The Taste of La Salle Draws Hundreds

first_imgPhoto Gallery The Taste of La Salle Draws Hundreds STAFF REPORTS | Photography by ROBIN SMITH Published on Monday, March 31, 2014 | 2:52 pm Herbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCouples Who Stuck With Each Other Despite The Cheating ScandalHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyBohemian Summer: How To Wear The Boho Trend RightHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Secrets That Eastern Women Swear By To Stay Young LongerHerbeautyHerbeauty Make a comment Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Subscribe 2 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Business News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community Newscenter_img Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * More Cool Stuff EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Top of the News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena First Heatwave Expected Next Week The Alumni Association of La Salle High School hosted the return of the much anticipated Taste of La Salle on March 22nd on campus. Nearly 350 guests tempted their taste buds with delicious food and drink from the 36 participating restaurants and beverage vendors.The Opportunity Drawing drew a lot of interest with 7 delicious prizes up for grabs. Phil Velasco ’07 won the Private Cooking Class and Dinner for 2, Bob Nuccio ’71 won the “Stock Your Bar” package featuring 10 cases of Anheuser-Busch beer and 14 bottles of wine and spirits, and Mike Sullivan ’70 won the highly coveted “Eat Out For a Year” basket which included more than $2,500 worth of gift cards to local eateries. The event netted over $19,000 for the Alumni Association College Scholarship Fund which all current students are invited to apply for their junior year.The next Taste of La Salle will be held in 2016…and is sure to be even tastier!La Salle High School, 3880 East Sierra Madre Blvd., Pasadena, (626) 351-8951 or visit www.lasallehs.org. Community News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m.last_img read more

Lessons from retirement industry litigation

first_imgIf your organization offers a retirement plan to your employees, you assume fiduciary responsibility and that opens you up to a number of risks, including legal action. When you’ve worked in the retirement plan business as long as I have, you can’t escape the occasional breaking news story of a well-meaning company facing litigation involving their company retirement plan. The catalyst for action is usually a disgruntled former employee going to an attorney. The attorney most often looks for mutual funds with higher-than-average expenses based on the holdings information that is publically disclosed (IRS Form 5500). The attorney then multiplies that amount by six years (statute of limitation under ERISA). At that point, the attorney determines if it is financially worthwhile to file for legal action. To further complicate the matter, under the rules for a class action suit in the 401(k) world, just one person satisfies the rules for a class action suit because the class is easy to define (all current and former employees).Documentation and NeglectIn discovery, the attorney looks for neglect (not replacing funds that are overpriced, underperforming, or have manager turnover) and lack of documentation (written recommendations from the advisor and/or committee minutes), to prove shortcomings in the basis for how decisions are made.Fortunately, the standard of fiduciary law under ERISA isn’t that your recommendations be 100% correct, but rather that you follow prudent standards (structure, discipline, and documentation) to prove that you have a process in place. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

How Kobe Bryant helped connect Asian Americans with both Asia and America

first_imgKobe Bryant storiesKobe Bryant was proud advocate for women’s basketballPurple and gold lights from LA to NY and beyond signal superstar’s lossKobe Bryant lives on in inspired murals dotting Southern CaliforniaThe best of Kobe Bryant’s legends and tall tales with the LakersHere are the 8 people who died in the helicopter crash with Kobe Bryant AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersSouthern California’s Asian American and Pacific Islander community grew significantly in the 2000s, just as Bryant reached his peak with the Lakers. For many in the community trying to find their place in the ever-sprawling region, Bryant was their gateway to Southern California and its culture, to a classroom with few immigrant peers, to a family divided by generations or continents.And with the news of his death and eight others on Sunday, Jan. 26, in a helicopter crash in the Calabasas hills, several said they still find themselves mourning days later.“Kobe was our guy,” Josh Chung, 26, of Los Angeles, said. “Now, it’s all gone.”Complete coverage: Kobe Bryant helicopter crashIn 2000, Kim was dropped into foreign surroundings when his family moved from South Korea. He hadn’t watched many Laker games in Korea, but in Burbank he found new friends as he fell in love with the team just “when Kobe and Shaq were going nuts.” Southern California is “self-segregated,” he said, “there’s nothing that really holds it together other than sports.”And, you didn’t have to be a kid to find a lifeline in Bryant. Tung said her grandmother emigrated from Taiwan to the United States in the mid-1990s. Ready to move beyond the safety of a familiar mahjong club, her grandmother gravitated toward watching Laker games, Tung said.“She would relate to the small guys because my grandmother used to be a small guard too,” Tung said. “And she really, really appreciated that Kobe makes most of his free throws.”Her grandmother doesn’t know English well – she calls players by their numbers – but she and Tung can connect watching and talking about the Lakers.“It’s really been a connecting tissue,” she said.Shanahan came to the United States from the Philippines when she was 4 and has lived in Long Beach ever since. She remembers when Bryant visited the island country in 1998, dancing with the locals and checking out basketball courts.“It really helped the Filipino community feel close to him,” Shanahan said. “We don’t have a lot of prevalent icons, so he kind of felt like that for many of us.”Chung said he also saw a dedication in Bryant that resonated with him and a lot of his friends.“We grew up with people telling us, whether parents or coaches, you have to work hard,” he said, “and that’s that immigrant narrative that a lot of us saw in Kobe.” With limited English, 10-year-old James Kim broke the ice at lunch with his new classmates talking about Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O’Neal, and how they took the Los Angeles Lakers to the championships in 2001.Now living in Long Beach, cheering for Bryant was how Anne Milo Shanahan’s family still connected with cousins back home in the Philippines.PreviousThe ferris wheel at the Santa Monica Pier is lit in purple and gold in honor of LA Lakers legend Kobe Bryant on Tuesday, January 28, 2020.(Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer)Laker fans gather in front of a mural of Kobe Bryant on the 1300 block of Lebanon Street across from the LA Convention center in Los Angeles Monday, January 27, 2020. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)LOS ANGELES, CA – JANUARY 28: Fans leave condolence message on boards to pay their respects to Kobe Bryant and his daughter Gianna, 13, at a memorial set up outside of Staples Center on January 28, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. Kobe his daughter Gianna, were among nine people killed in a helicopter crash on January 26 in Calabasas, California. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JANUARY 28: Fans gather to pay their respects to Kobe Bryant at LA Live on January 28, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – JANUARY 28: Items left by fans to pay their respects to Kobe Bryant at LA Live on January 28, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JANUARY 28: Fans shoot baskets at a memorial wall near Staples Center in honor of former NBA great Kobe Bryant who, along with his 13-year-old daughter Gianna, died January 26 in a helicopter crash, on January 28, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. Kobe and “Gigi” were among nine people killed in the crash in Calabasas, California as they were flying to his Mamba Sports Academy in Thousand Oaks, where he was going to coach her in a tournament game. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)People mourn Kobe Bryant outside of the Staples Center in Los Angeles, Tuesday, January 28, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The ferris wheel at the Santa Monica Pier is lit in purple and gold in honor of LA Lakers legend Kobe Bryant on Tuesday, January 28, 2020.(Photo by Axel Koester, Contributing Photographer)Laker fans gather in front of a mural of Kobe Bryant on the 1300 block of Lebanon Street across from the LA Convention center in Los Angeles Monday, January 27, 2020. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 7Laker fans gather in front of a mural of Kobe Bryant on the 1300 block of Lebanon Street across from the LA Convention center in Los Angeles Monday, January 27, 2020. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)ExpandAnd, watching the basketball legend run the court on television with her 90-year-old grandmother are special memories for Yvette Tung.“That’s what you talked to people about,” Tung, 38, of Hacienda Heights, said. “All of a sudden, you have integrated. You’re in LA now.”center_img “It was always the topic of conversation you can bring up to people,” Kim said. “Our core friend group was white kids, Mexican kids, half-Asian kids, but we were religiously following Kobe. That was really what tied us together.”“Ask a Korean” blogger who writes under the pen name T.K. Park moved to Cerritos from Korea as a 10th grader in 1996, just as rookie Bryant was emerging with the Lakers.“Just starting conversation was so much easier. You had to just talk about the Lakers,” said Park, who now lives on the East Coast. “It’s like magic, where you have to say a certain word and you gain admission into the society.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

New KSHSAA classification proposal will change everything for Sumner County schools

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — Sumner County athletic officials are currently sitting tight and studying a new classification proposal by the Kansas State High School Activities Association that will dramatically alter the sports landscape across the state.Last week, a 14-person committee released a new proposal at the monthly KSHSAA meeting that would restructure the football classifications. It would divide the classification into 32 teams for 6A, 5A and 4A; 48 teams for 3A and 2A and the remaining schools into 1A 11-man schools. In Kansas, 11-man football in Class 1A hasn’t been played since 1984.In the all sports other than football classification, teams would be divided into 36 teams for 6A, 5A and 4A; 64 schools will be in 3A and 2A, and 117 in Class 1A. The divisions of Class 4A and 1A would be eliminated.The classifications would not go into effect until the 2018-19 school year. The new classification proposal won’t be voted on until April.For all the talk, it won’t affect us directly, said Luke Smith, Wellington School Activities Director. We are right in the middle of Class 4A Division 1 right now. So we would still be in Class 4A with the new proposals.While the football landscape will not change for Wellington since the state isn’t altering Class 6A to 4A, the new all other sports could dramatically affect who the Crusaders will play in the post season.Wellington’s basketball, baseball, tennis and other teams may no longer have to contend with McPherson, Bishop Miege, Winfield, and other big 4A schools. The top eight schools in Class 4A would be playing in 5A in all other sports.” (See classification list from last year here.)That would be great for us, said Brian Aufdengarten, Wellington head girls tennis coach. This new proposal would get us away from schools like Bishop Miege, McPherson on one end, and Collegiate on the other.As for Conway Springs and Belle Plaine it could be a different story – especially in football. The new system would have 48 teams in the new 4A which would include all 32 Class 4A Div. II schools and the top 16 in the current Class 3A. Using last year’s enrollment numbers, Conway Springs and Belle Plaine are not in the top 16, and would fall into the new Class 2A. Schools like Wichita Collegiate, Beloit and Scott City would remain in 3A. Silver Lake would be one of those schools that would waver between the new 3A or 2A.We have not had a chance to look at the specifics to the proposal, said Matt Biehler, Conway Springs head football coach. If it is an option we heard that takes less teams to the playoffs than we did prior to 2002 then we would not support it. However, if they make it a way that gets the best teams to the late round playoffs it would be a good deal.The all other classification proposed list, may not be kind to either Conway Springs and Belle Plaine. Both schools would be teetering between the new 3A and the new 2A. The new 64 Class 3A classification would get 20 new Class 4A Div. II schools and 44 of the top 64 Class 3A teams. If that count was taken this year, Conway Springs would be in 3A while Belle Plaine would drop to 2A.That leaves the other Sumner County schools: Oxford, Argonia, Caldwell and South Haven. The new classification wouldn’t affect these schools at all except that it would eliminate the Divisions of Class 1A in basketball. Oxford may be an exception and go to 2A on the all other sports list, but it would have to incur some growth and leapfrog several schools to get to 2A.Follow us on Facebook.Follow us on Twitter.p class=”p1″>Follow us on Facebook.Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more