Roosevelt Collier: Master Of The Sacred Steel, Hendrix, And Sit-Ins

first_imgRoosevelt Collier is one of the most sought after sacred steel players in the game. He is often listed as an “Artist-At-Large” on dozens of festival lineups throughout the year, playing with all the bands and artists looking to add that soulful steel sound that he graces the stage with. “I really didn’t think of myself  as being sought after. When it comes to jamming with others, I just really enjoy making music with people,” Collier explains, “I enjoy the possibilities of what could happen at any given moment.”Collier is also a Jimi Hendrix aficionado, having performed the material of the guitar god time and time again. He will once again do so this Friday night, February 24th when he, along with Dopapod’s Rob Compa (guitar) and Chuck Jones (bass), and TAUK’s Isaac Teel (drums), perform a special tribute to Hendrix’s Band of Gypsy’s-era material at American Beauty in New York City (purchase tickets here).We decided to take a look at some memorable collaborations from Collier’s career, and it is like a “Who’s Who” of incredible artists. A cover of “Little Wing” with none other than Oteil Burbridge, Kofi Burbridge, Jeff Sipe, and Count M’Butu? Yeah, that happened. Rocking out to “Voodoo Child” with Warren Haynes in Miami at a late-night show, or sitting in with Anders Osborne on The Band‘s “When I Paint My Masterpiece.” Then there was that time at Bear Creek in 2012 when he joined Skerik and Mike Dillon’s Dead Kenny G’s project, along with George Porter Jr. and Billy Martin. Or rocking out to JJ Cale’s “Ride Me High” with Widespread Panic and Bobby Lee Rodgers in 2013.There is a reason Roosevelt Collier is one of the most respected musicians in the scene today. Last year on Jam Cruise, he hosted his own super jam on the main stage, which brought out a laundry list of artists that include Paul Hoffman and Anders Beck of Greensky Bluegrass, Eric Krasno, Snarky Puppy, Dumpstaphunk, Fred Wesley, Ron Holloway, Nigel Hall, Eric McFadden, Todd Stoops and many more. And then, just last week, there was the performance of “Spanish Castle Magic” from the legend’s 1967 Axis: Bold As Love album. Take a look at a few of these aforementioned performances below.[courtesy of Barry2theB][courtesy of CHeeseHeaDPRoDuCTioNS][courtesy of FunkItBlog][courtesy of CHeeseHeaDPRoDuCTioNS][courtesy of Mountain Jam Festival][courtesy of FunkItBlog]Tickets for Roosevelt Collier’s Band of Gypsy’s Tribute are currently on-sale and can be purchased here. Local NYC jammers Dorsia will be providing support for the performance. For show updates and additional information, check out the Facebook Event page.last_img read more

Free Manure?

first_imgUsing animal manure to amend garden and landscaping soil was common practice 20 years ago. Today, University of Georgia Extension agents, like myself, discourage it.In the past, manure was considered a great soil amendment to add to gardens and was considered a good source of natural “organic” nutrients as an alternative to synthetic fertilizers. Today, it is nearly impossible to find a manure source that doesn’t contain herbicide residues, which ironically defeats the purpose of trying to be an organic gardener. Free isn’t always freeMost backyard gardeners don’t give much thought to where their “free” manure comes from, aside from the obvious source. The vast majority of farmers spray their hayfields and pastures with herbicides to control broadleaf weeds. The same applies to hay used as mulch. Today’s hay customers expect weed-free sources of hay for their animals and farmer’s must meet the demand of their customers. Today’s herbicides have low toxicity to humans and animals. Man of these herbicides can be sprayed one day and the animals can graze safely the next day, but the problem is many herbicides used today also have long-lasting residual activity — meaning they remain active on the mulch or in the manure after you put them into your garden.Free pesticidesSome commonly used products are known to last as long as 8 to 12 months in the soil or on stored hay. Herbicide residues also remain active on forage hay fed to livestock and grass clippings from sprayed lawns. If you spray your lawn for weeds, don’t put your grass clippings in your garden or compost bin. These herbicides are very good at what they do: kill broadleaf weeds without killing grass. Unfortunately, these products don’t know the difference between a weed, a flower, a tomato plant or vegetable plants growing in your garden.The type of manure used in your garden doesn’t matter either. Whether the manure comes from horses, cattle, alpacas, goats or other livestock, there’s a chance they could have been exposed to an herbicide. Even if the livestock owner doesn’t spray his pastures, hay purchased to feed the animals could have been sprayed. More often than not, customers who buy high quality hay for animals want it to be as weed-free as possible. You can assume that any hay that is mostly weed-free has been treated with an herbicide. Alfalfa is typically the only forage hay that will not have been sprayed since most broadleaf herbicides cannot be sprayed without damaging the crop, too. If livestock owners only feed alfalfa hay to their animals and don’t spray their pastures, the manure could safely be used in your garden. However, most livestock owners also feed grass hays such as fescue, bermudagrass and orchard grass that are likely sprayed for weeds. Hay can be suspect, tooBefore using hay from a farmer, ask if the fields were sprayed and what type of hay they feed their animals. Otherwise, assume all hay has been sprayed with an herbicide and the resulting manure will damage your garden.If you’ve already incorporated manures or hay mulches into your garden, watch your vegetables very closely for unusual symptoms. Tomatoes are very sensitive to herbicide damage and are often the first indicator of a problem. Affected tomatoes will have extreme leaf curling and the stems will be twisted. Usually, the newest growth on the plant is the first to show these symptoms. For assistance in identifying a plant disease or insect problem, bring a leaf sample your local UGA Extension office for assistance or call 1-800-AskUGA-1.last_img read more

Gateshead’s big match

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NFL faces tough times for 2020, then bright economic outlook

first_img SUBSCRIBE TO US COMMENT Associated Press Television News First Published: 2nd September, 2020 07:54 IST WATCH US LIVE LIVE TVcenter_img Last Updated: 2nd September, 2020 07:54 IST NFL Faces Tough Times For 2020, Then Bright Economic Outlook Let’s get this straight from the outset: If the NFL has no fans at any games this season — or doesn’t have much of a season at all — it will not go out of business Let’s get this straight from the outset: If the NFL has no fans at any games this season — or doesn’t have much of a season at all — it will not go out of business.Sure, the 32 teams and the league itself will lose millions, very possibly billions of dollars. Its broadcast partners will take a hit harder than any that Von Miller has delivered on the field. Same for sponsors and advertisers who pinpoint pro football as the best way to reach fans (read: consumers).And unless the coronavirus pandemic stretches beyond the 2020 season, the NFL will come out right where it has been for decades: on top of the sports world.“The NFL is to the sports and entertainment industry the way Amazon is to the retail industry,” says Marc Ganis, co-founder of Chicago-based consulting group Sportscorp and a confidant of many NFL owners.“We need to look at this as an overarching umbrella: This has a likelihood of being a one-season problem. So as we get to the 2021 season, the problem will have gone away, so it is a one-year aberration.“There’s a semi-permanent impact (on other industries) I don’t see for the NFL. I see the NFL coming back stronger than ever for two reasons:— “The value of the NFL for non-attendance activity. Broadcasting, gambling, Internet, video gaming, those all need the NFL more than ever before. The kinds of people and consumer activities it attracts, it will come back more strong.— “The new CBA with the players, the 11 years of labor peace. When it was approved in March there were a host of high-profile players saying they were against it, in large measure because they didn’t see a rush to do it so quickly. They were as wrong as anybody could ever be. You just don’t know what tomorrow will bring, so get it done when you can get it done.”Getting done the biggest chunk of NFL revenues, new broadcast deals, is on the horizon, too. From network TV to cable to satellite to radio to streaming rights, the NFL is likely to fill its vaults with untold riches even with the overall U.S. economy struggling.First, of course, there is the COVID-19-impacted 2020 season, and the financials won’t be pretty even if the entire regular season and playoffs go off as scheduled. Certainly not with empty stadiums across the nation — less than a dozen teams are likely to have fans on hand this season, barring a turnaround in the pandemic that no one in the medical community is predicting.If games are canceled, or the playoffs and Super Bowl need to be moved back in the calendar, the monetary effect will be substantial — felt perhaps the most by NFL marketing partners.“The general consensus is nobody is completely jumping ship right now,” says Mark Reino, CEO of Merit Mile, a Boca Raton, Fla.-based advertising, PR and sports marketing agency.”However, no one is signing the level of lucrative contracts they signed in previous years. They are still assessing and trying to understand how these dynamics will play out. We are not even sure where this is going to take us. Most of us expect the NFL to play a season, but it could take a different turn.”Naturally, corporate sponsors need that visibility to drive a lot of initiatives … but they’re not eager to make the aggressive moves given the current situation.“The fan base is hungry, and if the teams can figure out the right way to package up corporate sponsorship value and deliver unique ideas to the advertisers and corporate sponsors, they will be OK. This will be a unique year, and everybody will take hits, but those who have progressive thinkers likely will win. And teams with ownership interest in their stadiums will have much more opportunity to capitalize than those that don’t.”That’s a common theme.The Dolphins, who have announced plans to have about 13,000 fans at Hard Rock Stadium for their home opener in Week 2 against Buffalo, already have gotten creative.Owner Stephen Ross and his staff came up with an idea that met with raised eyebrows: turning the stadium into a drive-in theater.Similar to Ganis, Reino suggests there will be other potential programs in tangential areas of sports marketing, such as gambling and online betting — once taboo in NFL circles.“Rest assured all 32 teams have some sort of task force on how they will monetize online betting as soon as it is approved nationwide,” Reino says.How about providing season ticket holder’s extra value such as access to players socially distanced and on an experimental basis?“These are the ideas that all of a sudden rise to the concept state because it is 2020 and where we are in 2020,” Reino adds.So where is the NFL in 2020, at least financially? Like nearly every other business in America — and certainly like all sports — it’s in a tough spot. Teams could afford recent contracts such as the megabucks given to Patrick Mahomes and Joey Bosa under normal circumstances.Because of economic effects from the pandemic, future player deals and a salary cap that will be adjusted due to some monetary setbacks, upcoming free agents might find the marketplace tighter.But to hold a bake sale — well, something a bit larger — to aid the NFL won’t be necessary.“There are activations being planned that are different from what we have seen in the past,” Ganis says. “Auto companies are planning on major sponsorship activations; Americans always need to buy cars. There is a major plan for much more production by manufacturers and they have to get the cars out the door. Auto companies are major team sponsors.“Airline sponsorships will be a problem, and the NFL has a deal, as do each of the teams. Anything travel-related is a problem.“But there is so much interest in the NFL coming back in broadcasting and digital, and all the ancillary programming and fantasy leagues and sports gambling. Nobody wants to leave the NFL right now. ”Image credits: AP Written By FOLLOW USlast_img read more

How Kobe Bryant helped connect Asian Americans with both Asia and America

first_imgKobe Bryant storiesKobe Bryant was proud advocate for women’s basketballPurple and gold lights from LA to NY and beyond signal superstar’s lossKobe Bryant lives on in inspired murals dotting Southern CaliforniaThe best of Kobe Bryant’s legends and tall tales with the LakersHere are the 8 people who died in the helicopter crash with Kobe Bryant AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersSouthern California’s Asian American and Pacific Islander community grew significantly in the 2000s, just as Bryant reached his peak with the Lakers. For many in the community trying to find their place in the ever-sprawling region, Bryant was their gateway to Southern California and its culture, to a classroom with few immigrant peers, to a family divided by generations or continents.And with the news of his death and eight others on Sunday, Jan. 26, in a helicopter crash in the Calabasas hills, several said they still find themselves mourning days later.“Kobe was our guy,” Josh Chung, 26, of Los Angeles, said. “Now, it’s all gone.”Complete coverage: Kobe Bryant helicopter crashIn 2000, Kim was dropped into foreign surroundings when his family moved from South Korea. He hadn’t watched many Laker games in Korea, but in Burbank he found new friends as he fell in love with the team just “when Kobe and Shaq were going nuts.” Southern California is “self-segregated,” he said, “there’s nothing that really holds it together other than sports.”And, you didn’t have to be a kid to find a lifeline in Bryant. Tung said her grandmother emigrated from Taiwan to the United States in the mid-1990s. Ready to move beyond the safety of a familiar mahjong club, her grandmother gravitated toward watching Laker games, Tung said.“She would relate to the small guys because my grandmother used to be a small guard too,” Tung said. “And she really, really appreciated that Kobe makes most of his free throws.”Her grandmother doesn’t know English well – she calls players by their numbers – but she and Tung can connect watching and talking about the Lakers.“It’s really been a connecting tissue,” she said.Shanahan came to the United States from the Philippines when she was 4 and has lived in Long Beach ever since. She remembers when Bryant visited the island country in 1998, dancing with the locals and checking out basketball courts.“It really helped the Filipino community feel close to him,” Shanahan said. “We don’t have a lot of prevalent icons, so he kind of felt like that for many of us.”Chung said he also saw a dedication in Bryant that resonated with him and a lot of his friends.“We grew up with people telling us, whether parents or coaches, you have to work hard,” he said, “and that’s that immigrant narrative that a lot of us saw in Kobe.” With limited English, 10-year-old James Kim broke the ice at lunch with his new classmates talking about Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O’Neal, and how they took the Los Angeles Lakers to the championships in 2001.Now living in Long Beach, cheering for Bryant was how Anne Milo Shanahan’s family still connected with cousins back home in the Philippines.PreviousThe ferris wheel at the Santa Monica Pier is lit in purple and gold in honor of LA Lakers legend Kobe Bryant on Tuesday, January 28, 2020.(Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer)Laker fans gather in front of a mural of Kobe Bryant on the 1300 block of Lebanon Street across from the LA Convention center in Los Angeles Monday, January 27, 2020. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)LOS ANGELES, CA – JANUARY 28: Fans leave condolence message on boards to pay their respects to Kobe Bryant and his daughter Gianna, 13, at a memorial set up outside of Staples Center on January 28, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. Kobe his daughter Gianna, were among nine people killed in a helicopter crash on January 26 in Calabasas, California. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JANUARY 28: Fans gather to pay their respects to Kobe Bryant at LA Live on January 28, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JANUARY 28: Items left by fans to pay their respects to Kobe Bryant at LA Live on January 28, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JANUARY 28: Fans shoot baskets at a memorial wall near Staples Center in honor of former NBA great Kobe Bryant who, along with his 13-year-old daughter Gianna, died January 26 in a helicopter crash, on January 28, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. Kobe and “Gigi” were among nine people killed in the crash in Calabasas, California as they were flying to his Mamba Sports Academy in Thousand Oaks, where he was going to coach her in a tournament game. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)People mourn Kobe Bryant outside of the Staples Center in Los Angeles, Tuesday, January 28, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The ferris wheel at the Santa Monica Pier is lit in purple and gold in honor of LA Lakers legend Kobe Bryant on Tuesday, January 28, 2020.(Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer)Laker fans gather in front of a mural of Kobe Bryant on the 1300 block of Lebanon Street across from the LA Convention center in Los Angeles Monday, January 27, 2020. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 7Laker fans gather in front of a mural of Kobe Bryant on the 1300 block of Lebanon Street across from the LA Convention center in Los Angeles Monday, January 27, 2020. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)ExpandAnd, watching the basketball legend run the court on television with her 90-year-old grandmother are special memories for Yvette Tung.“That’s what you talked to people about,” Tung, 38, of Hacienda Heights, said. “All of a sudden, you have integrated. You’re in LA now.”center_img “It was always the topic of conversation you can bring up to people,” Kim said. “Our core friend group was white kids, Mexican kids, half-Asian kids, but we were religiously following Kobe. That was really what tied us together.”“Ask a Korean” blogger who writes under the pen name T.K. Park moved to Cerritos from Korea as a 10th grader in 1996, just as rookie Bryant was emerging with the Lakers.“Just starting conversation was so much easier. You had to just talk about the Lakers,” said Park, who now lives on the East Coast. “It’s like magic, where you have to say a certain word and you gain admission into the society.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more