Saint Mary’s hosts autism intervention workshop

first_imgSaint Mary’s hosted nearly 600 participants Friday in its Introduction to Pivotal Response Treatment workshop in O’Laughlin Auditorium. Courtesy of Michael Waddell Bob Koegel, a researcher who developed Pivotal Response Treatment, addresses attendees of Saint Mary’s workshops aimed at promoting awareness and fostering education about autism.Stanford University researchers Bob and Lynn Koegel, who developed Pivotal Response Treatment — an approach to autism intervention that targets certain aspects of development, rather than individual behaviors — provided level-one certification for participants upon completion of the workshop. “One of the things that’s really important in this community is that we have a lot of really talented people who are thirsting for knowledge about the most cutting-edge approaches to working with individuals with autism,” Master of Autism Studies faculty fellow Joshua John Diehl, said. “And so, by setting up something like this, it’s creating opportunities that this community wouldn’t otherwise have.” This event was made possible by collaboration among the Master of Autism Studies program, the department of communicative sciences and disorders, LOGAN Autism Services — a learning center that offers education and resources to individuals with developmental disabilities — Special Friends of Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s and the Students Supporting Autism group. Pivotal Response Treatment provided the workshop free-of-cost and only required registration to partake in the training, Diehl said. “If any individual that came to this conference were to want to get this training, it would cost them about $3,000 apiece,” Diehl said. “So the fact that we can get so many people trained and enrich people from all different disciplines, it makes a huge impact on the community.”Diehl said the financial burden lifted by this workshop contributed to the incredible turnout. “As far as I know — and I have talked to people at LOGAN, and I have been here for a decade — there has never been disability-related training of this magnitude in this area ever,” Diehl said. “The number of people that attended and were affected at no cost is just phenomenal.”Director of the Master of Autism Studies program, Michael Waddell, said he was aware there would be community interest, but the turnout almost doubled what he had anticipated. “All of the reports that I received [Friday] talking to people during the event and after the event indicated that they had a really good experience, that they enjoyed being on campus at Saint Mary’s and that they thought this training would be very beneficial for them in their various schools and clinics and other organizations in the community,” Waddell said. In having a larger turnout than first anticipated, event planning needed to account for potential difficulties, Waddell said.  “There was an awful lot of thought and planning that went into the event, and we tried to anticipate every kind of problem that might arise,” he said. “Because there was so much thought put into the planning, I think we had measures in place to address just about every need that there was.” Waddell said while the particular benefit to the participants varies, he sees two major benefits that attendees received. “I think for some people, it was really beneficial to understand the sort of theory that underpins Pivotal Response Treatment, and then to be introduced to the scientific evidence base for the success of that theory in providing autism intervention,” Waddell said. “For other people in the audience, what was probably most beneficial was the fact that in addition to giving us the theoretical underpinnings and the scientific evidence for the efficacy of Pivotal Response Treatment, the Koegels also gave a lot of concrete, practical suggestions about ways that you could implement Pivotal Response Treatment in schools, in clinics, even in home and out in the community.”Pivotal Response Treatment in particular has a “broad applicability,” Diehl said, as it acknowledges both the needs of both young children and adults. “What’s great about this particular approach is that it comes across disciplines in a language that people can communicate across disciplines,” Diehl said. “Not only that, but it is a kind of approach that can be used by family and loved ones in their work with their loved one who has autism.”Waddell said this program fills a need created by the increasing diagnoses of autism in children. In the future, the Master of Autism Studies program intends to continue to host a couple workshops a year to address this growing need, he said. “In a situation where autism is becoming common in society, obviously there is tremendous need for understanding autism and providing the best services for autistic people and their families,” Waddell said. “The only way that that is possible is if we are providing the best training and the best education about autism and about autism interventions. So really, this is something which is an essential part of responding to the social phenomena of increasing need for understanding and serving autistic individuals and their families.”Tags: koegel, LOGAN, Logan autism services, logan center, master of science in autism, pivotal response treatmentlast_img read more

Vermont Public Television plans new magazine show

first_imgVermont Public Television, Vermont’s statewide public television network, is making plans for a new, locally produced magazine program on air and online with the working title ‘Green Mountain Guide.’ VPT aims for an early 2012 launch of a weekly showcase for interesting people, regional culture, outdoor experiences, local history and important public issues.  Audiences will notice a few other changes to VPT’s production landscape. The call-in program ‘Public Square’ will not return this fall. While VPT plans to continue its examination and discussion of important issues, they will be handled during the magazine show or through more prominent special reports.VPT will continue to broadcast its venerable interview program, ‘Profile,’ each week but does not plan to produce new episodes for the fall. ‘‘Profile’ has introduced us to some fascinating people,’ Scott said, ‘but after a decade in production, we want to change things up. This doesn’t mean we will end our conversations with interesting people or our long relationship with ‘Profile’ host Fran Stoddard. There will be room for both in VPT’s new local production plans.’ ‘We know Vermonters love Vermont,’ said Kathryn A. Scott, chief content officer for VPT, ‘And we know our audiences have a real thirst for information and entertainment that enlightens and enriches their understanding of the world. With ‘Green Mountain Guide,’ we hope to give them a slice of what they crave: even greater knowledge and appreciation of the people, places and ideas that make Vermont unique.’‘We intend to offer a combination of timely reports, in-depth conversations and fascinating stories you won’t find anywhere else,’ Scott said. VPT hopes to make the ‘Green Mountain Guide’ a permanent part of its lineup but will begin with a short-term commitment and then assess audience response and options for longer-range support.‘Green Mountain Guide’ will be just part of a new approach at VPT. ‘We want to get even more from our production efforts around the region,’ Scott said. ‘We are mindful that our supporters literally invest in our efforts, so our team works hard to be practical, frugal and nimble in our approach to storytelling.’‘We are more than a statewide television network. VPT provides an extensive public media system which can help people make real, human connections throughout New England,’ Scott said. ‘Vermonters are active people with busy lives. We need to offer our content where and when it’s convenient for them. For example, we routinely make our programs available online or out in the community, sometimes even before airing them on TV.’New projects in the pipeline include a focus on some of Vermont’s summer music workshops and festivals, including the KoSA International Percussion Workshop, the Manchester Music Festival, the Vermont Youth Orchestra and Grace Potter’s Grand Points North festival. Short video stories from these events will air during local slots that are part of the new PBS Arts Fall Festival beginning in October. Expanded versions will appear in ‘Green Mountain Guide’ and a locally produced performance special.Also coming in October, VPT-produced stories about bootleggers and rum-runners in Vermont will debut as companions to ‘Prohibition,’ a new PBS film from Ken Burns and Lynn Novick. Then, new episodes of VPT’s award-winning ‘Emerging Science’ will kick off PBS Science Wednesdays to complement new seasons of ‘NOVA’ and ‘Nature.’This approach is designed to make it easier for audiences to find new content right next to similar programs they already enjoy. It also will give VPT a chance to cover many more topics without the heavy commitments required when undertaking lengthier documentaries or single-subject series.VPT. 9.14.2011last_img read more

Zorn’s Rebuilding its Bethpage Location

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Zorn’s, Long Island’s most famous hometown chicken and turkey restaurant, is rebuilding its original roost in Bethpage, where its first location opened 78 years ago.The take-out and catering business is breaking ground later this year on a new 8,000-square-foot building on the western side of its current location at 4321 Hempstead Tpke., the company said. It is borrowing several million to fund the transformation. The new location will include a small dining area, an addition Zorn’s attributed to popular demand.“We will continue to serve up our well-loved traditional recipes,” said Merrill S. Zorn, the company’s CEO. “Everything you have come to know and love about Zorn’s—our quality, freshness and friends staff—will not change”Merrill’s grandfather, Peter Zorn, founded the business in 1940. The current Zorn’s of Bethpage building will remain open throughout the construction of the new structure. Once the new building opens early next year, all employees will be shifting there.“Our Zorn’s of Bethpage family looks forward to continuing to serve your family as we embark on this exciting new chapter in our history,” said Merrill Zorn.last_img read more

Educating young entrepreneurs into a worthwhile investment

first_img 176SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Carolyn Eagen Carolyn Eagen is an Account Executive with Sogeti USA, a Capgemini Group Company. Carolyn and Sogeti help clients identify a best practice approach to complex business challenges through advanced technology … Web: www.us.sogeti.com Details Educating Young Entrepreneurs into a Worthwhile InvestmentIt seems every article you read these days is about how Millennials, or the even newer Generation Z’s, are making waves in the market place. Business leaders all know by now that their members, peers and fellow professionals are quickly evolving into a new breed of fast-paced, entrepreneurial idealists. Just google the word “millennial” and over 2,000,000 news articles will flash before your eyes, but how can businesses actually be proactive and adapt to this inevitability? How can community banks transform the way they do business to embrace the millennial mentality?The answer is about embracing the egocentric. Credit Unions have the opportunity to shift their marketing efforts from member-focused to business-focused, attracting loyal members through education, empowerment and genuine value.Millennials are often generalized by their desire for fast, reliable answers…so give them exactly that! Empower young members and future members with the knowledge to make smart investment decisions and you will grow an entrepreneur worth investing in.Here are a few ways you can get started with education-based marketing to attract and grow your millennial market:Grassroots events and workshopsGet to know the next generation of small business owners by offering free trainings for young professionals and striving entrepreneurs. Focus in on specific demographics by catering topics to fit your business objectives. For example, if you are looking to attract new SBA loan applicants, consider hosting a workshop on how to fill out SBA applications or business plan basics. By honing in on specific challenges that young professionals face and can’t easily find the answer to online will help guarantee attendance of your target audience. Struggling to put together the resources to develop your own educational workshop series? Partner with local community programs that are already advocating your message. Your support will have a positive impact on the community and attract those same striving small business owners and young investors with less lift required.Webinars, YouTube and other video resourcesThe term “thought leadership” is one that gets thrown around almost as often as “millennials” but it is a coveted term among organizations and professionals for good reason. Thought leaders are synonymous with trusted advisors to millennials because they can be relied upon for truthful and often fast information. By placing video assets in the hands of members, you are providing them with the opportunity to learn at their leisure, on their own schedule. Consider how valuable an education based webinar series or mini YouTube series could help you create the millennial traction you are seeking. It is important to keep in mind that new member-focused marketing when developing these video assets. In order to captivate your target audience, your video needs to provide value for them beyond when your credit union was founded. A good rule of thumb before investing in the creation of any digital assets is to ask “Why would millennials watch this?” The answer should always be “To help themselves do XYZ.”Self-Service Insights Millennials and Gen Z’s are all about self-service. They are reliant on knowledge and resources available so why not give it to them on their terms? Empower millennials with the tools to better understand their own financial state then guide them down a path to secure a loan for their startup business or buy their first home with your help. With the rise of millennial consumers, big banks have embraced this self-service generation by pushing out consumer-facing analytics and allowing members to explore their own financial data. By empowering millennials with insights into their own financial state, credit unions are grooming this new generation to be more active and loyal members. Offering this type of self-service insights requires the help of business analytics professionals but there are less customized tools that you can offer consumers. An easy place to start may be to exploring innovative tools like Hip Pocket, which helps your members and prospects to make informed investment decisions without the help of a member services representative.Education-based marketing isn’t just for attracting millennial markets, it is a trend that is driving investment decisions across demographics. Building trust through empowerment and thought leadership is the real wave that is disrupting the marketplace.It is true that providing true value in marketing efforts will require more work from the business than simply plastering your name and a catchy slogan on billboards all throughout town but with it comes a much greater return as well. As credit unions, it is especially important for you to embrace education-based marketing to mentor future small business owners. With the rise of entrepreneurial millennials and the trend of “retirement businesses” for baby boomers looking to finally open that store they’ve dreamed of for decades, credit unions can help themselves to reduce the risk in financially supporting startups by educating their proprietors. There is no silver bullet for predicting new small business success rates but investing in educated entrepreneurs is a good start.Be a vehicle for the Millennials and the next generation of your local business owners in your community.last_img read more

Gerindra to reappoint Prabowo as chairman in extraordinary congress on Saturday

first_imgGerindra secretary-general Ahmad Muzani has said that the party is set to reappoint Prabowo Subianto as its chairman in the upcoming extraordinary congress, which is to be held at Prabowo’s residence in Hambalang, Bogor, West Java, on Saturday.”This is the result of the previous national leadership meeting, where 34 Regional Representatives Council [DPD] members asked for Prabowo’s willingness to lead the party [again] in the next five years,” Muzani said on Thursday evening, as quoted by tempo.co.The national leadership meeting, which was conducted on June 4, also resulted in a decision to hold the extraordinary meeting both offline and online amid the ongoing health crisis. Read also: PSI, Gerindra join PDI-P in backing Jokowi’s son for Surakarta mayoraltyThose attending the congress in person, however, would be asked to undergo a swab test first to make sure they were free from the coronavirus, Muzani said, adding that they were also required to comply with health protocol during the meeting by wearing face masks and keeping a distance from one another. “We’d like to thank the Health Ministry for facilitating the swab testing for the congress participants,” he said.In addition to appointing the party’s chairman for the 2020-2025 term, the congress will also have Prabowo deliver the accountability report of the party’s central executive board.Prabowo, who is also the defense minister, has led Gerindra since 2014, replacing then-chairman Suhardi, who passed away in August 2014. (vny)Topics :last_img read more

Dodgers add the free-agent outfielder of their choice — A.J. Pollock

first_img“I think a big focus for us this offseason was ‘How do you achieve more consistency?’ … We think A.J. fits in really well with that, not just in 2019 but as we look ahead.”Dodgers manager Dave Roberts indicated there will be fewer of the “line change” platoon lineups with the addition of Pollock as an “every-day” presence in the lineup.“I don’t think you go out and sign a player like that to even bring in the word ‘platoon,’” Roberts said. “I think he’s going to play, he’s going to play every day. But the idea of giving him days off, getting ahead of things with the rigors of a long season — I think that’s something that I’m going to have a conversation with him.” PreviousLos Angeles Dodger pitcher Joe Kelly speaks to fans during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)New Los Angeles Dodgers’ AJ Pollack, center, with president Andrew Friedman, left, and manager Dave Roberts holds up his new jersey during a press conference during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Justin Turner, and Corey Seager during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsFormer Los Angeles Dodger pitcher Fernando Valenzuela signs autographs during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Angel Rodriguez shows off his art work on his head during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodger pitcher Joe Kelly speaks to fans during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Fans pose for pictures on home plate during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)A Justin Turner fan wearing a red beard waits for him to make an appearance during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)A small Dodger dog during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Kenley Jensen shakes hands with fans during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)New Los Angeles Dodgers’ AJ Pollack, right, with president Andrew Friedman, left, tries on his new jersey during a press conference during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)New Los Angeles Dodgers’ AJ Pollack, left, speak with president Stan Kasten during a press conference during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman during a press conference for AJ Pollack during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Former Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Fernando Valenzuela, second from right, along with Jaime Jarrin, right, speak to fans during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Kenley Jensen speaks to the media during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers fans during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Former Los Angeles Dodger pitcher Fernando Valenzuela signs autographs during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Two year old Sophia Sanchez of Los Angeles high fives the Dodger mascot during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Kenley Jensen shakes hands with fans during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Fans pose with the Dodger mascot during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Kenta Maeda speaks to the media during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Fans pose with the Dodger mascot during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Kenley Jensen during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)New Los Angeles Dodgers’ AJ Pollack during a press conference during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodger pitcher Joe Kelly speaks to fans during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)New Los Angeles Dodgers’ AJ Pollack, center, with president Andrew Friedman, left, and manager Dave Roberts holds up his new jersey during a press conference during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 24New Los Angeles Dodgers’ AJ Pollack, center, with president Andrew Friedman, left, and manager Dave Roberts holds up his new jersey during a press conference during Dodger Stadium Fanfest at Dodger Stadium on Saturday, January 26, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)ExpandLOS ANGELES — A.J. Pollock donned a Dodgers cap and jersey for the first time Saturday, posing for photos as his signing with the team became official.And he also confirmed what many had suspected — he is not Bryce Harper.“Honestly I’m just concentrating on being the best version of myself I can,” Pollock said when asked about the unsigned free-agent outfielder aspirationally linked to the Dodgers all winter, a more expensive purchase the team has declined to make.“He’s a great player. That’s not a question for me. I’m just going to come in here and just do my part to help this team win a ton of ballgames.” Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Pollock has had a difficult time staying in the lineup over the past five seasons. He has played more than 113 games just once in that time due to a series of injuries.“I feel like most of my injuries — a lot of them were impact injuries, kind of freak stuff,” Pollock said. “I feel like I do a really good job of keeping my body in shape. I just have to keep trusting the process. I know some things haven’t gone my way as far as injuries, but absolutely, a lot of my injuries weren’t really overuse, just some freak stuff. I’m not even thinking about injuries. I’m ready to go.”Friedman said the Dodgers analyzed Pollock’s injuries — a broken thumb in 2018 while diving for a fly ball, a groin injury in 2017, a fractured elbow in 2016 on a diving slide at home plate and a broken hand in 2014 when hit by a pitch — and came to the same conclusion as Pollock.“Obviously he’s missed some time over the last few years and as we dug into it the question is ‘Is it predictive as you look forward?’” Friedman said. “As he said, most of them have been impact-type injuries. He’s had one soft-tissue injury. Then you get into how well a guy takes care of himself. How clean does he live, eat, and those things that factor into player health.“As we dug into it we felt good that he does everything he possibly can to stay on the field.”Pollock said as his free-agent winter played out he told his agent to do everything he could to keep the Dodgers in play.“I’m not going to lie, we were looking at the Dodgers the whole time and just thinking ‘That’s just a great fit. We love the team. We know them really well and there are a lot of familiar faces,’” Pollock said. “Honestly, when things got close, I talked to my agent over here, Brian Peters, and just said ‘Don’t lose the Dodgers I want to play there.’ And it worked out.”It worked out with a contract that includes plate-appearances markers that could allow Pollock to opt out after his third season or give him a player option that could extend the deal for five years and $60 million. It was a creative approach that allowed the Dodgers to keep their projected 2019 payroll under the competitive-balance tax threshold for a second consecutive season — something that Friedman called “beneficial” but not necessarily a primary aim.“I think right now we’re solving for being the best team we can be, both short term and long term and trying to balance that with the players we have right now with how the landscape looks going forward,” he said, saying he was “not sure” if the Dodgers would stay under the tax threshold as the rest of the offseason plays out.“Obviously we’ve got a very mature, full payroll. Next year we have a lot more flexibility in that respect. I think it’s always balancing that and not putting yourself in position where you potentially fall off a cliff. I think that’s one thing we’ve done pretty well — maintain a high level. And that’s something that’s easier said than done. There’s a lot of history in the last 10 years of some large revenue teams taking big dips down and trying to build back up. We’re trying to do everything we can do to avoid that.”center_img Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire The Dodgers expect his part to involve anchoring an outfield that can be “elite” defensively and making their lineup less vulnerable to left-handed pitching than it often was over the past three seasons.“As we looked ahead to 2019 and beyond, we’ve got a number of left-handed hitters that are under control for a while and have some left-handed hitters coming,” Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman said Saturday. “We didn’t have as much from the right side and as we looked at 2019 specifically, we felt we were going to be a very dynamic offensive team against right-handed pitching. Against left-handed pitching we weren’t going to be quite as good.Related Articles Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco last_img read more