US army and Iraqi police both urged to investigate deaths of two Reuters employees

first_imgNews Three jailed reporters charged with “undermining national security” July 13, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 US army and Iraqi police both urged to investigate deaths of two Reuters employees News IraqMiddle East – North Africa Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information RSF_en Organisation to go further Reporters Without Borders today called on both the US army and the Iraqi police to investigate the deaths of a photographer and a driver employed by Reuters in Baghdad because of the contradictory accounts about the circumstances. If the responsibilities are not clearly established, suspicions will persist about the US army’s involvement. News IraqMiddle East – North Africa December 28, 2020 Find out more December 16, 2020 Find out more News RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” Reporters Without Borders today called on both the US army and the Iraqi police to investigate the deaths of a photographer and a driver employed by Reuters yesterday in Baghdad because of the contradictory accounts about the circumstances. Their deaths bring to six the number of Reuters employees killed since the start of the US-led invasion in March 2003.“We are deeply saddened by the deaths of these two Reuters employees and we offer our most sincere condolences to their families and colleagues,” the press freedom organisation said. “An investigation must be quickly carried out by both the US army and the Iraqi police, who have a police post at Al-Rashad that is near where they were killed. If the circumstances and responsibilities are not clearly established, suspicions will persist about the US army’s involvement.”Photographer Namir Noor-Eldeen, 22, and his driver, Saeed Chmagh, 40, were killed in east Baghdad by gunfire of unclear origin. Witnesses said a rocket was fired from a US helicopter. But other sources told Reuters they could have been killed by a mortar shell fired by Iraqi militia members.Reuters chief executive Tom Glocer said: “Noor-Eldeen and Chmagh’s outstanding contribution to reporting on the unfolding events in Iraq has been vital. They stand alongside other colleagues in Reuters who have died doing a job that they believe in.”Reporters Without Borders has also learned that Khaled W. Hassan, 23, an Iraqi journalist employed by the New York Times, was gunned down as he was going to work today in the south Baghdad district of Saidiyah. He had worked for the New York Times for four years and was its second employee to be killed in Iraq. The press freedom organisation urges the Iraqi authorities to establish the exact circumstances of his death.Covering the war in Iraq is now the most dangerous job in the world for journalists. A total of 194 have been killed in Iraq since the start of the war. Reporters Without Borders is also without any word as to the fate of 14 Iraqi journalists who have been kidnapped, some of them more than a year ago. Iraq : Wave of arrests of journalists covering protests in Iraqi Kurdistan February 15, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Iraqlast_img read more

Two years after Charlie, cartoonists are still persecuted

first_img “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says June 4, 2021 Find out more January 6, 2017 Two years after Charlie, cartoonists are still persecuted Joel PettCartoonists Rights Network International © Joep Bertrams (Pays-Bas) – Cartooning for Peace JABEUR MEJRI (Tunisia)A 29-year-old Tunisian blogger, Jabeur Mejri was prosecuted in March 2012 for posting cartoons and satirical texts on social networks at a time of continuing tension just over a year after President Ben Ali’s removal, when anything to do with religion was extremely sensitive. The cartoons, in particular, were deemed to have insulted Islam. He was sentenced to seven and a half years in prison and a fine of 1,200 dinars on charges of disrupting public order, causing wrong to others, and violating morality. He was strongly defended by human rights groups, which regarded him as one of the first prisoners of conscience since the fall of the Ben Ali regime. After two years in prison, he was finally pardoned by President Moncef Marzouki and was released in March 2014. He was arrested again the following month on a charge of insulting an official. After a second pardon in October 2014, he left Tunisia.© Willis from Tunis (Tunisia) – Cartooning for Peace RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan How you wield a pencil can still lead to violent reprisals.Only too often, cartoonists pay a high price for their irony and impertinence. The threats they receive are barometers of free speech, acting as indicators of the state of democracy in times of trouble.It is hard to say whether cartoonists are more exposed since the attack that killed 12 people at Charlie Hebdo in Paris on 7 January 2015. But they continue to be subjected to political, religious and economic pressure, to censorship, dismissal, death threats, judicial harassment, violence and, in the worst cases, even murder. As a profession, they are clearly threatened.“Since the Charlie tragedy, many cartoonists have lived under constant political, religious and economic pressure, and pressure from non-state groups as well,” RSF secretary-general Christophe Deloire said.“Accusations of offending religion are too often used as a tool of political censorship. It is essential to remember that international law protects cartoonists because it safeguards the right to express and disseminate opinions that may offend, shock or disturb.”Cartooning for Peace president Plantu (Jean Plantureux) said: “Many cartoonists bear witness, in their battles and in the harassment and threats they receive, to the importance they assign to their efforts to raise awareness. Since the Charlie terrorist attacks, other tragic events have confirmed that, more than ever, we need to pursue our fight for freedom, one that is also waged with the pencil.”RSF, Cartooning for Peace and the other press cartoonist associations have compiled the following profiles of cartoonists who have been dismissed, arrested, imprisoned or threatened because of their cartoons.The chosen cartoonists are Zunar, who has been hounded by the Malaysian authorities for years and is be tried at the end of January; Tahar Djehiche, an Algerian cartoonist who was given a jail sentence for insulting President Bouteflika; Musa Kart, the Turkish newspaper Cumhuriyet’s well-known cartoonist, who is now in jail; and Rayma Suprani, who was fired from the Venezuelan newspaper El Universal over her cartoons about the government and now lives in exile in the United States.Sometimes just reposting a cartoon can lead to prosecution and imprisonment. This is what happened to Tunisian blogger Jabeur Mejri, who was sentenced to seven and a half years in prison in 2012 in connection with his Facebook posts.ZUNAR (Malaysia)Zulkifli Anwar Ulhaque, the cartoonist better known as Zunar, is a symbol of the fight for freedom of expression in Malaysia and the government’s bugbear. Because of his cartoons denouncing the corruption in all layers of Malaysian society, he has been subjected to various kinds of persecution for nearly a decade including repeated detention, arrests of assistants and supporters, a travel ban, the closure of his website, the confiscation of his cartoons and a ban on his cartoon books. When the opening of a Zunar exhibition was disrupted by his critics in November, the police intervened, confiscated the cartoons and ended up taking him into custody. In December, he was arrested again when he organized a sale of his books to compensate for the financial loss resulting from the exhibition’s cancellation. As a result, he is now being investigated as a threat to parliamentary democracy. He is already facing up to 43 years in prison on nine counts of violating the Sedition Act, which violates freedom of expression by making it easy to prosecute journalists and cartoonists for supposedly “seditious” content. The pretext for Zunar’s prosecution was nine tweets critical of the government. His trial has been postponed twice in the past two years and is now due to start on 24 January. Last year he received the Cartooning for Peace Prize for his courage and determination.© Zunar (Malaysia) – Cartooning for Peace FranceTunisiaTurkeyAlgeriaVenezuelaMalaysiaEurope – Central AsiaMiddle East – North Africa AmericasAsia – Pacific Condemning abusesReligious intoleranceProtecting journalists Judicial harassmentEconomic pressureImpunityViolenceImprisonedFreedom of expression Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says Receive email alerts News June 7, 2021 Find out more News to go further RSF_en FranceTunisiaTurkeyAlgeriaVenezuelaMalaysiaEurope – Central AsiaMiddle East – North Africa AmericasAsia – Pacific Condemning abusesReligious intoleranceProtecting journalists Judicial harassmentEconomic pressureImpunityViolenceImprisonedFreedom of expression Organisation News Tjeerd RoyaardsCartoon Movement TAHAR DJEHICHE (Algeria)The Algerian cartoonist Tahar Djehiche posted a cartoon on social networks in April 2015 showing President Abdelaziz Bouteflika being buried under the sand of In Salah, a Saharan region where the population has been protesting against the use of fracking to produce shale gas. His aim was to draw attention to the environmental dangers of shale gas production by this means in Algeria, but he was charged with insulting the president and “inciting a mob.” He was acquitted in May 2015, but was convicted on appeal the following November and was sentenced to six months in prison and a fine of 500,000 dinars. Many international organizations have condemned this absurd and incomprehensible decision, especially as it is still not known who was responsible for the appeal.© Tahar Djehiche (Algeria) – Cartooning for Peace June 8, 2021 Find out more Christophe DeloireReporters Without BordersPlantuCartooning for PeaceAnn Telnaes The Association of American Editorial Cartoonists RAYMA (Venezuela)Rayma Suprani is a Venezuela cartoonist who worked for nearly 20 years for the Caracas-based daily El Universal. Her cartoons criticized poverty, the lack of social justice and abuse of power under President Hugo Chavez, and under his successors after Chavez died in office in 2013. She had often been subjected to threats and pressure but in September 2014 she went “too far” in one of her cartoons. It portrayed public healthcare in Venezuela – which has been undermined by the crisis in the petrodollar economy – as an electrocardiogram that began with Chavez’s well-known signature and then flatlined. She was immediately fired by El Universal, which had just been acquired by someone more sympathetic to the Chavista government. Deprived of her source of income, she fled to the United States, where she continues to use her pencil to fight for freedom of expression.© Rayma (Venezuela) – Cartooning for Peace MUSA KART (Turkey)During the wave of arrests that followed last July’s failed coup in Turkey, the police detained a dozen employees of the leading opposition newspaper Cumhuriyet on 31 October. They included editor Murat Sabuncu, the newspaper’s lawyer, and its well-known cartoonist, Musa Kart. The head of the Istanbul prosecutor’s office said they were suspected of committing crimes on behalf of the Gülen movement (which is accused by the government of orchestrating the coup attempt). “For years I have tried to transcribe what we live through in this country in the form of caricatures and today it seems that I have entered one of them,” Kart said at the time. “What explanations will they give to the rest of the world? I have been taken into police custody because I drew cartoons!”© Musa Kart (Turkey) – Cartooning for Peace News Help by sharing this information On the eve of the second anniversary of the Charlie Hebdo massacre, Reporters Without Borders (RSF), Cartooning for Peace and other cartoonist associations pay tribute to all press cartoonists who defend media freedom by means of their cartoons. Follow the news on Europe – Central Asialast_img read more

Obama Talks Haiti, Honduras with Dominican President

first_imgBy Dialogo July 14, 2010 US President Barack Obama thanked the Dominican Republic Monday for help in battling crises in Haiti, Honduras and on drugs trafficking as he hosted President Leonel Fernandez at the White House. Fernandez meanwhile praised Obama for keeping Latin American issues on his agenda, as he copes with economic and diplomatic crises on multiple fronts. “One of the first messages I wanted to deliver was our appreciation for the role the Dominican Republic played in helping the international community respond to the crisis in Haiti after the devastating earthquake,” Obama said. “The Dominican Republic’s role, President Fernandez’s role in particular, was extraordinarily important. It saved lives, it continues, as we look at how we can reconstruct and can rebuild.” Obama spoke in the Oval Office as Haiti marked six months since hundreds of thousands of people were killed in the massive earthquake, with multitudes of people still homeless and international aid only slowly trickling in. The US leader also praised the Dominican Republic for its role in feverish regional diplomacy following the ouster of former president Manuel Zelaya in a coup just over a year ago. Zelaya, now in exile in the Dominican Republic, accused the United States of having backed his ouster — a claim the State Department has denied. As always, when he meets leaders from Latin America, Obama stressed the need for a joint, region-wide effort to crack down on drug trafficking and related violence.last_img read more

Best injury doubts persist.

first_imgIt’s being reported by a Northern Ireland paper that Rory Best will not be fit for Saturdays clash with South Africa at the Aviva.According to the Belfast Newsletter Best will not recover in time from his calf injury.If Best isn’t fit it means Sean Cronin will most likely start. Meanwhile the Irish Independent reports that Robbie Henshaw and Jared Payne will be paired together in the centre.It had been thought either Henshaw or Payne would start beside Gordon D’Arcy.last_img

Dunder and Wunderino named as latest AffiliateFEST sponsors

first_img VBET agrees Armenian Premier League and Armenian Cup sponsorship August 13, 2020 Popular online casino brands Dunder and Wunderino have become the latest operators to sponsor the fourth annual AffiliateFEST, which takes place in London on Wednesday 19th September at the Hilton Hotel, Olympia. They join previously announced sponsors Novibet, Videoslots, Intertops, Buffalo Partners, Income Access, VBet, Wag.io and YourFreeBet.com in supporting the event which offers accelerated digital learnings for igaming affiliate entrepreneurs. Adam Webber, Head of Acquisition at Dunder Casino, said: “Dunder is always keen to meet and engage with its affiliate partners as they are such an important part of our story and continued success. “AffiliateFEST looks like a great event to get involved with and provides us with an opportunity to catch up with existing partners and meet some new ones also.” Sam Kyller, Head of Acquisition at Wunderino, said: “We have heard a lot of good things about AffiliateFEST and our expectations are set very high. This premium event is a rare opportunity to meet and engage with new partners as well as catching up with existing ones.” AffiliateFEST provides a unique opportunity for affiliates and operators to meet in a highly educational environment for both parties. The event’s bespoke agenda has been tailored to deliver real insight, genuine value and plenty of actionable tips and tricks. The fourth running of the event will see attendees hear from the brightest minds and creative talents in the digital space, including keynote speaker Ben Jeffries from influencer.com and a range of experts from the likes of SearchBrothers, Harris Hagan and Digital Fuel. The focus this year is on helping affiliates better understand the code of advertising and where the opportunities for growth and revenue development lie. This includes the role artificial intelligence and blockchain will play in the affiliate sector moving forwards. The event also offers a plethora of networking opportunities throughout the day where delegates can talk with digital and igaming experts in a fun and relaxed environment. Lee-Ann Johnstone, founder of Affiliate Insider, which runs AffiliateFEST, said: “We are thrilled to announce the support of two more big-name brands in the form of Dunder Casino and Wunderino. “Their sponsorship is evidence of how AffiliateFEST has grown since it launched and the positive value it delivers to affiliates and operators alike. I would like to thank both operators for their support and believe they will be a big part of the event’s success.” Affiliates wishing to attend AffiliateFEST can register here, while operators or suppliers interested in sponsorship can enquire here. Vbet sponsors AS Monaco as Ligue 1 kicks off new season August 24, 2020 Share StumbleUpon Share Submit Affiliate concerns: Maintaining trust in the modern market July 9, 2020 Related Articleslast_img read more

Aston Villa v Chelsea player ratings

first_imgSee also:Two off as Chelsea suffer defeat at VillaAngry Mourinho accuses Villa forwardMourinho keen to avoid referee FoyFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

Raiders’ home in 2019: Don’t rule out Oakland, plus other possibilities

first_imgThe odds that the Raiders will be playing their final game at the … ALAMEDA — So Oakland has thrown down the gauntlet, and is forcing the Raiders to leave town sooner rather than later.The Raiders have responded by rescinding their offer of $7.5 million to play in the Coliseum in 2020.No doubt the Raiders are exploring their options. Owner Mark Davis used the line several times when talking with reporters at the NFL owner’s meetings in Dallas: “All options are on the table.”last_img

Moolman Pasio crowned African champion

first_img5 December 2013 South African cyclist Ashleigh Moolman Pasio was crowned African Continental Champion in the elite women’s road race at Sharm El Sheik in Egypt on Wednesday, while Monique Gerber claimed the junior women’s title. Moolman Pasio, who represented South Africa in the road race at the 2012 London Olympic Games, added the continental title to an impressive list of accolades this year. Her results have included victories in the road race and time trial at the South African Championships, a win in the Momentum 94.7 Cycle Challenge, another title in the Boels Rental Hills Classic in The Netherlands, a first ever podium finish in a UCI World Cup event at the prestigious La Fleche Wallonne Feminine, and eighth place in the Giro Donne, the women’s version of the Giro d’Italia, which is renowned for being the toughest race in women’s cycling.Tightly contested The finish to Wednesday’s 93-kilometre race was tightly contested, with Moolman Pasio, Vera Adrian from Namibia (silver) and Wehazit Kidane from Eritrea (bronze) all recording the same time of one hour, 53 minutes 24 seconds. South Africa’s An-Li Kachelhoffer finished in fourth place, missing the podium by 33 seconds. Junior cyclist Gerber crossed the finish line in first place ahead of Ebtesam Zayed Ahmed (Egypt) and teammate Mikayla Oliver, who claimed a bronze medal, in a time of 56 minutes and 21 seconds for the 63-kilometre route. Fellow South Africans Heidi Dalton and Andri Coetzee finished in fourth and seventh places respectively, also recording the same finishing time as Gerber.Bronze medal In the junior men’s race, contested over 93 kilometres, Ivan Venter, who races in the Nuwater team in South Africa, claimed a bronze medal an hour, 33 minutes and three seconds, the same time as the race winner, Morocco’s Abderrahim Zahiri, with Algeria’s Abderrahmane Mansouri finishing second. Morne van Niekerk claimed sixth place in the same time, while Nickolas Dlamini ended tenth, three seconds behind the winner, and Jandrich Kotze placed 17th. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Three Creative Responses to a Shrinking Economy

first_imgBy Barbara O’Neill, Ph.D., CFP®, Rutgers Cooperative Extension, [email protected] military families and the professionals who serve them have found themselves living on less real (after inflation) income in recent years. At the same time, household expenses such as rent, food, and out-of-pocket health care costs, have continued to rise. In addition, much has been written about shrinking economies in countries such as Greece and Japan and the decreasing middle class population in the United States.When economies shrink or income levels get smaller, spending generally decreases. People lose jobs or their wages decrease or remain stagnant. This, in turn, results in household spending cutbacks. People buy less, eat out less, buy less expensive items, and look for other ways to economize.The “official” measurement of economic growth (or lack thereof) is the gross domestic product or GDP, which is calculated on an annual and quarterly basis. Used officially since 1944, GDP measures the monetary value of goods and services produced within a country. It is tracked over time to measure economic growth or decline and to determine if a recession is occurring. For example, a government report might say “GDP grew by 2.4% in 2015.”There are also informal ways to measure economic growth, including studying current retailing trends and stories about individual and household responses to a shrinking economy. These, too, provide valuable insights into spending habits. At the 2016 meeting of the Family Economics/Resource Management Association (FERMA), the following three strategies that U.S. consumers have adopted to live in a shrinking economy were described:FreeganismAt the FERMA conference, freeganism was loosely defined as the practice of reclaiming food and other items (e.g., clothing, home furnishings, etc.) that have been discarded. This movement originally started in the 1960s with discarded food and is a mash of the words “free” and “vegan.” Not only does freeganism save people money, but it is environmentally friendly and keeps usable items out of landfills. The Youtube video, Freeganism: Living Off Trash, explains the basic tenants of freeganism: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCyPv0j4bPw.The description of the video states They live for free. They eat for free. Or as close to free as they can manage. They’re more than frugal; they’re freegans. With recession woes inspiring more people to look for meaning outside the mall, freeganism is gaining ground. Methods used by freegans to obtain items at no cost include taking items set outside by others for trash pick-up, pulling items out of trash receptacles (a.k.a, “dumpster diving”), re-using family hand-me-down items, and participating in community Freecycle Network programs where people donate and receive items for free in their local community (see https://www.freecycle.org/).Tiny HousesPhoto by Jon Callas. CC BY 2.0The tiny house movement has been profiled on several reality television shows. Instead of buying a typical home that averages around 2,600 square feet, people choose to live a simpler lifestyle with fewer possessions in homes that measure 100 to 500 square feet. Home purchase costs are reduced and so are costs for utilities, property taxes, and maintenance. Obviously, living and storage space are greatly reduced also, which may require downsizing. The 30-Day Downsizing Challenge is one strategy to do this. You start by donating or gifting one item on Day 1, two items on Day 2, three items on Day 3, etc. By the end of Day 30, you will have removed 465 items from your possession.MinimalismMinimalism is just what the name implies: the practice of simple, frugal living with fewer material items and less clutter. Some have even suggested a maximum number of personal possessions, such as 100 or 200 items. For clips from a 2016 documentary film about minimalism, see http://www.theminimalists.com/five-clips/. For an article that explains the concept, see http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/07/living-with-less/374544/.last_img read more