Phish Brings Out 20+ Minute “Disease” In Energetic Alpharetta Opener [Watch/Recap]

first_imgFor the eighth time in their career, Phish took the stage at the Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre at Encore Park in Alpharetta, GA along their 2016 fall tour. Five shows in, the tour as a whole has been heavy on the new Big Boat material, though certainly making room for a hearty serving of their classic material. Phish seems to be locked in as they go, hitting the Southeast with a gusto. How would their much anticipated return to Alpharetta fare?The band got started with “A Song I Heard The Ocean Sing,” playing the darker tune for the first time on tour. Trey Anastasio took it into a whirlwind solo, before releasing the tension with lighthearted versions of “AC/DC Bag” and “Back On The Train.” With the looseness of two groovy tracks, the rhythm section of Jon Fishman and Mike Gordon fueled a great jam out in “Blaze On.” Phish seems to be putting longer jams in the first set, and while “Blaze On” stayed within the box (aka Type I), it was evident that the band was tight-knit and having a ton of fun.Watch the official stream of “A Song I Heard The Ocean Sing” below.Gordo got to take the lead next, as the band brought out “Sugar Shack” for the first time on this tour. Trey nailed the song’s carefree melody throughout, extending it for a nice solo with some fun arpeggios. This was a longer version than usual, adding an exciting energy to the song. Page McConnell took the lead next, singing along on the peppy new Big Boat tune “Things People Do.”Next up was a rocking “Birds Of A Feather,” with Trey leading a great tension-build and release solo. This was a tight jam that kept the energy of the first set high, but it was a “Mercury” that was a real highlight of the set. Though “Mercury” didn’t appear on Big Boat, it was debuted at the same time as tunes like “Blaze On” and “No Men’s.” Now played for the second time on this tour, it’s certainly exciting to have the song in a tighter rotation. Fishman played the Marimba Lumina at times during the song’s lighter section. This was a great “Mercury,” as the band extended the version with a tight jam out at the end.“Let’s Go” came up next, another new original tune that was left off the new album. “Let’s Go” was actually the center of a discussion in the Roling Stone interview that was published today, as producer Bob Ezrin opted to leave the Gordo original off the album despite his and Trey’s objections. The upbeat number was played for only the second time, but let’s hope it stays in rotation. It’s a fun one! “Alaska” came next, treating the Alpharetta crowd to some bluesy funk. This was a raging version of “Alaska,” but the band took the mood into a sentimental place with their new song, “More.” The track came to life in the live setting, with Trey rolling out some great guitarwork to bring the song, and set, to a grand conclusion.After the break, it was Gordo that hit the opening rumbles of set two with a blistering, 21-minute version of “Down With Disease.” The jam started out with rock and roll energy and turned a corner into a more floating segment, but then curved back into some deeper bass-driven grooves. This was an exploratory “Disease,” moving into a progressive rock sound before Trey led the jam into a rock and roll call-and-response. Things only got spacier, drawing deeper into an exploratory funk before Trey moved over the Marimba Lumina and really nailed the low-end synth bombs. He eventually picked back up the guitar and rocked the opening notes of “Carini.”Watch the official stream of “Down With Disease” below.The “Carini” quickly went into an ambient jam session, as the band kept things lighthearted in a typically heavy song. The light touch continued as the group segued into Fuego track “Winterqueen,” and this was a beautiful version with a nice, soaring solo. Trey brought the song to a close with its melody, but it was Fishman that ushered in the subsequent “Ghost.” The improvisational section went from rhythmically funky to melodically uplifting, then back to slow and funky to close out the song.Page then hammered out the opening notes of “Possum,” and Trey kept the song loose and rocking. This was clearly a crowd pleaser, with the energy riding high. It was the tour debut of “Slave To The Traffic Light” that would bring the set to a close, putting a truly triumphant finale to a great set of music.For their encore, Phish closed out the show with their first cover of the night, Rolling Stones’ “Loving Cup.” Trey was absolutely shredding the ending of the song, bringing one last beautiful buzz to Alpharetta. This was a great memorable night of music from Phish, and we can’t wait to hear what they have in store for night two tomorrow.You can see the full Phish.net setlist below.Setlist: Phish at Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre at Encore Park, Alpharetta, GA – 10/21/16Set 1: A Song I Heard the Ocean Sing, AC/DC Bag > Back on the Train, Blaze On, Sugar Shack, Things People Do, Birds of a Feather, Mercury, Let’s Go, Alaska, MoreSet 2: Down With Disease > Carini > Winterqueen > Ghost > Possum > Slave To The Traffic LightEncore: Loving CupThis show was webcast via Live Phish. The Birds was quoted at the end of BOAF.last_img read more

Catherine Byrne: Palliative care a kindly end-of-life right

first_imgNZ Herald 24 June 2017Family First Comment: From a palliative care specialist who knows…“All the genuine and compassionate reasons people have for being in favour of euthanasia can be met by good palliative care and that removes the obligation for doctors – till now only concerned with enhancing life – to instead be responsible for killing people.”www.rejectassistedsuicide.org.nz• Dr Catherine Byrne is a Tauranga GP who has worked at Waipuna Hospice for 15 years. She is married and has four children. The June 10 Weekend Herald published an article by Matt Vickers, husband of Lecretia Seales, who died last year, shortly before the Health Select Committee set up an inquiry to investigate the issue of assisted dying.The article was headed by a big, beautiful and evocative photograph of the pair on their wedding day.For reasons of privacy it is not possible to publish pictures of the many people who have been helped by the care and attention they have received at Waipuna Hospice, but as a doctor who has worked there for many years, I felt I could not let this article go past without pointing out that euthanasia is not the only answer to the serious concerns people have about the end of life, nor is it the most compassionate.Death, even from cancer or other frightening diseases, does not have to be “lonely, violent and concealed from family”, nor does it have to be “excruciatingly painful”, as Governor Jerry Brown fears. The whole point of the hospice movement is to prevent those very things, by excellent medical care and by warm, compassionate psychological and social support.There is no need to legislate for euthanasia to initiate “frank and honest conversations about death” – we have these conversations every day with people at the hospice. As Vickers points out, having those conversations brings comfort and relief to people previously afraid to articulate their fears.There is no need for anyone who receives good palliative care to die in excruciating pain; nor to die with loss of autonomy or dignity. Palliative care practitioners, from nurses and doctors to cooks and cleaners, spend their whole working lives doing everything they can to prevent any suffering at the end of life, and most people who have had contact with a hospice would support that statement. The way forward with difficult deaths should be to encourage the Government to ensure every single New Zealander who needs it has access to ever-better palliative care services.Opponents of euthanasia are not “religious zealots”, primarily concerned with “vulnerable, passive victims”. They are people who care about the value of all lives, including the disabled, the mentally ill, the very young, the very old and, most of all, the very sick.Based on my own experience, the people who ask for euthanasia are not those who are in an agony of pain – that has been dealt with by good medicine. They are articulate, intelligent men and women who fear they will be a financial and emotional burden to their family and friends.The Oregon data, which Vickers quotes, shows that 61 per cent of people requesting euthanasia stated “being a burden” as their main reason for doing so. At the moment, they cannot kill themselves legally, but if they could no amount of “protective legislation” would be able to prevent them. As it is we are able to help them physically and emotionally and allow them to reach a place where they see how precious the time they all have left together can be to their family and to themselves.Vickers states how delighted Lecretia would have been to see David Seymour’s End of Life Choice Bill drawn from the ballot. This bill requests legalised euthanasia not just for those dying from a terminal illness but for anyone with “a grievous and irremediable condition who experiences unbearable suffering that cannot be relieved in a manner they consider tolerable”. This would cover just about anything from cancer to severe arthritis.With such weak criteria, anyone suffering from anything would be entitled to take their case to the Court of Human Rights to say they were being discriminated against if they were NOT allowed to be considered for assisted suicide. In Oregon in 2013, 17 per cent of those completing euthanasia did not have a terminal illness at all but suffered from chronic disease such as diabetes and depression. In Belgium the percentage of deaths due to euthanasia is rising by 15 per cent every year and already constitutes 2 per cent of all deaths – and legislation there now allows euthanasia for babies and young children as well as consenting adults.READ MORE: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?objectid=11880452&ref=twitterKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Friday marks final leaf collection in Batesville

first_imgBATESVILLE, Ind. – The final date this year for leaf collection in Batesville is set for this Friday.City officials say trash items, including bagged leaves, will be picked up with a maximum limit of four bags per household.Following Friday, residents are asked to add bagged leaves to the normal trash collection.last_img