Two years after Charlie, cartoonists are still persecuted

first_img “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says June 4, 2021 Find out more January 6, 2017 Two years after Charlie, cartoonists are still persecuted Joel PettCartoonists Rights Network International © Joep Bertrams (Pays-Bas) – Cartooning for Peace JABEUR MEJRI (Tunisia)A 29-year-old Tunisian blogger, Jabeur Mejri was prosecuted in March 2012 for posting cartoons and satirical texts on social networks at a time of continuing tension just over a year after President Ben Ali’s removal, when anything to do with religion was extremely sensitive. The cartoons, in particular, were deemed to have insulted Islam. He was sentenced to seven and a half years in prison and a fine of 1,200 dinars on charges of disrupting public order, causing wrong to others, and violating morality. He was strongly defended by human rights groups, which regarded him as one of the first prisoners of conscience since the fall of the Ben Ali regime. After two years in prison, he was finally pardoned by President Moncef Marzouki and was released in March 2014. He was arrested again the following month on a charge of insulting an official. After a second pardon in October 2014, he left Tunisia.© Willis from Tunis (Tunisia) – Cartooning for Peace RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan How you wield a pencil can still lead to violent reprisals.Only too often, cartoonists pay a high price for their irony and impertinence. The threats they receive are barometers of free speech, acting as indicators of the state of democracy in times of trouble.It is hard to say whether cartoonists are more exposed since the attack that killed 12 people at Charlie Hebdo in Paris on 7 January 2015. But they continue to be subjected to political, religious and economic pressure, to censorship, dismissal, death threats, judicial harassment, violence and, in the worst cases, even murder. As a profession, they are clearly threatened.“Since the Charlie tragedy, many cartoonists have lived under constant political, religious and economic pressure, and pressure from non-state groups as well,” RSF secretary-general Christophe Deloire said.“Accusations of offending religion are too often used as a tool of political censorship. It is essential to remember that international law protects cartoonists because it safeguards the right to express and disseminate opinions that may offend, shock or disturb.”Cartooning for Peace president Plantu (Jean Plantureux) said: “Many cartoonists bear witness, in their battles and in the harassment and threats they receive, to the importance they assign to their efforts to raise awareness. Since the Charlie terrorist attacks, other tragic events have confirmed that, more than ever, we need to pursue our fight for freedom, one that is also waged with the pencil.”RSF, Cartooning for Peace and the other press cartoonist associations have compiled the following profiles of cartoonists who have been dismissed, arrested, imprisoned or threatened because of their cartoons.The chosen cartoonists are Zunar, who has been hounded by the Malaysian authorities for years and is be tried at the end of January; Tahar Djehiche, an Algerian cartoonist who was given a jail sentence for insulting President Bouteflika; Musa Kart, the Turkish newspaper Cumhuriyet’s well-known cartoonist, who is now in jail; and Rayma Suprani, who was fired from the Venezuelan newspaper El Universal over her cartoons about the government and now lives in exile in the United States.Sometimes just reposting a cartoon can lead to prosecution and imprisonment. This is what happened to Tunisian blogger Jabeur Mejri, who was sentenced to seven and a half years in prison in 2012 in connection with his Facebook posts.ZUNAR (Malaysia)Zulkifli Anwar Ulhaque, the cartoonist better known as Zunar, is a symbol of the fight for freedom of expression in Malaysia and the government’s bugbear. Because of his cartoons denouncing the corruption in all layers of Malaysian society, he has been subjected to various kinds of persecution for nearly a decade including repeated detention, arrests of assistants and supporters, a travel ban, the closure of his website, the confiscation of his cartoons and a ban on his cartoon books. When the opening of a Zunar exhibition was disrupted by his critics in November, the police intervened, confiscated the cartoons and ended up taking him into custody. In December, he was arrested again when he organized a sale of his books to compensate for the financial loss resulting from the exhibition’s cancellation. As a result, he is now being investigated as a threat to parliamentary democracy. He is already facing up to 43 years in prison on nine counts of violating the Sedition Act, which violates freedom of expression by making it easy to prosecute journalists and cartoonists for supposedly “seditious” content. The pretext for Zunar’s prosecution was nine tweets critical of the government. His trial has been postponed twice in the past two years and is now due to start on 24 January. Last year he received the Cartooning for Peace Prize for his courage and determination.© Zunar (Malaysia) – Cartooning for Peace FranceTunisiaTurkeyAlgeriaVenezuelaMalaysiaEurope – Central AsiaMiddle East – North Africa AmericasAsia – Pacific Condemning abusesReligious intoleranceProtecting journalists Judicial harassmentEconomic pressureImpunityViolenceImprisonedFreedom of expression Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says Receive email alerts News June 7, 2021 Find out more News to go further RSF_en FranceTunisiaTurkeyAlgeriaVenezuelaMalaysiaEurope – Central AsiaMiddle East – North Africa AmericasAsia – Pacific Condemning abusesReligious intoleranceProtecting journalists Judicial harassmentEconomic pressureImpunityViolenceImprisonedFreedom of expression Organisation News Tjeerd RoyaardsCartoon Movement TAHAR DJEHICHE (Algeria)The Algerian cartoonist Tahar Djehiche posted a cartoon on social networks in April 2015 showing President Abdelaziz Bouteflika being buried under the sand of In Salah, a Saharan region where the population has been protesting against the use of fracking to produce shale gas. His aim was to draw attention to the environmental dangers of shale gas production by this means in Algeria, but he was charged with insulting the president and “inciting a mob.” He was acquitted in May 2015, but was convicted on appeal the following November and was sentenced to six months in prison and a fine of 500,000 dinars. Many international organizations have condemned this absurd and incomprehensible decision, especially as it is still not known who was responsible for the appeal.© Tahar Djehiche (Algeria) – Cartooning for Peace June 8, 2021 Find out more Christophe DeloireReporters Without BordersPlantuCartooning for PeaceAnn Telnaes The Association of American Editorial Cartoonists RAYMA (Venezuela)Rayma Suprani is a Venezuela cartoonist who worked for nearly 20 years for the Caracas-based daily El Universal. Her cartoons criticized poverty, the lack of social justice and abuse of power under President Hugo Chavez, and under his successors after Chavez died in office in 2013. She had often been subjected to threats and pressure but in September 2014 she went “too far” in one of her cartoons. It portrayed public healthcare in Venezuela – which has been undermined by the crisis in the petrodollar economy – as an electrocardiogram that began with Chavez’s well-known signature and then flatlined. She was immediately fired by El Universal, which had just been acquired by someone more sympathetic to the Chavista government. Deprived of her source of income, she fled to the United States, where she continues to use her pencil to fight for freedom of expression.© Rayma (Venezuela) – Cartooning for Peace MUSA KART (Turkey)During the wave of arrests that followed last July’s failed coup in Turkey, the police detained a dozen employees of the leading opposition newspaper Cumhuriyet on 31 October. They included editor Murat Sabuncu, the newspaper’s lawyer, and its well-known cartoonist, Musa Kart. The head of the Istanbul prosecutor’s office said they were suspected of committing crimes on behalf of the Gülen movement (which is accused by the government of orchestrating the coup attempt). “For years I have tried to transcribe what we live through in this country in the form of caricatures and today it seems that I have entered one of them,” Kart said at the time. “What explanations will they give to the rest of the world? I have been taken into police custody because I drew cartoons!”© Musa Kart (Turkey) – Cartooning for Peace News Help by sharing this information On the eve of the second anniversary of the Charlie Hebdo massacre, Reporters Without Borders (RSF), Cartooning for Peace and other cartoonist associations pay tribute to all press cartoonists who defend media freedom by means of their cartoons. Follow the news on Europe – Central Asialast_img read more

Report: Asian wind power capacity to top 141 GW by 2027

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Clean Technica:Annual wind capacity additions in the Asia Pacific region (excluding China) are expected to reach 12.1 gigawatts (GW) by 2022 according to new research from MAKE Consulting, more than double the capacity added by the end of 2017 of 5.5 GW.The new report, Asia Pacific (excl. China) Wind Power Outlook 2018, was published this week by MAKE Consulting (recently a Wood Mackenzie company), and predicted that not only would annual wind capacity additions in the region reach a peak of 12.1 GW, but that over 96 GW would be added over the next 10 years thanks to market dynamics at play in India, Australia, and Taiwan. As a result, cumulative wind capacity in the region is likely to hit 141 GW in 10 years.MAKE focused primarily on those three countries. Specifically, in India, MAKE Senior Analyst Robert Liew believes that wind development will achieve record years of new added capacity but that growth prospects could be limited by grid limitations, an issue which continues to plague the Indian energy sector no matter the technology type. As the country transitions to an auction system — as compared to the previously-traditional government financial support mechanism — the growth of the wind energy industry in India is reliant upon large-scale auctions which have allowed wind prices to drop by over half in just under a year. Unsurprisingly, therefore, the Indian central government is now targeting upwards of 10 GW of new auctions every financial year.Conversely, according to Liew, “Political uncertainty over replacement of the national renewable energy target in Australia hinders growth potential.” As has been highlighted recently, the Australian renewable energy sector receives little-to-no support from the Federal Government due to the mammoth entrenched interests in the country’s coal industry present in the current ruling party, headed by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull. This has been taken to new heights with political infighting over the proposed National Energy Guarantee (NEG) which doesn’t even warrant the title of “middle ground option” between the two ideological points of view regarding renewable energy. As such, renewable energy growth is driven at the State- and commercial-level, as well as market economics that stem from the competitiveness of onshore wind’s Levelized Cost of Energy (LCoE).Meanwhile, as has also been repeatedly highlighted of late, the Taiwan wind sector is being driven almost single-handedly by its offshore wind energy potential and its recent auctions which recently awarded over 5 GW to numerous bidders. What will be most important to watch is the role that Taiwan begins to play as a regional hub for the development of offshore wind, as well as the country’s own future ambitions.More: Asia Pacific Annual Wind Capacity To Climb Over 12 Gigawatts By 2022 Report: Asian wind power capacity to top 141 GW by 2027last_img read more