String Cheese Shares Three New Studio Tracks, Details Plan For Future Instantaneous Releases

first_imgAfter months of anticipation, new music from The String Cheese Incident has finally been released! The band has shared a lengthy note detailing the process, which sees the group building their own studio called the SCI Sound Lab, and releasing three new tracks from the mix.The note talks about how the traditional album release process was a slowed down version of what they wanted to do; put new music in the hands of listeners. They had written something like 20 songs in May of 2015, and the Song In My Head album release only captured a small sampling from those new songs and road-tested originals.Instead of that process, the band has built their own studio, allowing them to record and share tracks at a much quicker pace. With that in mind, the group has shared SCI Sound Lab Vol. 1, featuring three new studio cuts: Michael Kang’s “Believe,” Bill Nershi’s “Down a River,” and the familiar song, “Sweet Spot” by Keith Moseley.You can find the new music here, and read the band’s full message below.last_img read more

Organic Entrepreneurship

first_imgBalancing academic coursework with a job is a challenge many University of Georgia students face, but for students in the new Organic Horticulture Entrepreneurship class, their classwork is both academic and economic.This semester is also harvest season for the four horticulture students in the class, who are gaining experience planning, planting and marketing crops through a weekly student farmers market.Taught by Associate Professor David Berle and Professor Tim Coolong in the Department of Horticulture, the new course in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) allows students to learn the process of growing their own produce and build the interpersonal communication skills necessary sell their crops.Every Thursday from 4:30 to 6 p.m., the students load up tables at UGArden with the crops they’ve grown during the semester — leafy mounds of lettuce, kale, turnip greens and bok choy, as well as radishes, turnips and teas made from herbs they’ve grown — and sell their wares to the public. Customers are able to buy field-fresh produce and the students practice educating members of the Athens community about the process of organic farming.The class, which is being taught for the second time this semester, was created after Berle, who focuses on organic horticulture, and Coolong, a vegetable specialist, were approached by a donor interested in supporting the development of an immersive course addressing both sustainability and entrepreneurship.Part of the donor funding goes to compensate Sarah Rucker, assistant farm manager for the UGArden. “(Rucker) is the one who helps coach the students and manage the farmer’s market,” Berle said. Through her role in the course, Rucker essentially serves as a teaching assistant for the course by answering any questions the students may have about their crops, best practices and marketing techniques.The UGArden herb program that is part of the class also was awarded an Experiential Learning Innovation Grant, a program of the UGA Office of the Vice President for Instruction, which provides funding to faculty who want to update or create a new course design for experiential learning.As the course progresses, Berle continually makes adjustments to give students the best opportunities to gain experience in both growing and selling organic produce.One tweak is the way students sell their produce. During the first semester the course was offered, students were selling primarily to university vendors such as UGA Dining Services and the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education & Hotel. But after realizing that students were missing out on face-to-face interaction with customers, Berle and Coolong created a weekly farmer’s market at UGArden so students could experience how to communicate and interact directly with consumers rather than just delivering to vendors.Students in the course are grateful for the opportunity to give back to the Athens community by providing fresh produce while learning what it takes to be an entrepreneur in the organic horticulture industry.“I am probably out here (in the garden) for four or five hours every day,” stated Sarah Kate Duncan, a senior horticulture major who is taking the course. “But it is totally worth it … Some of my favorite things to grow are turnip greens, different types of lettuces, fresh cut flowers and herbs.”Erica Head, works as the student assistant herb manager for UGArden. Though she is not in the entrepreneurship class, she has been connected to the UGArden herb program since taking a freshman Odyssey seminar with Berle.“I see the whole process from beginning to end: I seed the plants, I put them in the field, I dry and process them into teas. I like seeing people enjoy the teas and telling them about their medicinal effects,” Head said. “It’s also really good to see the other students selling the crops they have worked hard on all semester.”Chris Rhodes, director of industry partnerships at CAES, explains that industry leaders are looking for graduates with the creativity, communication and problem-solving skills that students in this course are gaining.“There is no substitute for running a business to learn how to run a business,” Rhodes stated. Through his role in the college, Rhodes wants to ensure that every student has the confidence to recognize a path they want to achieve and then to be connected to resources to ensure success after their time at UGA.Student-grown produce from the course will be available through the weekly farmers market until Thanksgiving. For more information on this course and other experiential learning opportunities available at CAES, visit caes.uga.edu/students/experiential-learning.last_img read more

Study reviews accuracy benefits limitations of apps used for skin cancer diagnosis

first_imgJul 5 2018In the scramble to bring successful apps for the diagnosis of skin cancer to market there is a concern that a lack of testing is risking public safety, according to research led by the University of Birmingham.The research, outlined at the British Association of Dermatologists’ Annual Meeting in Edinburgh, reviewed the medical literature on skin cancer apps to explore the number of apps on the market, ascertain how accurate they are, and what the benefits and limitations of these technological solutions are. Examples of apps include tele-dermatology (which involves sending an image directly to a dermatologist), photo storage (which can be used by individuals to compare photos monthly to look for changes in a mole), and risk calculation (based on color and pattern recognition, or on fractal analysis).The researchers found that some of these apps have a comparatively high success rate for the diagnosis of skin cancer. Teledermatology correctly identified 88 per cent of people with skin cancer and 97 per cent of those with benign lesions. Apps which use fractal theory analysis algorithms (detecting irregularities in a fractal pattern) were the next most successful category, these correctly identified 73 per cent of people with skin cancer and 83 per cent of people with benign lesions. These types of technology have huge potential, as 50 per cent of dermatology referrals in the UK relate to skin cancer. Early diagnosis results in up to 100 per cent five-year survival, compared with 25 per cent in women and 10 per cent in men diagnosed at a later stage.Technology that can help with triaging would help alleviate pressure on dermatology departments and could also increase survival rates.However, the researchers point to three major failings with some of the apps: a lack of rigorous published trials to show they work and are safe; a lack of input during the app development from specialists to identify which lesions are suspicious; and flaws in the technology used, namely how the photos are analysand.The researchers explain that, without specialist input, the apps may not recognize rarer or unusual cancers. Even where the technology is efficient, if it has not been combined with specialist input from a dermatologist, it may not pick up on all red-flag symptoms.In terms of technology, an area where color and pattern recognition software apps seem to particularly struggle currently, is in recognizing scaly, crusted, ulcerated areas or melanomas which do not produce pigment (amelanotic melanomas). This increases the number of false negatives and delays treatment.Related StoriesLiving with advanced breast cancerResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedSome apps that compare images on a monthly basis or ‘advise’ users to seek dermatologist review, based on a risk calculation, are not able to differentiate between finer details which would be identified using a dermatoscope (a magnifier that can be handheld or attached to a phone), or in person when touched by a dermatologist. If the app is based on advising patients whether to seek professional advice, then they may advise wrongly as they have not correctly identified finer details which may point to a more sinister lesion.Maria Charalambides, of the University of Birmingham’s College of Medical and Dental Sciences, who conducted the literature review, said: “Future technology will play a huge part in skin cancer diagnosis.”However, until adequate validation and regulation of apps is achieved, members of the public should be cautious when using such apps as they come with risk.”Any software that claims to provide a diagnostic element must be subject to rigorous testing and ongoing monitoring.”Apps specifically based on patient education of skin cancer can offer public health benefits in terms of how to stay safe in the sun, or the warning signs to look out for.”But as per the British Association of Dermatologists recommendations, most apps cannot currently substitute dermatologist review when it comes to actual diagnosis.”Matthew Gass of the British Association of Dermatologists, said: “These new technologies for the diagnosis of skin cancer are exciting, but the varying quality available makes it a difficult landscape for people to navigate.”These apps are not a replacement for an expert dermatologist, but they can be a useful tool in the early detection of skin cancer.”We urge people who are thinking about using these apps to research how they work and to be cautious regardless of their recommendations.”If a patch of skin such as a mole is changing in shape or size, not healing or just doesn’t seem right, go and see your GP regardless of what any app tells you.”Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the UK and rates have been climbing since the 1960s. Every year over 230,000 new cases of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) – the most common type – are diagnosed in the UK. In addition to NMSC, there are approximately 16,000 new cases of melanoma every year, resulting in around 2,285 UK deaths annually.Source: https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/news/latest/2018/07/skin-cancer-phone-apps-research.aspxlast_img read more