casi 300 jovencitas que fueron secuestradas hace pocas semanas, por los insurgentes arrestados por las fuerzas de seguridad del país. El líder del grupo añadió en un video que las niñas en su mayoría cristianas “han sido convertidas al islam”.La Parroquia Anglicana de la Sagrada Familia en Tláhuac, estado de México, sirvió recientemente como anfitriona de una reunión con la comunidad ecuménica de Taizé. La reunión contó con jóvenes de todo México, 13 naciones de América Latina y Europa.LaComunidad de Taizées una comunidad monástica cristianaecuménica, fundada en 1940 por el teólogo suizo Roger Schutz, conocido como el Hermano Roger, en la localidad deTaizé,Francia, que continúa siendo su sede. Taizé es reconocida mundialmente como un foco deecumenismo entre los jóvenes.Aldo Vara, ex capellán del Ejército Argentino, acusado de delitos de lesa humanidad durante la dictadura ha sido encontrado en una parroquia de Ciudad del Este. Dada su edad, 80 años y su salud cumple arresto domiciliario donde trabajaba durante los tres últimos años celebrando la Eucaristía y oyendo confesiones.El Consejo Jurídico de la Iglesia Metodista Unida de Estados Unidos ha decretado que parejas del mismo sexo no pueden casarse en la iglesia pero si uno de ellos trabaja en una de las 13 agencias de la denominación puede recibir beneficios si el estado lo permite.Los que defienden la Reforma Migratoria en Estados Unidos siguen “presionando” a los políticos que se oponen ella o no toman las medidas necesarias como el presidente Barack Obama. Lo que más le duele a la comunidad indocumentada latina son las deportaciones. Janet Murguía, presidenta del Concilio Nacional de la Raza, se refirió al presidente como “El Deportador en Jefe”. El senador Bob Menéndez y los congresistas Luis Gutiérrez y Mario Díaz-Balart se han puesto contra el presidente y públicamente le han pedido “que no destruya más familias” con las deportaciones.Uhuru Kanyatta, presidente de Kenia, ha firmado una ley que autoriza la poligamia. La ley permite que un hombre pueda tener tantas mujeres como quiera siempre y cuando las pueda mantener. Kenia tiene 42 tribus y muchas no tienen límite al número de esposas que cada hombre puede tener.Un amable lector nos escribe que en una reciente nota sobre San Juan Pablo II se habla de encubrimiento de abusos sexuales y él piensa que más apropiado sería decir “supuestos” abusos sexuales. Tiene razón nuestro lector, pedimos disculpas y vaya aquí la aclaración.El gobierno de Cataluña, España, ha decidido otorgarle el Premio Cataluña al obispo anglicano jubilado de Ciudad del Cabo, Sudáfrica, por “su vigorosa y constante lucha por la justicia social”. La entrega será hecha el 3 de junio en el Palau de la Generalitat.VERDAD. Honor a quien honor merezca. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Por Onell A. SotoPosted May 15, 2014 Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY last_img read more

‘Future is bright’ for The Episcopal Church in South Carolina

first_img Comments are closed. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR South Carolina Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Fr Rob Bagwell + Savannah Georgia says: Press Release Service george cookman says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC December 4, 2014 at 3:58 pm The four Virginia congregations (including mine) who had to worship outside our property during the five years of the litigation did have the same kind of revival and continue to have that kind of revival now that our church homes have been restored to us. Woo hoo and hallelujah! Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tom Brackett says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY ‘Future is bright’ for The Episcopal Church in South Carolina Episcopalians are forming new congregations, focusing on mission Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI November 28, 2014 at 7:07 am What is the reason for this split? Does the Episcopal Church in SC believe that Jesus Christ is the only way to Salvation? Does it believe he is Lord of all? I find this all a bit confusing. Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN [Episcopal News Service – Charleston, South Carolina] The three newest mission congregations of The Episcopal Church in South Carolina worship in two United Methodist churches and a former martial arts studio next to a barbecue joint and a bar.On Nov. 15, the members of the Episcopal Church in Okatie, Episcopal Church of the Messiah in Myrtle Beach and East Cooper Episcopal Church became the sixth, seventh and eighth such congregations to have formed in the last two years. Their membership brings to 30 the number of congregations that form The Episcopal Church in South Carolina.The three newest missions’ worship arrangements are not unusual for such fledgling congregations in the Low Country of South Carolina. For instance, the Episcopal Church on Edisto began meeting in a barbecue restaurant and now shares space with New First Missionary Baptist Church, an African-American Baptist church that worships in a newer building next door.Members of the Episcopal Church of the Messiah in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina march up the aisle of Church of the Holy Communion in Charleston Nov. 15 to be welcomed as a mission congregation of the Episcopal Church in South Carolina. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENSSt. Catherine’s Episcopal Church in Florence meets in the Back Swamp Schoolhouse, a 1921 wood-frame building with neither heat nor air conditioning.St. Francis Episcopal Church in Charleston meets in a funeral home chapel, J. Henry Stuhr’s West Ashley Chapel. In October, the mission congregation held an animal blessing service at the dog park down the street.Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd in Summerville shares space with an African-American congregation, Wesley United Methodist Church, and holds Sunday school in the public library around the corner.And St. Anne’s Episcopal Church in Conway worships in the interdenominational Lackey Chapel of Coastal Carolina University.“Unlikely groups have been the most welcoming of us,” South Carolina Bishop Provisional Charles vonRosenberg told ENS.Beginning November 2012, and in some cases earlier, many Episcopalians felt forced to leave their parish homes in a dispute led by then-diocesan Bishop Mark Lawrence over policy decisions made by the wider Episcopal Church. Lawrence was deemed to have renounced his Episcopal orders.Members of the East Cooper Episcopal Church in the Charleston area accept applause at Church of the Holy Communion in Charleston Nov. 15 after being officially welcomed as a mission congregation of the Episcopal Church in South Carolina. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENSThose who wished to remain in The Episcopal Church are now part of what is known as The Episcopal Church in South Carolina. The entity has been so named since Jan. 26, 2013 in order to comply with a temporary restraining order that prevented the group from using the diocesan seal and the names “The Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of South Carolina,” “The Diocese of South Carolina” and “The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina.”“The Exodus event seems to relate to our experiences in various ways,” vonRosenberg said during his address to the church’s 224th annual convention Nov. 15. “For instance, I have heard from many of you about the sense and reality of oppression in this part of the church, in previous times. Then, a kind of separation and exodus took place. And now, people of God, we find ourselves traveling through the wilderness.”Theirs is not a barren wilderness, however, vonRosenberg said during an ENS interview prior to the convention. In addition to numerical growth, there has been spiritual growth.“There’s meaning here, which is deep and profound. It has to do with building community, knowing what is important, claiming that and wanting to go forward with that conviction,” he said. “We’re not looking back because the future is bright and what’s in the past is something that we don’t need or want to relive.”Or as Andrea McKellar, St. Francis’ senior warden, put it: “It’s been very joyful. It’s a truly resurrection experience that we went from what seemed in the first days to be the worst situation in the world to now I wouldn’t change anything about it.”These eight new worshiping communities are pilgrims, journeying towards a destination they may not yet see clearly but knowing they are committed to being Episcopalians, the bishop and others said.“There’s a holy patience” among those pilgrims, said the Ven. Calhoun Walpole, who serves as archdeacon of The Episcopal Church in South Carolina.“People know that they won’t see the fruits. There’s a deep sense that I see; a deep understanding that the harvest is not ours; that it can never be ours, it’s the Lord’s; that we are here laboring in these fields right now, laboring for future generations,” said Walpole, who is also vicar of Grace Episcopal Church in Charleston. “You boil that all down and it’s the church being the church. It’s what the church has done in every time in every generation in every place. We just have the gift of experiencing a heightened sense of that reality.”Those people who are experiencing that reality have made the sacrifice of leaving church buildings that held parts of their families’ histories and in some cases family and friends who also carried that history, vonRosenberg and Walpole said. And Walpole suggested that other sacrifices are being made as well, acknowledging that some Episcopalians have stayed in the parishes that have followed Lawrence’s lead.“I think the story that is not told for obvious reasons is the story of those people who have made the decision to stay in their respective parishes that broke away,” Walpole explained. “I believe those numbers are large and I believe those people, while they may not even use the language of ‘call’ or even ‘sacrifice,’ knowingly or unknowingly are continuing to bear witness quietly to the presence of The Episcopal Church in those parishes.”In the midst of The Episcopal Church’s reorganization in South Carolina, its members were called during the Nov. 14-15 convention to look outward, as well as inward. The convention’s theme was “Christ to the world we bring.” Its leaders wanted to start to change the church’s focus from survival to mission, while reestablishing a sense of Episcopal and Anglican identity and accountability. VonRosenberg said the leadership wants to encourage all of its congregations, and especially its start-ups, “to be recognized in the larger community for a purpose which involves the mission of Jesus.”More than 300 people attended the convention, including 77 lay delegates and 36 clergy members. Information about the work of the convention, held at Church of the Holy Communion in Charleston, is here. The Rev. Thomas Brackett, Episcopal Church missioner for new church starts and missional initiatives, conducted a series of workshops on Nov. 14 as part of that effort. The Rev. Canon Mark Stevenson, domestic poverty missioner for The Episcopal Church, also spoke to the convention.And former Southern Malawi Bishop James Tengatenga, who chairs the Anglican Consultative Council, was the preacher during the opening Eucharist. Tengatenga’s presence was meant to show the church and the wider community that, in vonRosenberg’s words during his address, “The Episcopal Church is the only recognized member of the Anglican Communion in this country.”During the business part of the convention, delegates unanimously rolled back constitutional and canonical changes made by Lawrence-led conventions to pull the church away from The Episcopal Church. Chancellor Thomas Tisdale told the convention that the Nov. 15 corrective actions had the effect of “making us a part of The Episcopal Church.”Legal work remains to be done. There are court actions focused on which group should have legal control of the Diocese of South Carolina. And while vonRosenberg and other leaders do not want to focus the Episcopalians on the court actions, those legal cases do make a claim on the organization’s attention and finances. And the bishop says they represent important work for the Episcopalians’ reorganization and their future “in this part of South Carolina.” Details about the court actions are here.Still, vonRosenberg told ENS, Episcopalians in South Carolina are telling him that “we’re not looking back because the future is bright and what’s in the past is something that we don’t need or want to relive.”Eve Pinckey, a founding member of the Episcopal Church in Okatie who now serves on its vestry, describes it this way: “We’re going to grow, grow, grow and love, love, love one another, just as we always have. It’s going to be wonderful. I can’t wait.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN November 27, 2014 at 11:51 pm I have been amazingly blessed to be able to serve as a suppliy priest in the renewed diocese and attended the Convention. May I say, I have rarely ever felt the power of the Holy Spirit as it was at the event. I heard not a negative word, not a hint of regret or anything approaching the faiint hint of any bitterness. The energy was so positive and the sentiment a blessing! How reminiscent of the text that says in the Psalms (133) “How good and pleasant it is when God’s people live together in unity!” God is gracious and great in his people! Alleluia! Cathedral Dean Boise, ID November 26, 2014 at 8:01 am Nice article, Mary Frances! I was really encouraged by the hopefulness of the leadership that I encountered there during their convention in Charleston. I remarked that the church at large has so much to learn from the Episcopal Church in South Carolina – especially in the area of stewarding hopefulness! In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Lucia Lloyd says: Kenneth Knapp says: Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 25, 2014 Comments (5) November 29, 2014 at 8:20 pm Whatever the reason for the split, it soon became a fight over money and property. It sounds like the loss of property has been good for South Carolina. We might have had the same kind of revival in Virginia if the courts had gone the other way. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME last_img read more