Cybersecurity Predictions for Tomorrow’s Internet from the the NCSA and Nasdaq Cybersecurity Summit

first_imgThis blog is the second in a three-part series written for National Cybersecurity Awareness Month. [previous post and final post]We live in a world centered around 24/7 connectivity, making cybersecurity a 24/7 concern.This is receiving special attention throughout the month of October, as the tech community recognizes National Cybersecurity Awareness Month by spotlighting cybersecurity issues and hosting public discussions about the latest tools, threats and trends affecting consumers and businesses alike.The theme of this year’s National Cybersecurity Awareness Month is “Our Shared Responsibility,” and true to theme, Dell teamed up with the National Cyber Security Alliance and Nasdaq to sponsor their cybersecurity summit in New York City.Photography by Kelsey Ayres / Nasdaq, Inc.The summit, held at Nasdaq headquarters, brought together some of the most influential leaders in the tech and cybersecurity space to discuss how today’s interconnected world is changing our society and the risks that come along with those changes. Panelists talked about how emerging technologies like artificial intelligence and machine learning will both drive new vulnerabilities and help solve them. I was happy for the opportunity to be a part of the event.I took part in the panel “Securing Breakthrough Technologies – The Next Five Years.” The panelists and I discussed how refinement of breakthrough technologies like artificial intelligence and machine learning will play an important role in the advancement of cybersecurity techniques and technologies.The main consensus was that artificial intelligence and machine learning is needed to analyze the billions of security events we receive daily, filter out the noise, identify what’s safe and not safe and provide quality information for security professionals to examine. With the volume of data that’s being produced in organizations, matched by the volume of threats, IT professionals today need this advanced technology to stay ahead.Later in the afternoon, I joined a panel with representatives from Cylance, Nutanix, and PhishMe for a more in-depth discussion on artificial intelligence. The panel, “Artificial Intelligence – Friend or Foe?” further explored how innovation and the proliferation of connected devices is providing new attack vectors and a lucrative market for cybercriminals. On the other hand, the data from these devices can provide a plethora of insight to strengthen machine learning and help humans do their jobs better and more efficiently.In the panel, I highlighted that there isn’t an area of security at Dell that isn’t using some form of artificial intelligence to help them do their jobs better. In the area of advanced threat prevention, AI today can predict the malicious intent of a piece of software, and detect anomalous behavior with more advanced security information and event management (SIEM) products to generate indications of a compromise or attack.Looking ahead, some of the big opportunities with AI lie in further advancements in generating valuable insights from security events, contextual access controls and data classification. Combining the sensitivity of the data itself with context about who is accessing it, where, how and on what device will be key to further protecting data from malicious activity and insider threats. In addition, there is an opportunity to better automate response to threats. Today, we manually address security issues as they happen. The next step is to be able to analyze an event or piece of information, decide on the response and automate that, in order to speed time to resolution and free up IT and security professionals to focus on what’s important.In the realm of cybersecurity, using AI and machine learning is in its infancy and we’ve only just scratched the surface of what’s possible. Taking advantage of advanced technology solutions and modernizing our security infrastructure will help us to protect our data and prevent threats while still allowing employees to be productive.last_img read more

HANDS reaches Saint Mary’s

first_imgFour years after it was conceived in South Bend, HANDS, a non-profit organization that provides yearlong volunteer opportunities with the goal of high social impact, continues to offer Saint Mary’s students the chance to assist Central American countries. Three Notre Dame students from Guatemala created HANDS in the summer of 2008. Maria Bosch, Stephanie Hurst and Mariana Diaz sought a way to make a difference in their country where poverty is a huge threat. The organization “creates alliances with organizations focused on sustainable development that assist economically distressed communities in Central America,” according to the HANDS website. According to the website, staff members at HANDS work year-round to “ensure a dynamic placement of volunteers that is in line with the interests of the volunteer and one that will integrate smoothly with the developing goals of the participating organization.” Meghan Lefeld, a junior at Saint Mary’s, is the HANDS volunteer recruiter for the College. “I volunteered abroad last fall break for HANDS,” Lefeld said. “I traveled with three other girls from Notre Dame and it was an experience of a lifetime.” Lefeld and the other students lived together with a host family in Antigua, Guatemala, and helped build a house for a low-income family. “I was involved in the housing and community development part when I stayed in Guatemala,” Lefeld said. “It was hard work, but so much fun at the same time.” As a volunteer recruiter, Lefeld said she informs Saint Mary’s students about the organization and encourages them to get involved with the non-profit. “HANDS gives Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame students the opportunity to help people in need in the areas of education, housing and community development,” she said. “This is a chance for students to make a real difference in developing countries.” While Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s are currently the only schools involved with HANDS, the organization hopes to reach out to other universities in the future. According to its website, “each month, the number of volunteers, projects and organizations supported by HANDS continues to rise, strengthening its effort and dedication to promoting social responsibility and action among youth around the world.” HANDS currently boasts 180 volunteers and supports 18 projects and 12 organizations, according to the organization’s website. “HANDS is available for students to volunteer over all breaks and they can apply on the website for volunteer work as well,” Lefeld said. Job and internship opportunities with HANDS can be found at www.handsorganization.org.last_img read more

Papua restricts entry as concerns mount over lack of facilities to treat COVID-19

first_imgPapuan People’s Assembly chairman Timotius Murib emphasized that restricting access to Papua was needed to prevent a surge of COVID-19 cases.“We appreciate this decision. It is the right course of action to protect indigenous Papuans from the threat of death,” he told The Jakarta Post on Monday.Timotius hoped this was a positive sign that Papua could overcome the spread of the novel coronavirus and asked for the public’s participation to fight the disease.“This does not mean that the people [in Papua] are free to move around. [They should] adhere to the government’s appeal not to gather and to stay at home,” he said.Papua has limited daily community activities to eight hours, from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meanwhile, large gatherings, including religious worship, were restricted starting on Wednesday.Separately, Papua COVID-19 response team spokesperson Silwanus Sumule conceded that the handling of COVID-19 in Papua was a cause for concern because the province lacked the necessary medical equipment, including rapid testing kits to examine swab samples from suspected patients.Read also: Greater Jakarta failing as floodgate to nationwide COVID-19 epidemic“We need seven to 10 hours to examine a sample. Indeed, we have received information that the Health Ministry will send us as many as 2,400 rapid testing kits. This is what we are expecting,” Sumule said.He added that Papua had only 45 hospitals, 15 of which were referral hospitals for coronavirus cases. Combined, they have 202 isolation rooms and can accommodate up to 4,500 patients.“If [COVID-19] affected 20 percent of Papua’s populations, that means 800,000 people would be infected. Of those, perhaps 160,000 would need to be treated in hospitals and 8,000 treated in isolation rooms,” he said.In such a scenario, Papua would struggle to treat its own residents, let alone visitors from outside the province, he added.Papua has recorded three confirmed COVID-19 cases as of Tuesday, with at least 19 people under surveillance and 716 people under monitoring.“Five among the 716 people are foreigners. Meanwhile, the 19 people under surveillance comprise six in Merauke, two in Biak, one in Mimika, nine in Jayapura city and one in Jayapura regency.” (syk) Papua is set to restrict entry into the province both through sea and air travel in an effort to stem the spread of COVID-19 in Indonesia’s easternmost region.Papua Governor Lukas Enembe, together with members of the Regional Leadership Communication Forum, announced the measure shortly after the province’s first two COVID-19 positive cases were revealed on Sunday.”This is not a lockdown; only a restriction. However, we are considering whether it is necessary to completely block [access to] Papua to protect Lapago, Meepago and Animha because they are particularly vulnerable,” Lukas said during a meeting in Jayapura on Monday. The three areas are Papua’s indigenous territories. Lapago and Meepago have nine regencies and five regencies, respectively, both located in the Central Highlands of Papua, while Animha, located in South Papua, has four regencies. The travel restrictions exclude the transportation of goods into the province, Lukas said, asserting that the distribution of various supplies would continue as usual.“The policy takes effect on Thursday and will be in place for the next 14 days,” he said, adding that the provincial administration would evaluate the policy at the end of the two-week period.Read also: Explainer: Will Indonesia be Southeast Asia’s Italy? A review of how the nation is battling COVID-19center_img Topics :last_img read more